Wimbledon 2011

It's been a rough year for top seeds at Wimbledon.

When Kate attended Wimbledon this summer, she gave us a rare peek inside her makeup bag. The royal was spotted with a tube of Clarins Instant Light Natural Lip Perfector Gloss in her hand. The French skincare and cosmetics brand is also a favorite of the Queen. <strong>Buy it! </strong>Natural Lip Perfector, $26; clarinsusa.com
Royal-Approved Lip Gloss
When Kate attended Wimbledon this summer, she gave us a rare peek inside her makeup bag. The royal was spotted with a tube of Clarins Instant Light Natural Lip Perfector Gloss in her hand. The French skincare and cosmetics brand is also a favorite of the Queen. Buy it! Natural Lip Perfector, $26; clarinsusa.com
Suarez Navarro was thrashed by Serena Williams in the Wimbledon last 16 earlier this year (AFP Photo/GLYN KIRK)
Suarez Navarro was thrashed by Serena Williams in the Wimbledon last 16 earlier this year
Suarez Navarro was thrashed by Serena Williams in the Wimbledon last 16 earlier this year (AFP Photo/GLYN KIRK)
Major sporting venues and events, like Wimbledon, have taken steps to reduce waste - POOL Getty
Major sporting venues including Lord's, Wembley and Twickenham make move towards greener practices
Major sporting venues and events, like Wimbledon, have taken steps to reduce waste - POOL Getty
Major sporting venues and events, like Wimbledon, have taken steps to reduce waste - POOL Getty
Major sporting venues including Lord's, Wembley and Twickenham make move towards greener practices
Major sporting venues and events, like Wimbledon, have taken steps to reduce waste - POOL Getty
<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH</p> <p>SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:</p> <p> "The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."</p> <p>STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.</p> <p> The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years</p> <p> Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.</p>
'I see no reason to stop' - At 38 Federer not thinking of retirement

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS A WHITE FLASH

SHOWS: BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA (NOVEMBER 18, 2019) (REUTERS - ACCESS ALL)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"I don't know the answer to be honest. As long as I'm feeling good right now and I'm really enjoying my life on the road and enjoy playing against Sascha (Zverev) and the others players on the tour I see no reason to stop. But of course with age everything get a bit more difficult, but at the same time with experience also you can savor the moments more. So I don't know how it's going to end. I hope it's just going to be somewhat emotional I guess and nice and, I don't know, I hope it's going to be good, the whole process and not too difficult."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) 20-TIME GRAND SLAM CHAMPION, ROGER FEDERER, SAYING:

"The more funny thing was back in 2009 when I won the French Open and I won the four different Grand Slams and I broke the all-time Grand Slam record. Then the following month at Wimbledon when I won Wimbledon again, I won the 15th slam, that's when people already started asking me if I was going to retire soon, that was in 2009. So this is ten years ago and something - I can handle this type of question and I try to give always a good answer because I know that everybody cares and wants to know about it. But there's honestly nothing new there, at the moment I'm very happy playing on the tour."

STORY: Swiss tennis star Roger Federer, ranked third in the world, said Monday (November 18) he sees 'no reason to stop,' when asked if he was considering retirement.

The 38-year-old winner of 20 grand slam titles to date noted that he has been asked about retiring for the past ten years

Federer is closing out the year with a series of exhibition matches against German Alexander Zverev in Latin America with the tour taking him to Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador and Mexico.

Roger Federer suffered an agonising defeat against Novak Djokovic in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Roger Federer suffered an agonising defeat against Novak Djokovic in the 2019 Wimbledon final
Roger Federer suffered an agonising defeat against Novak Djokovic in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
ATP Finals: Roger Federer avenges Wimbledon agony with victory over Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic (right) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
Novak Djokovic (right) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final
Novak Djokovic (right) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
Though <em>Bring It On</em> is cheerier than some of Dunst’s more dramatic fare, it’s just as indelible as the <em>Melancholia</em>s of the bunch (don’t even pretend you’ve forgotten so much as a single word to “Brr! It’s Cold in Here!”). And even when she’s playing an in-it-to-win-it competitor, Dunst’s characters always know — and wrestle with the fact — that there are more important things than just the trophy on the line. <strong>SEE ALSO: </strong><em>Drop Dead Gorgeous</em>, <em>Wimbledon</em>, <em>Get Over It</em>
6. Kirsten the Contender
Though Bring It On is cheerier than some of Dunst’s more dramatic fare, it’s just as indelible as the Melancholias of the bunch (don’t even pretend you’ve forgotten so much as a single word to “Brr! It’s Cold in Here!”). And even when she’s playing an in-it-to-win-it competitor, Dunst’s characters always know — and wrestle with the fact — that there are more important things than just the trophy on the line. SEE ALSO: Drop Dead Gorgeous, Wimbledon, Get Over It
Bertrand Milbourne Clark was the first black player to compete at Wimbledon as well as being an accomplished golfer and cricketer
Meet Bertrand Milbourne Clark: Wimbledon's first black participant and sporting polymath
Bertrand Milbourne Clark was the first black player to compete at Wimbledon as well as being an accomplished golfer and cricketer
Bertrand Milbourne Clark was the first black player to compete at Wimbledon as well as being an accomplished golfer and cricketer
Meet Bertrand Milbourne Clark: The sporting polymath who became Wimbledon's first black participant in 1924
Bertrand Milbourne Clark was the first black player to compete at Wimbledon as well as being an accomplished golfer and cricketer
Novak Djokovic (left) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Laurence Griffiths)
Novak Djokovic (left) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final
Novak Djokovic (left) beat Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon final (AFP Photo/Laurence Griffiths)
Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer who provided spectators with an epic Wimbledon final earlier this year will clash again in the same group at the season-ending ATP Finals (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer who provided spectators with an epic Wimbledon final earlier this year will clash again in the same group at the season-ending ATP Finals
Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer who provided spectators with an epic Wimbledon final earlier this year will clash again in the same group at the season-ending ATP Finals (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
WTA Finals 2019: Karolina Pliskova outguns Simona Halep to leave Wimbledon champion to reflect on mixed year
Wally Downes was first charged by the FA on September 25, with his club suspending him - PA
AFC Wimbledon manager Wally Downes banned for 28 days by FA over betting rules breach
Wally Downes was first charged by the FA on September 25, with his club suspending him - PA
Sir David Attenborough at the Seven Worlds, One Planet premiere - PA
Demand for David Attenborough tickets outstrips Glastonbury, Wimbledon and Olympics
Sir David Attenborough at the Seven Worlds, One Planet premiere - PA
Coco Gauff tras vencer a Venus Williams en Wimbledon, el lunes 1 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Tim Ireland)
COCO GAUFF
Coco Gauff tras vencer a Venus Williams en Wimbledon, el lunes 1 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Tim Ireland)
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah celebrate winning their first Grand Slam at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah celebrate winning their first Grand Slam at Wimbledon
Juan Sebastian Cabal and Robert Farah celebrate winning their first Grand Slam at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
Goran Ivanisevic won Wimbledon in 2001 (AFP Photo/GERRY PENNY)
Goran Ivanisevic won Wimbledon in 2001
Goran Ivanisevic won Wimbledon in 2001 (AFP Photo/GERRY PENNY)
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
Venus Williams Shares Her Nighttime Skin Care Routine
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
Venus Williams Shares Her Nighttime Skin Care Routine
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
Venus Williams Shares Her Nighttime Skin Care Routine
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
Venus Williams Shares Her Nighttime Skin Care Routine
In this episode of Go to Bed with Me, five-time Wimbledon tennis champion Venus Williams walks us through her nightly skin care routine. "This routine takes care of your insides and your outsides," Williams says at the start of her regimen. "That way, in case we get old, we still look amazing. And old is just a state of mind, right?"
Wally Downes has been charged by the FA for eight gambling breaches - PA
AFC Wimbledon manager Wally Downes suspended over numerous gambling breaches spanning nearly six years
Wally Downes has been charged by the FA for eight gambling breaches - PA
Meghan Markle <a href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-kate-middleton-wimbledon-sisters-in-law-date/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon</a> with Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton wearing a white button-down shirt which she paired with a pleated white and blue skirt from Hugo Boss. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Howriis Women's Summer Chiffon Pleated A-line Midi Skirt Dress, $27.99; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Howriis-Womens-Summer-Chiffon-Pleated/dp/B07PVS1T53/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=pleated+white+midi+skirt&qid=1563386902&s=gateway&sr=8-20-spons&psc=1&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfmeghanmarklesummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=30807c82430730807b5c8a0553586558&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> Chelsea28 Stripe Wrap Skirt, $47.40 (orig. $79); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fchelsea28-stripe-wrap-skirt%2F5135989&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Max Studio Pleated Striped Midi Skirt, $48.30 (orig. $69); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=36025&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lastcall.com%2FMax-Studio-Pleated-Striped-Midi-Skirt-pleated-midi-skirt%2Fprod53940361___%2Fp.prod&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:lastcall.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">lastcall.com</a> BCBGMAXAZRIA Two-Tone Pleated Midi Skirt, $139.30 (orig. $199); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=36025&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lastcall.com%2FBCBGMAXAZRIA-Two-Tone-Pleated-Midi-Skirt-pleated-midi-skirt%2Fprod54200885___%2Fp.prod&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:lastcall.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">lastcall.com</a> REISS Leona Floral Midi Skirt, $145 (orig. $295); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Freiss-leona-floral-midi-skirt%3FID%3D3332036&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> Club Monaco Majida Skirt, $139 (orig. $179.50); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=37811&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.clubmonaco.com%2Fen%2Fwomen-clothing-skirts%2Fmajida-skirt%2F484553.html&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:clubmonaco.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">clubmonaco.com</a>
Meghan Markle attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon with Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton wearing a white button-down shirt which she paired with a pleated white and blue skirt from Hugo Boss. Get the Look! Howriis Women's Summer Chiffon Pleated A-line Midi Skirt Dress, $27.99; amazon.com Chelsea28 Stripe Wrap Skirt, $47.40 (orig. $79); nordstrom.com Max Studio Pleated Striped Midi Skirt, $48.30 (orig. $69); lastcall.com BCBGMAXAZRIA Two-Tone Pleated Midi Skirt, $139.30 (orig. $199); lastcall.com REISS Leona Floral Midi Skirt, $145 (orig. $295); bloomingdales.com Club Monaco Majida Skirt, $139 (orig. $179.50); clubmonaco.com
Meghan Markle made a <a href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-attends-wimbledon-watch-serena-williams/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:surprise appearance at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">surprise appearance at Wimbledon</a> on the 4th of July to cheer on her friend Serena Williams. The Duchess of Sussex looked cute and casual wearing a $550 L’Agence pinstripe blazer, skinny jeans and black pumps. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Vero Moda Anna Striped One-Button Blazer, $65; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fvero-moda-anna-striped-one-button-blazer%3FID%3D3307173&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> Closet London Oversized Blazer in Oatmeal Stripe, $113; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=35719&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fus.asos.com%2Fcloset-london%2Fcloset-london-oversized-blazer-in-oatmeal-stripe%2Fprd%2F11685722&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:asos.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">asos.com</a> T Tahari Striped Open Blazer, $158; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Ft-tahari-striped-open-blazer%3FID%3D3384948&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> 7 For All Mankind Boyfriend Blazer, $299; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=42352&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.shopbop.com%2Fboyfriend-blazer-7-all-mankind%2Fvp%2Fv%3D1%2F1579093055.htm&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:shopbop.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">shopbop.com</a> Joie Darryl Stripe Blazer, $208.60 (orig. $298); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fjoie-darryl-striped-blazer%3FID%3D3294727&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a>
Meghan Markle made a surprise appearance at Wimbledon on the 4th of July to cheer on her friend Serena Williams. The Duchess of Sussex looked cute and casual wearing a $550 L’Agence pinstripe blazer, skinny jeans and black pumps. Get the Look! Vero Moda Anna Striped One-Button Blazer, $65; bloomingdales.com Closet London Oversized Blazer in Oatmeal Stripe, $113; asos.com T Tahari Striped Open Blazer, $158; bloomingdales.com 7 For All Mankind Boyfriend Blazer, $299; shopbop.com Joie Darryl Stripe Blazer, $208.60 (orig. $298); bloomingdales.com
<p>U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu returned to her hometown a conquering hero on Wednesday (September 11) with a little more celebrating to do before getting back to work and setting new goals, such as staying injury-free.</p> <p>Looking weary after a whirlwind media tour of New York, Andreescu said she was running on adrenaline after her shock straight sets win over 23-times Grand Slam champion Serena Williams in the final of the U.S. Open on Saturday (September 7).</p> <p>The celebrations are expected to become a regular thing for Andreescu, who pundits predict will soon climb to number one in the world rankings and win many more Grand Slams.</p> <p>The future seems impossibly bright for the 19-year-old Canadian, who was even asked who she would like to play her in a movie about her life.</p> <p>"I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe," she said.</p> <p>Not yet out of her teens, Andreescu has spent a good chunk of her young career battling back, leg and shoulder issues that caused her to miss a big chunk of the claycourt campaign and all of the of the grasscourt season, including Wimbledon.</p> <p>But on the North American hardcourts Andreescu looked invincible.</p> <p>She beat Williams in the final of the Rogers Cup in August to become the first Canadian to win the national title in 50 years then staged a remarkable run to the trophy in Flushing Meadows.</p> <p>Having won her first Grand Slam, two of the WTA Tour's elite events in Toronto and Indian Wells and shot to number five in the world rankings, Andreescu has had to do a quick reset of her goals, having already far exceeded her targets for 2019.</p> <p>Now she is focused on qualifying for season ending WTA Tour finals, climbing further up the rankings and representing Canada at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.</p>
U.S. Open champ picks Jennifer Lawrence to play her

U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu returned to her hometown a conquering hero on Wednesday (September 11) with a little more celebrating to do before getting back to work and setting new goals, such as staying injury-free.

Looking weary after a whirlwind media tour of New York, Andreescu said she was running on adrenaline after her shock straight sets win over 23-times Grand Slam champion Serena Williams in the final of the U.S. Open on Saturday (September 7).

The celebrations are expected to become a regular thing for Andreescu, who pundits predict will soon climb to number one in the world rankings and win many more Grand Slams.

The future seems impossibly bright for the 19-year-old Canadian, who was even asked who she would like to play her in a movie about her life.

"I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe," she said.

Not yet out of her teens, Andreescu has spent a good chunk of her young career battling back, leg and shoulder issues that caused her to miss a big chunk of the claycourt campaign and all of the of the grasscourt season, including Wimbledon.

But on the North American hardcourts Andreescu looked invincible.

She beat Williams in the final of the Rogers Cup in August to become the first Canadian to win the national title in 50 years then staged a remarkable run to the trophy in Flushing Meadows.

Having won her first Grand Slam, two of the WTA Tour's elite events in Toronto and Indian Wells and shot to number five in the world rankings, Andreescu has had to do a quick reset of her goals, having already far exceeded her targets for 2019.

Now she is focused on qualifying for season ending WTA Tour finals, climbing further up the rankings and representing Canada at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

<p>EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS WHITE FLASHES</p> <p>VIDEO SHOWS: U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU'S NEWS CONFERENCE UPON HER RETURN TO CANADA AFTER HER U.S. OPEN VICTORY</p> <p>SHOWS:</p> <p>TORONTO, CANADA (SEPTEMBER 11, 2019) (CBC - SEE RESTRICTIONS ABOVE) </p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU, SAYING: </p> <p> Reporter: "If there was a movie made about your file who would you want to play you and who would you want to play your parents?"</p> <p> Andreesscu: "That's a good question. I've never been asked that before.I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe. My parents. I don't know. Are they here? You should ask them. I don't want to say anything wrong."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU, SAYING: </p> <p> "I have pretty big expectations for myself. I've accomplished a lot in this past year and I feel I can do even more in this sport. I actually, believe I can do more for this sport after all of this success so I'm just going to keep striving and hopefully win many more grand slams from now on." </p> <p>STORY: U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu returned to her hometown a conquering hero on Wednesday (September 11) with a little more celebrating to do before getting back to work and setting new goals, such as staying injury-free.</p> <p> Looking weary after a whirlwind media tour of New York, Andreescu said she was running on adrenaline after her shock straight sets win over 23-times Grand Slam champion Serena Williams in the final of the U.S. Open on Saturday.</p> <p> The celebrations are expected to become a regular thing for Andreescu, who pundits predict will soon climb to number one in the world rankings and win many more Grand Slams.</p> <p> The future seems impossibly bright for the 19-year-old Canadian, who was even asked who she would like to play her in a movie about her life. </p> <p>"I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe." </p> <p> Not yet out of her teens, Andreescu has spent a good chunk of her young career battling back, leg and shoulder issues that caused her to miss a big chunk of the claycourt campaign and all of the of the grasscourt season, including Wimbledon.</p> <p> But on the North American hardcourts Andreescu looked invincible. </p> <p> She beat Williams in the final of the Rogers Cup in August to become the first Canadian to win the national title in 50 years then staged a remarkable run to the trophy in Flushing Meadows.</p> <p> Having won her first Grand Slam, two of the WTA Tour's elite events in Toronto and Indian Wells and shot to number five in the world rankings, Andreescu has had to do a quick reset of her goals, having already far exceeded her targets for 2019.</p> <p> Now she is focused on qualifying for season ending WTA Tour finals, climbing further up the rankings and representing Canada at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.</p> <p> "I have pretty big expectations for myself," said Andreescu. "I kind of have an idea, I want to do well in my next couple of tournaments in Asia to hopefully qualify for the WTA Tour finals in China and crack the top three.</p> <p> "I've accomplished a lot this past year and I feel I can do even more, now I actually believe I can do more after all of this success so I am going to keep striving and hopefully win many more Grand Slams.</p> <p> Before all that, Andreescu will bask in the glow of her U.S. Open triumph just a little bit longer.</p> <p> She plans to celebrate a bit more with her hometown friends but is also looking forward to sleeping in her own bed.</p> <p> "I've been getting more recognised than usual," said Andreescu, who was ranked an anonymous 178th in the world at the end of last season. "It's been hectic.</p> <p>(Production: Peter Bullock) </p>
U.S. Open champ Bianca Andreescu returns home to Canada

EDITORS PLEASE NOTE: EDIT CONTAINS WHITE FLASHES

VIDEO SHOWS: U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU'S NEWS CONFERENCE UPON HER RETURN TO CANADA AFTER HER U.S. OPEN VICTORY

SHOWS:

TORONTO, CANADA (SEPTEMBER 11, 2019) (CBC - SEE RESTRICTIONS ABOVE)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU, SAYING:

Reporter: "If there was a movie made about your file who would you want to play you and who would you want to play your parents?"

Andreesscu: "That's a good question. I've never been asked that before.I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe. My parents. I don't know. Are they here? You should ask them. I don't want to say anything wrong."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) U.S. OPEN CHAMP BIANCA ANDREESCU, SAYING:

"I have pretty big expectations for myself. I've accomplished a lot in this past year and I feel I can do even more in this sport. I actually, believe I can do more for this sport after all of this success so I'm just going to keep striving and hopefully win many more grand slams from now on."

STORY: U.S. Open champion Bianca Andreescu returned to her hometown a conquering hero on Wednesday (September 11) with a little more celebrating to do before getting back to work and setting new goals, such as staying injury-free.

Looking weary after a whirlwind media tour of New York, Andreescu said she was running on adrenaline after her shock straight sets win over 23-times Grand Slam champion Serena Williams in the final of the U.S. Open on Saturday.

The celebrations are expected to become a regular thing for Andreescu, who pundits predict will soon climb to number one in the world rankings and win many more Grand Slams.

The future seems impossibly bright for the 19-year-old Canadian, who was even asked who she would like to play her in a movie about her life.

"I really like Jennifer Lawrence ... to play me, she's a really cool person and I feel we have a pretty similar vibe."

Not yet out of her teens, Andreescu has spent a good chunk of her young career battling back, leg and shoulder issues that caused her to miss a big chunk of the claycourt campaign and all of the of the grasscourt season, including Wimbledon.

But on the North American hardcourts Andreescu looked invincible.

She beat Williams in the final of the Rogers Cup in August to become the first Canadian to win the national title in 50 years then staged a remarkable run to the trophy in Flushing Meadows.

Having won her first Grand Slam, two of the WTA Tour's elite events in Toronto and Indian Wells and shot to number five in the world rankings, Andreescu has had to do a quick reset of her goals, having already far exceeded her targets for 2019.

Now she is focused on qualifying for season ending WTA Tour finals, climbing further up the rankings and representing Canada at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

"I have pretty big expectations for myself," said Andreescu. "I kind of have an idea, I want to do well in my next couple of tournaments in Asia to hopefully qualify for the WTA Tour finals in China and crack the top three.

"I've accomplished a lot this past year and I feel I can do even more, now I actually believe I can do more after all of this success so I am going to keep striving and hopefully win many more Grand Slams.

Before all that, Andreescu will bask in the glow of her U.S. Open triumph just a little bit longer.

She plans to celebrate a bit more with her hometown friends but is also looking forward to sleeping in her own bed.

"I've been getting more recognised than usual," said Andreescu, who was ranked an anonymous 178th in the world at the end of last season. "It's been hectic.

(Production: Peter Bullock)

Kate Middleton <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-rewears-green-dress-wimbledon/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon</a> with Pippa Middleton and Meghan Markle wearing a green Dolce & Gabbana midi dress with button detail (a royal re-wear!), nude pumps and a matching nude top-handle bag. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> All In Favor Double Breasted Midi Dress, $35.40 (orig. $59); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fall-in-favor-double-breasted-midi-dress%2F5267143&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Privacy Please Leandra Midi Dress, $188; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201909,I/https://www.revolve.com/privacy-please-leandra-midi-dress/dp/PRIP-WD811/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a> Whistles Microspot Midi Dress, $339; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fwhistles-microspot-midi-dress%2F5337753&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Urban CoCo Short Sleeve Waisted Slim Fit Midi Dress, $18.98; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Urban-CoCo-Womens-Sleeve-Waisted/dp/B07S1FFJZG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=green+midi+dress+women&qid=1563380417&s=gateway&sr=8-31&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfkatemiddletonsummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=0e9f5c61ad06b6dd9ffbbcdb84852186&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> & Other Stories Linen Blend Puff Sleeve Dress, $119; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=41994&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.stories.com%2Fen_usd%2Fclothing%2Fdresses%2Fproduct.linen-blend-puff-sleeve-dress-green.0727837001.html&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stories.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stories.com</a>
Kate Middleton attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon with Pippa Middleton and Meghan Markle wearing a green Dolce & Gabbana midi dress with button detail (a royal re-wear!), nude pumps and a matching nude top-handle bag. Get the Look! All In Favor Double Breasted Midi Dress, $35.40 (orig. $59); nordstrom.com Privacy Please Leandra Midi Dress, $188; revolve.com Whistles Microspot Midi Dress, $339; nordstrom.com Urban CoCo Short Sleeve Waisted Slim Fit Midi Dress, $18.98; amazon.com & Other Stories Linen Blend Puff Sleeve Dress, $119; stories.com
The Duchess of Cambridge <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-surprises-wimbledon-fans-and-not-in-the-royal-box/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon</a> wearing a chic puff-sleeve white shirt dress with a black Alexander McQueen belt. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Kate Spade New York Button Front Midi Dress, $298; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fkate-spade-new-york-button-front-midi-sundress%2F5340123&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> ASOS Design Button Through Maxi Dress in Seersucker, $56; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=35719&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fus.asos.com%2Fasos-design%2Fasos-design-button-through-maxi-dress-in-seersucker%2Fprd%2F11943526&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:asos.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">asos.com</a> Heartloom Carson Dress, $130; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201909,I/https://www.revolve.com/heartloom-carson-dress/dp/HEAR-WD203/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a> ASOS Design Button Through Midi Dress with Puff Sleeves and Buckle Belt in Self Stripe, $67; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=35719&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fus.asos.com%2Fasos-design%2Fasos-design-button-through-midi-dress-with-puff-sleeves-and-buckle-belt-in-self-stripe%2Fprd%2F12180479&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:asos.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">asos.com</a> L’Academie The Yvon Midi Dress, $248; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201909,I/https://www.revolve.com/lacademie-the-yvon-midi-dress/dp/LCDE-WD214/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a>
The Duchess of Cambridge cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon wearing a chic puff-sleeve white shirt dress with a black Alexander McQueen belt. Get the Look! Kate Spade New York Button Front Midi Dress, $298; nordstrom.com ASOS Design Button Through Maxi Dress in Seersucker, $56; asos.com Heartloom Carson Dress, $130; revolve.com ASOS Design Button Through Midi Dress with Puff Sleeves and Buckle Belt in Self Stripe, $67; asos.com L’Academie The Yvon Midi Dress, $248; revolve.com
The Duchess of Cambridge went on <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-prince-william-wimbledon-date-2019/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon</a> wearing a light blue Emilia Wickstead dress and nude pumps. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Gal Meets Glam Collection Hilary Clip Dot Chiffon Midi Dress, $168; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fgal-meets-glam-collection-hilary-clip-dot-chiffon-midi-dress%2F4920307&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> MUXXN Women's 1950s Retro Vintage Cap Sleeve Party Swing Dress, $36.99; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/MUXXN-Audry-Hepburn-Style-Graduation/dp/B07TB1JS4M/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=light+blue+midi+dress+women&qid=1563381439&s=gateway&sr=8-39&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfkatemiddletonsummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=79346507e072691aa83bf0824910e15f&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> Gal Meets Glam Collection Addison Cotton Tie Waist Fit & Flare Wrap Dress, $188; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fgal-meets-glam-collection-addison-cotton-tie-waist-fit-flare-wrap-dress%2F4952604&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Kate Spade New York Denim Faux-Wrap Dress, $278; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fkate-spade-new-york-denim-faux-wrap-dress%3FID%3D3331618&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> Sau Lee Emma Lace Dress, $460; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fsau-lee-emma-lace-dress%3FID%3D3253437&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201909%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a>
The Duchess of Cambridge went on a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon wearing a light blue Emilia Wickstead dress and nude pumps. Get the Look! Gal Meets Glam Collection Hilary Clip Dot Chiffon Midi Dress, $168; nordstrom.com MUXXN Women's 1950s Retro Vintage Cap Sleeve Party Swing Dress, $36.99; amazon.com Gal Meets Glam Collection Addison Cotton Tie Waist Fit & Flare Wrap Dress, $188; nordstrom.com Kate Spade New York Denim Faux-Wrap Dress, $278; bloomingdales.com Sau Lee Emma Lace Dress, $460; bloomingdales.com
In <a href="https://people.com/royals/serena-williams-wont-give-meghan-markle-parenting-advice/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a recent interview" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a recent interview</a>, the tennis star shared that she is refraining from offering parenting advice to Meghan for now. “I never pass on words of wisdom because I feel like everyone, when they have a kid, especially when you just have a baby, it is so difficult to just be,” Williams told <span>BBC Breakfast</span> ahead of Wimbledon. “And it’s just like, get through the first three months, four months, and then we can talk.”
In a recent interview, the tennis star shared that she is refraining from offering parenting advice to Meghan for now. “I never pass on words of wisdom because I feel like everyone, when they have a kid, especially when you just have a baby, it is so difficult to just be,” Williams told BBC Breakfast ahead of Wimbledon. “And it’s just like, get through the first three months, four months, and then we can talk.”
<p>Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.</p> <p>The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title . </p> <p>That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success. </p> <p>Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions. </p> <p>At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final. </p> <p>Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter. </p> <p>But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd. </p> <p>She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy. </p> <p>A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.</p>
Serena poised for record-tying U.S. Open final

Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.

The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title .

That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success.

Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions.

At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final.

Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter.

But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd.

She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy.

A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.

<p>Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.</p> <p>The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title . </p> <p>That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success. </p> <p>Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions. </p> <p>At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final. </p> <p>Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter. </p> <p>But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd. </p> <p>She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy. </p> <p>A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.</p>
Serena poised for record-tying U.S. Open final

Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.

The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title .

That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success.

Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions.

At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final.

Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter.

But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd.

She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy.

A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.

<p>Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.</p> <p>The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title . </p> <p>That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success. </p> <p>Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions. </p> <p>At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final. </p> <p>Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter. </p> <p>But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd. </p> <p>She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy. </p> <p>A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.</p>
Serena poised for record-tying U.S. Open final

Serena Williams is one step closer to Grand Slam history on Saturday as she returns to the U.S. Open finals in New York City.

The tennis champion is - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title .

That record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian's success.

Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions.

At last year's Open, she suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final.

Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action after giving birth to her daughter.

But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd.

She'll face Canadian Bianca Andreescu - who at 19-years old is half Serena's age - and is looking to win her first major trophy.

A win Saturday for Williams would also mean breaking Chris Evert's record of 101 U.S. Open wins, and her record of six U.S. Open title championships.

<p>Serena Williams inched closer to Grand Slam history on Thursday (September 5). </p> <p>The American stormed past Ukraine's Elina Svitolina in the US Open semi-final.</p> <p>Williams is now - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title. </p> <p>The record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian. </p> <p>Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions. </p> <p>At last year's Open, Williams suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final. </p> <p>Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action. </p> <p>But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd. </p> <p>She'll face the 19-year-old Canadian - Bianca Andreescu. </p> <p>After the bruising win over Svitolina on Thursday, Williams said: </p> <p>"To be in yet another final, is seems honestly crazy." </p> <p>But she added: "I don't really expect too much less." </p>
Williams one win away from history

Serena Williams inched closer to Grand Slam history on Thursday (September 5).

The American stormed past Ukraine's Elina Svitolina in the US Open semi-final.

Williams is now - once again - just one win away from a record equaling 24th Grand Slam title.

The record was set by Margaret Court in the 70s - with no other woman or man beating the Australian.

Williams has come agonizingly close to matching Court on three occasions.

At last year's Open, Williams suffered a mesmerizing meltdown on the court with Naomi Osaka becoming Japan's first Grand Slam singles champion in a chaotic and controversial final.

Williams has also lost two Wimbledon finals since her return to action.

But will get a fourth chance this Saturday in front of an adoring home crowd.

She'll face the 19-year-old Canadian - Bianca Andreescu.

After the bruising win over Svitolina on Thursday, Williams said:

"To be in yet another final, is seems honestly crazy."

But she added: "I don't really expect too much less."

Bianca Andreescu is just the second Canadian woman to reach a Grand Slam final -- after Eugenie Bouchard at Wimbledon in 2014 (AFP Photo/Johannes Eisele)
Bianca Andreescu is just the second Canadian woman to reach a Grand Slam final -- after Eugenie Bouchard at Wimbledon in 2014
Bianca Andreescu is just the second Canadian woman to reach a Grand Slam final -- after Eugenie Bouchard at Wimbledon in 2014 (AFP Photo/Johannes Eisele)
Retired tennis tour professional Melanie Oudin coaches youngsters at Windward Lake Club on Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in Alpharetta, Ga. A decade after her magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/John Amis)
US Open Oudin A Decade Later Tennis
Retired tennis tour professional Melanie Oudin coaches youngsters at Windward Lake Club on Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, in Alpharetta, Ga. A decade after her magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/John Amis)
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2009, file photo, Melanie Oudin, of the United States, wears shoes imprinted with "Believe" during her match against Elena Dementieva, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. A decade after that magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
US Open Oudin a Decade Later Tennis
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2009, file photo, Melanie Oudin, of the United States, wears shoes imprinted with "Believe" during her match against Elena Dementieva, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. A decade after that magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2009, file photo, Melanie Oudin, left, of the United States, shakes hands with Maria Sharapova, of Russia, at the net after her upset victory during the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Oudin won 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. A decade after that magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill, File)
US Open Oudin a Decade Later Tennis
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2009, file photo, Melanie Oudin, left, of the United States, shakes hands with Maria Sharapova, of Russia, at the net after her upset victory during the third round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Oudin won 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. A decade after that magical and memorable Grand Slam stay in New York, which followed a just-as-surprising run from qualifier to the fourth round at Wimbledon--like another American teen, Coco Gauff, did to much more fanfare this summer--Oudin is retired from the WTA tour, teaching kids the sport she loves and hoping to coach a pro one day. (AP Photo/Paul J. Bereswill, File)
Rafael Nadal (L) congratulates winner Roger Federer after their Wimbledon men's singles semi-final this year (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Rafael Nadal (L) congratulates winner Roger Federer after their Wimbledon men's singles semi-final this year
Rafael Nadal (L) congratulates winner Roger Federer after their Wimbledon men's singles semi-final this year (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
<p>VIDEO SHOWS: ROGER FEDERER PRESS CONFERENCE</p> <p>SHOWS: NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES (SEPTEMBER 3, 2019) (IMG / USTA - SEE RESTRICTIONS)</p> <p>1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING: </p> <p> "Just disappointed it's over because I did feel like I was actually playing really well after a couple of rocky starts. It's just a missed opportunity to some extent that you're in the lead, you can get through, you have two days off after. </p> <p> "It was looking good.</p> <p> "But you got to take the losses. They're part of the game."</p> <p>2. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING: </p> <p> "I don't have the crystal ball. Do you?" We never know. I hope so, of course. I think still it's been a positive season. Disappointing now, but I'll get back up, I'll be all right."</p> <p>4. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>5. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING: </p> <p> "I didn't think of it. If you move on, it's a thing of the past. I do remember playing good semis there, so it wasn't bad."</p> <p>6. WHITE FLASH</p> <p>7. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING: </p> <p> "Laver Cup, Shanghai, Basel, maybe Paris, London. That's the schedule for now. I don't know if the team have other ideas or not. I'm happy to get a bit of a break now, go back to practice, reassess and attack from there."</p> <p>STORY: Fresh from a heart-breaking loss at the All-England Tennis Club, the abrupt end to Roger Federer's U.S. Open on Tuesday (September 3) raised questions whether the 38-year-old can deliver on a record-extending 21st Grand Slam title.</p> <p> Federer had hoped to shake off the agony of his most recent Wimbledon final, where the top prize slipped through his fingers and into the arms of frequent rival Novak Djokovic after he failed to convert two championship points. </p> <p> But unseeded Grigor Dimitrov thwarted the effort in Flushing Meadows in a five-set marathon, leaving a puzzled crowd to wonder if the Swiss will ever again hoist a Grand Slam trophy.</p> <p> "Just disappointed it's over because I did feel like I was actually playing really well after a couple of rocky starts," said Federer. "It's just a missed opportunity to some extent that you're in the lead, you can get through, you have two days off after. </p> <p> "It was looking good.</p> <p> "But you got to take the losses. They're part of the game."</p> <p> Asked if he expected to win another Grand Slam title at his age third seed Federer quipped: "I don't have the crystal ball. Do you?</p> <p> "We never know. I hope so, of course. I think still it's been a positive season. Disappointing now, but I'll get back up, I'll be all right."</p> <p> He batted down suggestions that his Wimbledon performance this year played a role in his surprise U.S. Open upset.</p> <p> "I didn't think of it. If you move on, it's a thing of the past. I do remember playing good semis there, so it wasn't bad," he said.</p> <p> For Federer, nothing is out of the question -- and not without precedent: The oldest man to win the U.S. Open title was Bill Larned, who was 38 years, 8 months and 3 days old when he triumphed.</p> <p> Of course, that was in 1911.</p> <p> And past precedent is likely little comfort for Federer, who laid out for reporters an aggressive schedule of future competition.</p> <p> "Laver Cup, Shanghai, Basel, maybe Paris, London. That's the schedule for now. I don't know if the team have other ideas or not," said Federer. "I'm happy to get a bit of a break now, go back to practice, reassess and attack from there."</p> <p> In four months, he'll renew his effort to add to his Grand Slam coffers at the Australian Open, where he collected his last title in 2018.</p> <p> (Production: Andy Ragg)</p>
Another heartbreak for Federer in bid for 21st grand slam title

VIDEO SHOWS: ROGER FEDERER PRESS CONFERENCE

SHOWS: NEW YORK CITY, NEW YORK, UNITED STATES (SEPTEMBER 3, 2019) (IMG / USTA - SEE RESTRICTIONS)

1. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING:

"Just disappointed it's over because I did feel like I was actually playing really well after a couple of rocky starts. It's just a missed opportunity to some extent that you're in the lead, you can get through, you have two days off after.

"It was looking good.

"But you got to take the losses. They're part of the game."

2. WHITE FLASH

3. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING:

"I don't have the crystal ball. Do you?" We never know. I hope so, of course. I think still it's been a positive season. Disappointing now, but I'll get back up, I'll be all right."

4. WHITE FLASH

5. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING:

"I didn't think of it. If you move on, it's a thing of the past. I do remember playing good semis there, so it wasn't bad."

6. WHITE FLASH

7. (SOUNDBITE) (English) ROGER FEDERER SAYING:

"Laver Cup, Shanghai, Basel, maybe Paris, London. That's the schedule for now. I don't know if the team have other ideas or not. I'm happy to get a bit of a break now, go back to practice, reassess and attack from there."

STORY: Fresh from a heart-breaking loss at the All-England Tennis Club, the abrupt end to Roger Federer's U.S. Open on Tuesday (September 3) raised questions whether the 38-year-old can deliver on a record-extending 21st Grand Slam title.

Federer had hoped to shake off the agony of his most recent Wimbledon final, where the top prize slipped through his fingers and into the arms of frequent rival Novak Djokovic after he failed to convert two championship points.

But unseeded Grigor Dimitrov thwarted the effort in Flushing Meadows in a five-set marathon, leaving a puzzled crowd to wonder if the Swiss will ever again hoist a Grand Slam trophy.

"Just disappointed it's over because I did feel like I was actually playing really well after a couple of rocky starts," said Federer. "It's just a missed opportunity to some extent that you're in the lead, you can get through, you have two days off after.

"It was looking good.

"But you got to take the losses. They're part of the game."

Asked if he expected to win another Grand Slam title at his age third seed Federer quipped: "I don't have the crystal ball. Do you?

"We never know. I hope so, of course. I think still it's been a positive season. Disappointing now, but I'll get back up, I'll be all right."

He batted down suggestions that his Wimbledon performance this year played a role in his surprise U.S. Open upset.

"I didn't think of it. If you move on, it's a thing of the past. I do remember playing good semis there, so it wasn't bad," he said.

For Federer, nothing is out of the question -- and not without precedent: The oldest man to win the U.S. Open title was Bill Larned, who was 38 years, 8 months and 3 days old when he triumphed.

Of course, that was in 1911.

And past precedent is likely little comfort for Federer, who laid out for reporters an aggressive schedule of future competition.

"Laver Cup, Shanghai, Basel, maybe Paris, London. That's the schedule for now. I don't know if the team have other ideas or not," said Federer. "I'm happy to get a bit of a break now, go back to practice, reassess and attack from there."

In four months, he'll renew his effort to add to his Grand Slam coffers at the Australian Open, where he collected his last title in 2018.

(Production: Andy Ragg)

Konta won 6-2, 6-3 against Wimbledon quarter-finalist Zhang - FR171643 AP
Jo Konta dominates Shuai Zhang to set up US Open fourth-round clash with Karolina Pliskova
Konta won 6-2, 6-3 against Wimbledon quarter-finalist Zhang - FR171643 AP
Konta won 6-2, 6-3 against Wimbledon quarter-finalist Zhang - FR171643 AP
Jo Konta dominates Shuai Zhang to set up US Open fourth-round clash with Karolina Pliskova
Konta won 6-2, 6-3 against Wimbledon quarter-finalist Zhang - FR171643 AP
American qualifier Taylor Townsend reacts after her victory over reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep on Thursday in the second round of the US Open (AFP Photo/TIMOTHY A. CLARY)
American qualifier Taylor Townsend reacts after her victory over reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep on Thursday in the second round of the US Open
American qualifier Taylor Townsend reacts after her victory over reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep on Thursday in the second round of the US Open (AFP Photo/TIMOTHY A. CLARY)
American Nicole Gibbs, who had to battle back from cancer just to reach the US Open, reacts to a point Tuesday in her loss to Wimbledon champion Simona Halep (AFP Photo/CLIVE BRUNSKILL)
American Nicole Gibbs, who had to battle back from cancer just to reach the US Open, reacts to a point Tuesday in her loss to Wimbledon champion Simona Halep
American Nicole Gibbs, who had to battle back from cancer just to reach the US Open, reacts to a point Tuesday in her loss to Wimbledon champion Simona Halep (AFP Photo/CLIVE BRUNSKILL)
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep, a first-round US Open loser the past two years, advanced to the second round of the Grand Slam event on Tuesday (AFP Photo/CLIVE BRUNSKILL)
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep, a first-round US Open loser the past two years, advanced to the second round of the Grand Slam event on Tuesday
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep, a first-round US Open loser the past two years, advanced to the second round of the Grand Slam event on Tuesday (AFP Photo/CLIVE BRUNSKILL)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-GAUFF & MCNALLY
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-GAUFF & MCNALLY
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-GAUFF & MCNALLY
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
Johanna Konta shrugs off Wimbledon hangover talk as she prepares to lead British charge at US Open 2019
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
Johanna Konta shrugs off Wimbledon hangover talk as she prepares to lead British charge at US Open 2019
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
Johanna Konta shrugs off Wimbledon hangover talk as she prepares to lead British charge at US Open 2019
Johanna Konta has lost both matches she's played since Wimbledon - Getty Images North America
US 15-year-old Cori "Coco" Gauff faces big expectations at the US Open after a run to the fourth round at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam debut (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
US 15-year-old Cori "Coco" Gauff faces big expectations at the US Open after a run to the fourth round at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam debut
US 15-year-old Cori "Coco" Gauff faces big expectations at the US Open after a run to the fourth round at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam debut (AFP Photo/Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-GAUFF & MCNALLY
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
FILE - In this July 5, 1958, file photo, New York's Althea Gibson waves the winner's plate aloft after she defeated Britain's Angela Mortimer in the women's singles tennis final at Wimbledon, England. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
Althea Gibson Statue Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 1958, file photo, New York's Althea Gibson waves the winner's plate aloft after she defeated Britain's Angela Mortimer in the women's singles tennis final at Wimbledon, England. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 1957, file photo, Althea Gibson smiles as she holds her trophies she won by capturing the National women's singles tennis championship at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo, File)
Althea Gibson Statue Tennis
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 1957, file photo, Althea Gibson smiles as she holds her trophies she won by capturing the National women's singles tennis championship at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo, File)
FILE - In this July 7, 1956, file photo, the Duchess of Kent, center, presents the trophy for the Ladies' Doubles title to Angela Buxton, left, and Althea Gibson, right, following their victory at Wimbledon, England. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
Althea Gibson Statue Tennis
FILE - In this July 7, 1956, file photo, the Duchess of Kent, center, presents the trophy for the Ladies' Doubles title to Angela Buxton, left, and Althea Gibson, right, following their victory at Wimbledon, England. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this May 13, 1988, file photo, tennis players Arthur Ashe, left, and Althea Gibson pose while holding trophies after being inducted into the Eastern Tennis Association Hall of Fame in New York. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan, File)
Althea Gibson Statue Tennis
FILE - In this May 13, 1988, file photo, tennis players Arthur Ashe, left, and Althea Gibson pose while holding trophies after being inducted into the Eastern Tennis Association Hall of Fame in New York. Gibson won an amazing 11 Grand Slam titles in three years from 1956-58, including the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. On Monday, Aug. 26, 2019, the USTA will unveil a statue in her honor at the U.S. Open. (AP Photo/Susan Ragan, File)
FILE - In this July 11, 1957, file photo, Althea Gibson, who won the Wimbledon women's singles and doubles, smiles and waves to the crowd from the backseat of the open car during a ticker-tape parade up Broadway in New York. Gibson basked in a ticker tape parade in New York a decade before Arthur Ashe won the 1968 U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
Althea Gibson Statue Tennis
FILE - In this July 11, 1957, file photo, Althea Gibson, who won the Wimbledon women's singles and doubles, smiles and waves to the crowd from the backseat of the open car during a ticker-tape parade up Broadway in New York. Gibson basked in a ticker tape parade in New York a decade before Arthur Ashe won the 1968 U.S. Open. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Romania's Simona Halep will be seeking a second straight Grand Slam title at the US Open after beating Serena Williams in the final at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/MATTHEW STOCKMAN)
Romania's Simona Halep will be seeking a second straight Grand Slam title at the US Open after beating Serena Williams in the final at Wimbledon
Romania's Simona Halep will be seeking a second straight Grand Slam title at the US Open after beating Serena Williams in the final at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/MATTHEW STOCKMAN)
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep of Romania smiles during an interview session friday at the US Open (AFP Photo/Emilee Chinn)
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep of Romania smiles during an interview session friday at the US Open
Reigning Wimbledon champion Simona Halep of Romania smiles during an interview session friday at the US Open (AFP Photo/Emilee Chinn)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-GAUFF
ARCHIVO - En esta foto del 5 de julio de 2019, la estadounidense Coco Gauff reacciona tras ganar un punto ante la eslovena Polona Hercog en la tercera ronda del torneo de Wimbledon. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
FILE -In this July 9, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE -In this July 9, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US Open Gauff Young Americans Tennis
FILE - In this July 5, 2019, file photo, United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff reacts after winning a point against Slovenia's Polona Hercog in a Women's singles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff is just 15 but got into the main draw for the U.S. Open, which starts next week, thanks to a wild-card invitation after her surprising run to the fourth round at Wimbledon. She is one of a group of young Americans making strides in tennis lately. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2018, file photo, Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, returns to Daniil Medvedev, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Tsitsipas goes into the U.S. Open ranked eighth and hoping to rebound from a first-round exit at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
US Open Mens Capsules Tennis
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2018, file photo, Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, returns to Daniil Medvedev, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Tsitsipas goes into the U.S. Open ranked eighth and hoping to rebound from a first-round exit at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2018, file photo, Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, returns to Daniil Medvedev, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Tsitsipas goes into the U.S. Open ranked eighth and hoping to rebound from a first-round exit at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
US Open Mens Capsules Tennis
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2018, file photo, Stefanos Tsitsipas, of Greece, returns to Daniil Medvedev, of Russia, during the second round of the U.S. Open tennis tournament in New York. Tsitsipas goes into the U.S. Open ranked eighth and hoping to rebound from a first-round exit at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
File - In this July 13, 2019, file photo, Romania's Simona Halep kisses the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Halep enters the U.S. Open ranked No. 4 as she comes off a championship at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
US Open Womens Capsules Tennis
File - In this July 13, 2019, file photo, Romania's Simona Halep kisses the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Halep enters the U.S. Open ranked No. 4 as she comes off a championship at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
File - In this July 13, 2019, file photo, Romania's Simona Halep kisses the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Halep enters the U.S. Open ranked No. 4 as she comes off a championship at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
US Open Womens Capsules Tennis
File - In this July 13, 2019, file photo, Romania's Simona Halep kisses the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Halep enters the U.S. Open ranked No. 4 as she comes off a championship at Wimbledon. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
Kate has had a helping hand in her bold new look. Natasha Archer, the royal’s longtime assistant and stylist, recently returned to work following her <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-stylist-natasha-archer-royals-photographer-chris-jackson-welcome-baby-boy/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:maternity leave" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">maternity leave</a>. <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-surprises-wimbledon-fans-and-not-in-the-royal-box/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Kate took in a few matches at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Kate took in a few matches at Wimbledon</a> wearing a white midi dress by Suzannah featuring black buttons down the front. She accessorized with an Alexander McQueen belt, chic sunglasses and her signature blowout.
Kate has had a helping hand in her bold new look. Natasha Archer, the royal’s longtime assistant and stylist, recently returned to work following her maternity leave. Kate took in a few matches at Wimbledon wearing a white midi dress by Suzannah featuring black buttons down the front. She accessorized with an Alexander McQueen belt, chic sunglasses and her signature blowout.
Kate wore a custom light blue dress with a purple bow detail by Emilia Wickstead for a day date with Prince William at Wimbledon in July.
Kate wore a custom light blue dress with a purple bow detail by Emilia Wickstead for a day date with Prince William at Wimbledon in July.
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
Coco Gauff carries a ton of buzz into US Open
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
Coco Gauff carries a ton of buzz into US Open
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
Coco Gauff carries a ton of buzz into US Open
SportsPulse: Coco Gauff rocked the tennis world with a strong showing at Wimbledon, but now she heads into the U.S. Open with big expectations.
For Teen Tennis Phenom Coco Gauff, Wimbledon Is Just the Beginning
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
Tennis star Cori 'Coco' Gauff talks Wimbledon debut at 15: 'The sky isn't the limit'
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
Tennis star Cori 'Coco' Gauff talks Wimbledon debut at 15: 'The sky isn't the limit'
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
Tennis star Cori 'Coco' Gauff talks Wimbledon debut at 15: 'The sky isn't the limit'
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
Tennis star Cori 'Coco' Gauff talks Wimbledon debut at 15: 'The sky isn't the limit'
"Nightline" sat down with the teenage tennis sensation who beat Venus Williams at Wimbledon and will be playing as a wildcard at the U.S. Open to learn about how she got so good.
France's Benoit Paire, seen here during Wimbledon, is through to the third round of the ATP Winston-Salem Open after a victory over India's Prajnesh Gunneswaran (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
France's Benoit Paire, seen here during Wimbledon, is through to the third round of the ATP Winston-Salem Open after a victory over India's Prajnesh Gunneswaran
France's Benoit Paire, seen here during Wimbledon, is through to the third round of the ATP Winston-Salem Open after a victory over India's Prajnesh Gunneswaran (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated.  Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old.  As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Martina Navratilova, champion tennis player
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated. Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old. As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated.  Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old.  As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Martina Navratilova, champion tennis player
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated. Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old. As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated.  Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old.  As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Martina Navratilova, champion tennis player
Martina Navratilova is a tennis legend. Born and raised in Communist Czechoslovakia, she defected to the United States at 18 years old, leaving her family behind in order to pursue her career without the bounds of the government's restrictions on when and where she was allowed to play. Once in America, Navratilova was faced with the media's negative reaction to her outspoken, confident nature, as well as the complexities of being a gay woman, which meant losing sponsorships. Still, Navratilova dominated. Arguably the best tennis player to ever step on the court, she amassed an unmatched number of professional records over the course of a career that spanned an amazing four decades. She has won 59 Grand Slam crowns, a record nine Wimbledon singles champions. As she says, "The ball doesn't know how old I am," so even when Navratilova retired in 1994, she continued to play doubles until 2006. She was 50 years old. As one of the first openly gay sports figures, Navratilova has been a vocal advocate for equal rights and a strong supporter of many charities benefitting the LGBT community. She has received numerous awards from many of the most influential organizations within the LGBT community.
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
Wimbledon champion Andy Murray to play Winston-Salem Open next week
FILE - In this July 3, 2019, file photo, Coco Gauff celebrates after beating Slovakia's Magdalena Rybaikova in a women's singles match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff will get a chance to try for an encore: The 15-year-old from Florida received a wild-card entry Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, for the U.S. Open's main draw. It will be Gauff's second Grand Slam tournament. She made a magical run to the fourth round at Wimbledon last month after getting a wild card into the qualifying rounds there.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
US Open Coco Gauff Tennis
FILE - In this July 3, 2019, file photo, Coco Gauff celebrates after beating Slovakia's Magdalena Rybaikova in a women's singles match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff will get a chance to try for an encore: The 15-year-old from Florida received a wild-card entry Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, for the U.S. Open's main draw. It will be Gauff's second Grand Slam tournament. She made a magical run to the fourth round at Wimbledon last month after getting a wild card into the qualifying rounds there.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
FILE - In this July 3, 2019, file photo, Coco Gauff celebrates after beating Slovakia's Magdalena Rybaikova in a women's singles match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff will get a chance to try for an encore: The 15-year-old from Florida received a wild-card entry Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, for the U.S. Open's main draw. It will be Gauff's second Grand Slam tournament. She made a magical run to the fourth round at Wimbledon last month after getting a wild card into the qualifying rounds there.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
US Open Coco Gauff Tennis
FILE - In this July 3, 2019, file photo, Coco Gauff celebrates after beating Slovakia's Magdalena Rybaikova in a women's singles match at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Gauff will get a chance to try for an encore: The 15-year-old from Florida received a wild-card entry Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019, for the U.S. Open's main draw. It will be Gauff's second Grand Slam tournament. She made a magical run to the fourth round at Wimbledon last month after getting a wild card into the qualifying rounds there.(AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
The Wimbledon regular was all smiles during a visit to the Lawn Tennis Association at the National Tennis Centre in Oct. 2017. She rocked grey sneakers for the occasion, paired with black and white athletic pants, a polo shirt and a pullover sweater.
The Wimbledon regular was all smiles during a visit to the Lawn Tennis Association at the National Tennis Centre in Oct. 2017. She rocked grey sneakers for the occasion, paired with black and white athletic pants, a polo shirt and a pullover sweater.
Kate looked ready to play in silver sneakers, athletic pants and a white windbreaker at the Wimbledon Junior Tennis Initiative in Jan. 2018.
Kate looked ready to play in silver sneakers, athletic pants and a white windbreaker at the Wimbledon Junior Tennis Initiative in Jan. 2018.
Qualifier Marie Bouzkova of the Czech Republic is all smiles after reaching the WTA Toronto semi-finals after Wimbledon champion Simona Halep retired with injury after dropping the first set of their quarter-final (AFP Photo/Vaughn Ridley)
Qualifier Marie Bouzkova of the Czech Republic is all smiles after reaching the WTA Toronto semi-finals after Wimbledon champion Simona Halep retired with injury after dropping the first set of their quarter-final
Qualifier Marie Bouzkova of the Czech Republic is all smiles after reaching the WTA Toronto semi-finals after Wimbledon champion Simona Halep retired with injury after dropping the first set of their quarter-final (AFP Photo/Vaughn Ridley)
Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer after their Wimbledon semi-final (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer after their Wimbledon semi-final
Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer after their Wimbledon semi-final (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Serena Williams, here serving in her Wimbledon finals loss to Simona Halep, tops Forbes' list of sport's top women earners for a fourth straight year. (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
Serena Williams, here serving in her Wimbledon finals loss to Simona Halep, tops Forbes' list of sport's top women earners for a fourth straight year
Serena Williams, here serving in her Wimbledon finals loss to Simona Halep, tops Forbes' list of sport's top women earners for a fourth straight year. (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
Russia's Sharapova said she has made progress since Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Vaughn Ridley)
Russia's Sharapova said she has made progress since Wimbledon
Russia's Sharapova said she has made progress since Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Vaughn Ridley)
Meghan headed back to Wimbledon, this time with sister-in-law Kate and Kate's sister Pippa, for the <a href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-kate-middleton-wimbledon-sisters-in-law-date/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:women's finals" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">women's finals</a>.
Meghan headed back to Wimbledon, this time with sister-in-law Kate and Kate's sister Pippa, for the women's finals.
Meghan enjoyed some more sports action on July 4, <a href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-attends-wimbledon-watch-serena-williams/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:heading to Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">heading to Wimbledon</a> to watch her good friend Serena Williams play.
Meghan enjoyed some more sports action on July 4, heading to Wimbledon to watch her good friend Serena Williams play.
Coco Gauff, the American teen who electrified Wimbledon with a run to the last 16 in July, partnered with US teen Catherine McNally to win their first WTA titles on Saturday, capturing the Washington Open women's doubles final (AFP Photo/Rob Carr)
Coco Gauff, the American teen who electrified Wimbledon with a run to the last 16 in July, partnered with US teen Catherine McNally to win their first WTA titles on Saturday, capturing the Washington Open women's doubles final
Coco Gauff, the American teen who electrified Wimbledon with a run to the last 16 in July, partnered with US teen Catherine McNally to win their first WTA titles on Saturday, capturing the Washington Open women's doubles final (AFP Photo/Rob Carr)
The Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess of Sussex at Wimbledon - Getty Images Europe
Meghan and Kate fan wars reignite after Sussexes call on Instagram users to nominate 'Forces For Change'
The Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess of Sussex at Wimbledon - Getty Images Europe
The Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess of Sussex at Wimbledon - Getty Images Europe
Meghan and Kate fan wars reignite after Sussexes call on Instagram users to nominate 'Forces For Change'
The Duchess of Cambridge and Duchess of Sussex at Wimbledon - Getty Images Europe
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Bethanie Mattek-Sands was sidelined for more than a year after suffering a ruptured Patella tendon and dislocated kneecap at Wimbledon in 2017 (AFP Photo/ELSA)
Bethanie Mattek-Sands was sidelined for more than a year after suffering a ruptured Patella tendon and dislocated kneecap at Wimbledon in 2017
Bethanie Mattek-Sands was sidelined for more than a year after suffering a ruptured Patella tendon and dislocated kneecap at Wimbledon in 2017 (AFP Photo/ELSA)
ARCHIVO – En esta fotografía de archivo del 13 de julio de 2019 la duquesa de Sussex Meghan sonríe sentada en el palco real en la cancha central en la final de singles femeninos entre la estadounidense Serena Williams y la rumana Simona Halep en el campeonato de Wimbledon en Londres. Meghan fue invitada a editar el número de septiembre de la edición británica de Vogue con el tema "fuerzas de cambio" que saldrá a la venta el 2 de agosto, informaron autoridades reales. La revista incluye una conversación entre Meghan y la ex primera dama Michelle Obama. (Foto AP/Ben Curtis, archivo)
MEGHAN-VOGUE
ARCHIVO – En esta fotografía de archivo del 13 de julio de 2019 la duquesa de Sussex Meghan sonríe sentada en el palco real en la cancha central en la final de singles femeninos entre la estadounidense Serena Williams y la rumana Simona Halep en el campeonato de Wimbledon en Londres. Meghan fue invitada a editar el número de septiembre de la edición británica de Vogue con el tema "fuerzas de cambio" que saldrá a la venta el 2 de agosto, informaron autoridades reales. La revista incluye una conversación entre Meghan y la ex primera dama Michelle Obama. (Foto AP/Ben Curtis, archivo)
Britain's Andy Murray, who played mixed doubles at Wimbledon with Serena Williams as he continued his return from hip surgery, says he's close to a return to singles action (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
Britain's Andy Murray, who played mixed doubles at Wimbledon with Serena Williams as he continued his return from hip surgery, says he's close to a return to singles action
Britain's Andy Murray, who played mixed doubles at Wimbledon with Serena Williams as he continued his return from hip surgery, says he's close to a return to singles action (AFP Photo/Ben STANSALL)
El español Rafael Nadal saluda al público luego de perder contra el suizo Roger Federer en la semifinal de Wimbledon, en Londres, el viernes 12 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
COPA ROGERS
El español Rafael Nadal saluda al público luego de perder contra el suizo Roger Federer en la semifinal de Wimbledon, en Londres, el viernes 12 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
Britain Meghan Vogue
FILE - In this July 13, 2019 file photo, Kate, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex smiles while sitting in the Royal Box on Centre Court to watch the women's singles final match between Serena Williams, of the United States, and Romania's Simona Halep on at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London. Meghan has guest edited the September issue of British Vogue with the theme "Forces for Change." Royal officials say the issue coming out Aug. 2 features “change-makers united by their fearlessness in breaking barriers” and includes a conversation between Meghan and former U.S. first lady Michelle Obama. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
US teen Coco Gauff, who reached the fourth round at Wimbledon earlier this month, won her first match since the impressive Grand Slam run on Saturday in qualifying at the WTA Washington Open (AFP Photo/Mitchell Layton)
US teen Coco Gauff, who reached the fourth round at Wimbledon earlier this month, won her first match since the impressive Grand Slam run on Saturday in qualifying at the WTA Washington Open
US teen Coco Gauff, who reached the fourth round at Wimbledon earlier this month, won her first match since the impressive Grand Slam run on Saturday in qualifying at the WTA Washington Open (AFP Photo/Mitchell Layton)
US 15-year-old Coco Gauff, coming off a fourth-round run at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam main draw debut, said Friday she will play in weekend qualifying at the WTA Washingotn Open (AFP Photo/Mitchell Layton)
US 15-year-old Coco Gauff, coming off a fourth-round run at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam main draw debut, said Friday she will play in weekend qualifying at the WTA Washingotn Open
US 15-year-old Coco Gauff, coming off a fourth-round run at Wimbledon in her Grand Slam main draw debut, said Friday she will play in weekend qualifying at the WTA Washingotn Open (AFP Photo/Mitchell Layton)
Thibaut Pinot is worried about his lawn. The heatwave is bound to be taking a toll back home, and although it’s being looked after by his family, no one treats it quite like he does. He’s thinking about his animals too. His goats, his sheep, his donkey. Most of them are rescued, brought to live with him in Melisey – population 1,680 – where he has always lived and where his father is the mayor. And he’s missing the pond. Pinot likes nothing more than to spend a day fishing, whiling away hours in solitude.The thing about Pinot, one of the best professional cyclists in the world, is that cycling is surprisingly far down his list of endeavours. Scroll through his social media and, yes, you’ll see a few tweets about the Tour de France, in which he is currently fifth and hoping to be the first French winner since 1985, but they are scattered between calls to end bullfighting, petitions to save the lions and memes about polar bears. Another tweet reads: “Mon paradis,” next to three hearts-for-eyes emojis, with a link to a particularly terrific fishing lake. No, Pinot is not your typical cyclist. For a start, he doesn’t really care for the Tour de France, for its pageantry and fanfare or its helicopter whirring overhead all day as he rides (he also worries it disturbs the animals). He has a complex relationship with his exuberantly French directeur sportif, Marc Madiot, who sat with his arm behind Pinot on a recent press day like a mafia boss protecting his first-born son. Madiot’s methods can best be described as deliberately anti-Team Sky, built on passion and instinct rather than science and cold logic. It fits well with the emotional Pinot, who doesn’t like plans.Then there’s his relationship with the French media and public. You suspect it doesn’t help that L’Equipe’s front pages, when strung together over these past three weeks, read like a psychotic man shouting at the sea. ‘Now or never,’ ran the headline before the Tour, referring to Pinot’s hopes in the rare absence of rivals like Chris Froome; ‘The broken hope,’ it wallowed in giant font after he lost time on stage eight; ‘The strong man,’ it trumpeted this week after he conquered the Pyrenees. He was held up as France’s next great hope when he announced himself by winning a stage in 2012, a lot to take for a sensitive 22-year-old who was then the youngest rider in the peloton. He came through in a new generation of French talent with Romain Bardet and Romain Sicard, and although he and Bardet have both been on the Tour de France podium, they have still not fulfilled those huge early expectations. Now 29, it is hard to know whether Pinot really wants the yellow jersey on his shoulders or just thinks it will get the world off his back.On Thursday morning, Le Dauphine Libere ran the headline ‘Alaphilippe, Pinot and the three giants’. One of those three giants in the Alps is gone now – the brutal stage 18 – and with two days left, both Pinot and his compatriot Julian Alaphilippe are still in with a chance of winning the race, along with a handful of others including the reigning champion, Geraint Thomas. France has two great hopes of ending 34 years of hurt, and they couldn’t be more different.Alaphilippe is cool and relaxed off the bike, and a rockstar on it. He attacks out of his seat with his tongue out and his handlebars swaying, engaging with fans and feeding off them. He has dealt masterfully with the media barrage that comes with a Frenchman wearing yellow, playing up to the crowd while playing down expectations. Like Britain’s long obsession with Wimbledon there is a yearning in France for a home-bred champion, and Alaphilippe’s thrilling racing, as well as the gradual emergence of Pinot, has stirred a nation, with viewing figures at their highest in years. “Something is happening in this country,” said Alaphilippe after stage 18. “I see the public, the media, I see the messages. People are getting crazy, and I understand that they dream that it works out. Now I imagine a little bit that it could work out, but I’m realistic.”Alaphilippe is fighting out of his comfort zone, a one-day classics specialist who has surpassed all expectations to be leading a three-week stage race full of high climbs. He has taken everyone by surprise. “I’ve tried to distance myself the most I can from what’s happening [outside the race], but I realise it’s an incredible Tour de France for me. Two stage wins including a time trial, and now I’m fighting with the biggest climbers still with two days before Paris. I prefer to say ‘expectations’ rather than ‘pressure’, because I’m used to pressure and it motivates me. This is different.”He and Pinot could not be coming at this finale from places further apart. Alaphilippe is a puncheur, Pinot is a climber. Alaphilippe is defending the jersey, Pinot is attacking the race. Alaphilippe is alone in the mountains, Pinot has climbers in support. Just about the only thing they have in common is being French.“We have a good relationship,” says Alaphilippe. “We are not the best friends because we don’t see each other much off the bike – only sometimes in the national team. Thibaut is a very nice guy and a really great rider. We respect each other, we are happy when the other one performs. It’s a super Tour for him, for me, for French cycling. If I crack, I hope the yellow jersey will belong to Thibaut Pinot.”Pinot spent last year focusing on his favourite race, the Giro d’Italia, where he was set for a podium finish until his unreliable body gave way. It meant he watched the Tour de France from the farm, and for the first time it stirred in him a feeling of wanting to be there – of needing to be there. Now here he is, away from his lawn and his animals and his pond, with a serious chance of winning the yellow jersey. And Pinot does have one small advantage: he spent much of the off-season in Tignes, where stage 19 culminates, renting an apartment with some friends to train on the hard Alpine climbs. No one knows Friday’s final climb better than he does. If that sounds like unusually meticulous preparation for a man who prefers to stick to the things he likes in life rather than other people’s plans, well, it wasn’t. The rest of his FDJ team gathered for training camps in Majorca or Tenerife, but Pinot doesn’t like the heat.
Tour de France 2019: Thibaut Pinot and Julian Alaphilippe carry the hopes of a nation on very different shoulders
Thibaut Pinot is worried about his lawn. The heatwave is bound to be taking a toll back home, and although it’s being looked after by his family, no one treats it quite like he does. He’s thinking about his animals too. His goats, his sheep, his donkey. Most of them are rescued, brought to live with him in Melisey – population 1,680 – where he has always lived and where his father is the mayor. And he’s missing the pond. Pinot likes nothing more than to spend a day fishing, whiling away hours in solitude.The thing about Pinot, one of the best professional cyclists in the world, is that cycling is surprisingly far down his list of endeavours. Scroll through his social media and, yes, you’ll see a few tweets about the Tour de France, in which he is currently fifth and hoping to be the first French winner since 1985, but they are scattered between calls to end bullfighting, petitions to save the lions and memes about polar bears. Another tweet reads: “Mon paradis,” next to three hearts-for-eyes emojis, with a link to a particularly terrific fishing lake. No, Pinot is not your typical cyclist. For a start, he doesn’t really care for the Tour de France, for its pageantry and fanfare or its helicopter whirring overhead all day as he rides (he also worries it disturbs the animals). He has a complex relationship with his exuberantly French directeur sportif, Marc Madiot, who sat with his arm behind Pinot on a recent press day like a mafia boss protecting his first-born son. Madiot’s methods can best be described as deliberately anti-Team Sky, built on passion and instinct rather than science and cold logic. It fits well with the emotional Pinot, who doesn’t like plans.Then there’s his relationship with the French media and public. You suspect it doesn’t help that L’Equipe’s front pages, when strung together over these past three weeks, read like a psychotic man shouting at the sea. ‘Now or never,’ ran the headline before the Tour, referring to Pinot’s hopes in the rare absence of rivals like Chris Froome; ‘The broken hope,’ it wallowed in giant font after he lost time on stage eight; ‘The strong man,’ it trumpeted this week after he conquered the Pyrenees. He was held up as France’s next great hope when he announced himself by winning a stage in 2012, a lot to take for a sensitive 22-year-old who was then the youngest rider in the peloton. He came through in a new generation of French talent with Romain Bardet and Romain Sicard, and although he and Bardet have both been on the Tour de France podium, they have still not fulfilled those huge early expectations. Now 29, it is hard to know whether Pinot really wants the yellow jersey on his shoulders or just thinks it will get the world off his back.On Thursday morning, Le Dauphine Libere ran the headline ‘Alaphilippe, Pinot and the three giants’. One of those three giants in the Alps is gone now – the brutal stage 18 – and with two days left, both Pinot and his compatriot Julian Alaphilippe are still in with a chance of winning the race, along with a handful of others including the reigning champion, Geraint Thomas. France has two great hopes of ending 34 years of hurt, and they couldn’t be more different.Alaphilippe is cool and relaxed off the bike, and a rockstar on it. He attacks out of his seat with his tongue out and his handlebars swaying, engaging with fans and feeding off them. He has dealt masterfully with the media barrage that comes with a Frenchman wearing yellow, playing up to the crowd while playing down expectations. Like Britain’s long obsession with Wimbledon there is a yearning in France for a home-bred champion, and Alaphilippe’s thrilling racing, as well as the gradual emergence of Pinot, has stirred a nation, with viewing figures at their highest in years. “Something is happening in this country,” said Alaphilippe after stage 18. “I see the public, the media, I see the messages. People are getting crazy, and I understand that they dream that it works out. Now I imagine a little bit that it could work out, but I’m realistic.”Alaphilippe is fighting out of his comfort zone, a one-day classics specialist who has surpassed all expectations to be leading a three-week stage race full of high climbs. He has taken everyone by surprise. “I’ve tried to distance myself the most I can from what’s happening [outside the race], but I realise it’s an incredible Tour de France for me. Two stage wins including a time trial, and now I’m fighting with the biggest climbers still with two days before Paris. I prefer to say ‘expectations’ rather than ‘pressure’, because I’m used to pressure and it motivates me. This is different.”He and Pinot could not be coming at this finale from places further apart. Alaphilippe is a puncheur, Pinot is a climber. Alaphilippe is defending the jersey, Pinot is attacking the race. Alaphilippe is alone in the mountains, Pinot has climbers in support. Just about the only thing they have in common is being French.“We have a good relationship,” says Alaphilippe. “We are not the best friends because we don’t see each other much off the bike – only sometimes in the national team. Thibaut is a very nice guy and a really great rider. We respect each other, we are happy when the other one performs. It’s a super Tour for him, for me, for French cycling. If I crack, I hope the yellow jersey will belong to Thibaut Pinot.”Pinot spent last year focusing on his favourite race, the Giro d’Italia, where he was set for a podium finish until his unreliable body gave way. It meant he watched the Tour de France from the farm, and for the first time it stirred in him a feeling of wanting to be there – of needing to be there. Now here he is, away from his lawn and his animals and his pond, with a serious chance of winning the yellow jersey. And Pinot does have one small advantage: he spent much of the off-season in Tignes, where stage 19 culminates, renting an apartment with some friends to train on the hard Alpine climbs. No one knows Friday’s final climb better than he does. If that sounds like unusually meticulous preparation for a man who prefers to stick to the things he likes in life rather than other people’s plans, well, it wasn’t. The rest of his FDJ team gathered for training camps in Majorca or Tenerife, but Pinot doesn’t like the heat.
Thibaut Pinot is worried about his lawn. The heatwave is bound to be taking a toll back home, and although it’s being looked after by his family, no one treats it quite like he does. He’s thinking about his animals too. His goats, his sheep, his donkey. Most of them are rescued, brought to live with him in Melisey – population 1,680 – where he has always lived and where his father is the mayor. And he’s missing the pond. Pinot likes nothing more than to spend a day fishing, whiling away hours in solitude.The thing about Pinot, one of the best professional cyclists in the world, is that cycling is surprisingly far down his list of endeavours. Scroll through his social media and, yes, you’ll see a few tweets about the Tour de France, in which he is currently fifth and hoping to be the first French winner since 1985, but they are scattered between calls to end bullfighting, petitions to save the lions and memes about polar bears. Another tweet reads: “Mon paradis,” next to three hearts-for-eyes emojis, with a link to a particularly terrific fishing lake. No, Pinot is not your typical cyclist. For a start, he doesn’t really care for the Tour de France, for its pageantry and fanfare or its helicopter whirring overhead all day as he rides (he also worries it disturbs the animals). He has a complex relationship with his exuberantly French directeur sportif, Marc Madiot, who sat with his arm behind Pinot on a recent press day like a mafia boss protecting his first-born son. Madiot’s methods can best be described as deliberately anti-Team Sky, built on passion and instinct rather than science and cold logic. It fits well with the emotional Pinot, who doesn’t like plans.Then there’s his relationship with the French media and public. You suspect it doesn’t help that L’Equipe’s front pages, when strung together over these past three weeks, read like a psychotic man shouting at the sea. ‘Now or never,’ ran the headline before the Tour, referring to Pinot’s hopes in the rare absence of rivals like Chris Froome; ‘The broken hope,’ it wallowed in giant font after he lost time on stage eight; ‘The strong man,’ it trumpeted this week after he conquered the Pyrenees. He was held up as France’s next great hope when he announced himself by winning a stage in 2012, a lot to take for a sensitive 22-year-old who was then the youngest rider in the peloton. He came through in a new generation of French talent with Romain Bardet and Romain Sicard, and although he and Bardet have both been on the Tour de France podium, they have still not fulfilled those huge early expectations. Now 29, it is hard to know whether Pinot really wants the yellow jersey on his shoulders or just thinks it will get the world off his back.On Thursday morning, Le Dauphine Libere ran the headline ‘Alaphilippe, Pinot and the three giants’. One of those three giants in the Alps is gone now – the brutal stage 18 – and with two days left, both Pinot and his compatriot Julian Alaphilippe are still in with a chance of winning the race, along with a handful of others including the reigning champion, Geraint Thomas. France has two great hopes of ending 34 years of hurt, and they couldn’t be more different.Alaphilippe is cool and relaxed off the bike, and a rockstar on it. He attacks out of his seat with his tongue out and his handlebars swaying, engaging with fans and feeding off them. He has dealt masterfully with the media barrage that comes with a Frenchman wearing yellow, playing up to the crowd while playing down expectations. Like Britain’s long obsession with Wimbledon there is a yearning in France for a home-bred champion, and Alaphilippe’s thrilling racing, as well as the gradual emergence of Pinot, has stirred a nation, with viewing figures at their highest in years. “Something is happening in this country,” said Alaphilippe after stage 18. “I see the public, the media, I see the messages. People are getting crazy, and I understand that they dream that it works out. Now I imagine a little bit that it could work out, but I’m realistic.”Alaphilippe is fighting out of his comfort zone, a one-day classics specialist who has surpassed all expectations to be leading a three-week stage race full of high climbs. He has taken everyone by surprise. “I’ve tried to distance myself the most I can from what’s happening [outside the race], but I realise it’s an incredible Tour de France for me. Two stage wins including a time trial, and now I’m fighting with the biggest climbers still with two days before Paris. I prefer to say ‘expectations’ rather than ‘pressure’, because I’m used to pressure and it motivates me. This is different.”He and Pinot could not be coming at this finale from places further apart. Alaphilippe is a puncheur, Pinot is a climber. Alaphilippe is defending the jersey, Pinot is attacking the race. Alaphilippe is alone in the mountains, Pinot has climbers in support. Just about the only thing they have in common is being French.“We have a good relationship,” says Alaphilippe. “We are not the best friends because we don’t see each other much off the bike – only sometimes in the national team. Thibaut is a very nice guy and a really great rider. We respect each other, we are happy when the other one performs. It’s a super Tour for him, for me, for French cycling. If I crack, I hope the yellow jersey will belong to Thibaut Pinot.”Pinot spent last year focusing on his favourite race, the Giro d’Italia, where he was set for a podium finish until his unreliable body gave way. It meant he watched the Tour de France from the farm, and for the first time it stirred in him a feeling of wanting to be there – of needing to be there. Now here he is, away from his lawn and his animals and his pond, with a serious chance of winning the yellow jersey. And Pinot does have one small advantage: he spent much of the off-season in Tignes, where stage 19 culminates, renting an apartment with some friends to train on the hard Alpine climbs. No one knows Friday’s final climb better than he does. If that sounds like unusually meticulous preparation for a man who prefers to stick to the things he likes in life rather than other people’s plans, well, it wasn’t. The rest of his FDJ team gathered for training camps in Majorca or Tenerife, but Pinot doesn’t like the heat.
Tour de France 2019: Thibaut Pinot and Julian Alaphilippe carry the hopes of a nation on very different shoulders
Thibaut Pinot is worried about his lawn. The heatwave is bound to be taking a toll back home, and although it’s being looked after by his family, no one treats it quite like he does. He’s thinking about his animals too. His goats, his sheep, his donkey. Most of them are rescued, brought to live with him in Melisey – population 1,680 – where he has always lived and where his father is the mayor. And he’s missing the pond. Pinot likes nothing more than to spend a day fishing, whiling away hours in solitude.The thing about Pinot, one of the best professional cyclists in the world, is that cycling is surprisingly far down his list of endeavours. Scroll through his social media and, yes, you’ll see a few tweets about the Tour de France, in which he is currently fifth and hoping to be the first French winner since 1985, but they are scattered between calls to end bullfighting, petitions to save the lions and memes about polar bears. Another tweet reads: “Mon paradis,” next to three hearts-for-eyes emojis, with a link to a particularly terrific fishing lake. No, Pinot is not your typical cyclist. For a start, he doesn’t really care for the Tour de France, for its pageantry and fanfare or its helicopter whirring overhead all day as he rides (he also worries it disturbs the animals). He has a complex relationship with his exuberantly French directeur sportif, Marc Madiot, who sat with his arm behind Pinot on a recent press day like a mafia boss protecting his first-born son. Madiot’s methods can best be described as deliberately anti-Team Sky, built on passion and instinct rather than science and cold logic. It fits well with the emotional Pinot, who doesn’t like plans.Then there’s his relationship with the French media and public. You suspect it doesn’t help that L’Equipe’s front pages, when strung together over these past three weeks, read like a psychotic man shouting at the sea. ‘Now or never,’ ran the headline before the Tour, referring to Pinot’s hopes in the rare absence of rivals like Chris Froome; ‘The broken hope,’ it wallowed in giant font after he lost time on stage eight; ‘The strong man,’ it trumpeted this week after he conquered the Pyrenees. He was held up as France’s next great hope when he announced himself by winning a stage in 2012, a lot to take for a sensitive 22-year-old who was then the youngest rider in the peloton. He came through in a new generation of French talent with Romain Bardet and Romain Sicard, and although he and Bardet have both been on the Tour de France podium, they have still not fulfilled those huge early expectations. Now 29, it is hard to know whether Pinot really wants the yellow jersey on his shoulders or just thinks it will get the world off his back.On Thursday morning, Le Dauphine Libere ran the headline ‘Alaphilippe, Pinot and the three giants’. One of those three giants in the Alps is gone now – the brutal stage 18 – and with two days left, both Pinot and his compatriot Julian Alaphilippe are still in with a chance of winning the race, along with a handful of others including the reigning champion, Geraint Thomas. France has two great hopes of ending 34 years of hurt, and they couldn’t be more different.Alaphilippe is cool and relaxed off the bike, and a rockstar on it. He attacks out of his seat with his tongue out and his handlebars swaying, engaging with fans and feeding off them. He has dealt masterfully with the media barrage that comes with a Frenchman wearing yellow, playing up to the crowd while playing down expectations. Like Britain’s long obsession with Wimbledon there is a yearning in France for a home-bred champion, and Alaphilippe’s thrilling racing, as well as the gradual emergence of Pinot, has stirred a nation, with viewing figures at their highest in years. “Something is happening in this country,” said Alaphilippe after stage 18. “I see the public, the media, I see the messages. People are getting crazy, and I understand that they dream that it works out. Now I imagine a little bit that it could work out, but I’m realistic.”Alaphilippe is fighting out of his comfort zone, a one-day classics specialist who has surpassed all expectations to be leading a three-week stage race full of high climbs. He has taken everyone by surprise. “I’ve tried to distance myself the most I can from what’s happening [outside the race], but I realise it’s an incredible Tour de France for me. Two stage wins including a time trial, and now I’m fighting with the biggest climbers still with two days before Paris. I prefer to say ‘expectations’ rather than ‘pressure’, because I’m used to pressure and it motivates me. This is different.”He and Pinot could not be coming at this finale from places further apart. Alaphilippe is a puncheur, Pinot is a climber. Alaphilippe is defending the jersey, Pinot is attacking the race. Alaphilippe is alone in the mountains, Pinot has climbers in support. Just about the only thing they have in common is being French.“We have a good relationship,” says Alaphilippe. “We are not the best friends because we don’t see each other much off the bike – only sometimes in the national team. Thibaut is a very nice guy and a really great rider. We respect each other, we are happy when the other one performs. It’s a super Tour for him, for me, for French cycling. If I crack, I hope the yellow jersey will belong to Thibaut Pinot.”Pinot spent last year focusing on his favourite race, the Giro d’Italia, where he was set for a podium finish until his unreliable body gave way. It meant he watched the Tour de France from the farm, and for the first time it stirred in him a feeling of wanting to be there – of needing to be there. Now here he is, away from his lawn and his animals and his pond, with a serious chance of winning the yellow jersey. And Pinot does have one small advantage: he spent much of the off-season in Tignes, where stage 19 culminates, renting an apartment with some friends to train on the hard Alpine climbs. No one knows Friday’s final climb better than he does. If that sounds like unusually meticulous preparation for a man who prefers to stick to the things he likes in life rather than other people’s plans, well, it wasn’t. The rest of his FDJ team gathered for training camps in Majorca or Tenerife, but Pinot doesn’t like the heat.
El serbio Novak Djokovic inicia su festejo tras la victoria sobre el suizo Roger Federer en la final de hombres en sencillos de Wimbledon, en Londres, el domingo 14 de julio de 2019.. (AP Foto/Tim Ireland)
MONTREAL-DJOKOVIC BAJA
El serbio Novak Djokovic inicia su festejo tras la victoria sobre el suizo Roger Federer en la final de hombres en sencillos de Wimbledon, en Londres, el domingo 14 de julio de 2019.. (AP Foto/Tim Ireland)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, who beat Roger Federer in the Wimbledon final earlier this month for his 16th Grand Slam singles crown, has withdrawn from next month's ATP Canada Masters event, the Montreal tournament announced Thursday (AFP Photo/Laurence Griffiths)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, who beat Roger Federer in the Wimbledon final earlier this month for his 16th Grand Slam singles crown, has withdrawn from next month's ATP Canada Masters event, the Montreal tournament announced Thursday
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, who beat Roger Federer in the Wimbledon final earlier this month for his 16th Grand Slam singles crown, has withdrawn from next month's ATP Canada Masters event, the Montreal tournament announced Thursday (AFP Photo/Laurence Griffiths)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic lifts the trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic lifts the trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Shaun Botterill/Getty ImagesThe royal rumor mill has pushed the theory that Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle are bitter foes since the American actress joined the royal family last summer. And the latest pics of the two from Wimbledon did little to throw water on the apparent firestorm between them. Other shots of Kate and Meghan and the kids at a polo match even had many outlets calling the long-lens shots choreographed and set up.But a new report published in the print edition of Hello! Magazine, quoted widely in the online British press, tells a far different story. The Hello! piece quotes a source close to both duchesses who says that the arrival of Meghan and Prince Harry’s son Archie Harrison Mountbatten Windsor has brought the women closer together, even allowing it to “evolve” into something of a warm sisterhood. “Kate was a great source of support to Meghan in the days leading up to Archie’s birth and, despite reports of a rift, they are family and have a really lovely friendship.”New Royal Baby Name Revealed: Archie Harrison!The source added that Archie’s arrival has meant that Kate and Meghan have much more in common and that the two “talk and text regularly.”“Kate has wanted to make sure Meghan has felt welcome into the family,” the magazine reports, despite rumors to the contrary. The trouble between Kate and Meghan reportedly dates back to the bridesmaid dress fitting last summer when a remark Meghan made to “an emotional” Kate who had just given birth to her third baby, Prince Louis. Since then, a number of other events, including Prince Harry and Meghan’s move to Frogmore Cottage and the length of time it took for Prince William and Kate to be officially introduced to baby Archie, have only fed the rumor mill. And when Harry and Meghan left the Royal Foundation charity shared with William and Kate, things looked dire indeed. Royal watcher Carolyn Durand told Elle magazine that the whole royal rift saga has been overblown from the start. “Catherine and Meghan enjoy seeing each other, and motherhood has definitely brought them closer together,” Durand said she was told by an insider. Regarding the authenticity of their friendship at Wimbledon, Durand says it was real. “Kate and Meghan had always planned to attend the final together,” she said. “Not only is it something that they enjoy, it’s also a chance to remind people that the tabloid stories about their relationship have been wide of the mark.” At least until the next alleged rift is revealed.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Reportedly Ended Rift By Bonding Over Royal Baby
Shaun Botterill/Getty ImagesThe royal rumor mill has pushed the theory that Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle are bitter foes since the American actress joined the royal family last summer. And the latest pics of the two from Wimbledon did little to throw water on the apparent firestorm between them. Other shots of Kate and Meghan and the kids at a polo match even had many outlets calling the long-lens shots choreographed and set up.But a new report published in the print edition of Hello! Magazine, quoted widely in the online British press, tells a far different story. The Hello! piece quotes a source close to both duchesses who says that the arrival of Meghan and Prince Harry’s son Archie Harrison Mountbatten Windsor has brought the women closer together, even allowing it to “evolve” into something of a warm sisterhood. “Kate was a great source of support to Meghan in the days leading up to Archie’s birth and, despite reports of a rift, they are family and have a really lovely friendship.”New Royal Baby Name Revealed: Archie Harrison!The source added that Archie’s arrival has meant that Kate and Meghan have much more in common and that the two “talk and text regularly.”“Kate has wanted to make sure Meghan has felt welcome into the family,” the magazine reports, despite rumors to the contrary. The trouble between Kate and Meghan reportedly dates back to the bridesmaid dress fitting last summer when a remark Meghan made to “an emotional” Kate who had just given birth to her third baby, Prince Louis. Since then, a number of other events, including Prince Harry and Meghan’s move to Frogmore Cottage and the length of time it took for Prince William and Kate to be officially introduced to baby Archie, have only fed the rumor mill. And when Harry and Meghan left the Royal Foundation charity shared with William and Kate, things looked dire indeed. Royal watcher Carolyn Durand told Elle magazine that the whole royal rift saga has been overblown from the start. “Catherine and Meghan enjoy seeing each other, and motherhood has definitely brought them closer together,” Durand said she was told by an insider. Regarding the authenticity of their friendship at Wimbledon, Durand says it was real. “Kate and Meghan had always planned to attend the final together,” she said. “Not only is it something that they enjoy, it’s also a chance to remind people that the tabloid stories about their relationship have been wide of the mark.” At least until the next alleged rift is revealed.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
Beatriz Haddad Maia celebrates beating Garbine Muguruza at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Beatriz Haddad Maia celebrates beating Garbine Muguruza at Wimbledon
Beatriz Haddad Maia celebrates beating Garbine Muguruza at Wimbledon (AFP Photo/Adrian DENNIS)
Brazil's top-ranked women's tennis player Beatriz Haddad Maia has been provisionally suspended after failing a drug test, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) has announced.Haddad Maia, the world number 99, provided a sample for testing on June 4 during the Croatia Open that was found to contain selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).SARMs, which have similar properties to anabolic steroids, are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.The Brazilian qualified for the Wimbledon main draw in July and went on to beat former champion Garbine Muguruza in the first round.She was informed of the finding on July 12, eight days after being beaten by Britain's Harriet Dart in the second round, and her provisional suspension came into effect on Monday.The ITF said: "Ms. Haddad Maia had (and retains) the right to apply to the Chair of the Independent Tribunal convened to hear her case why the provisional suspension should not be imposed, but has chosen not to exercise that right to date.
Wimbledon qualifier Beatriz Haddad Maia suspended after failing drugs test
Brazil's top-ranked women's tennis player Beatriz Haddad Maia has been provisionally suspended after failing a drug test, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) has announced.Haddad Maia, the world number 99, provided a sample for testing on June 4 during the Croatia Open that was found to contain selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).SARMs, which have similar properties to anabolic steroids, are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.The Brazilian qualified for the Wimbledon main draw in July and went on to beat former champion Garbine Muguruza in the first round.She was informed of the finding on July 12, eight days after being beaten by Britain's Harriet Dart in the second round, and her provisional suspension came into effect on Monday.The ITF said: "Ms. Haddad Maia had (and retains) the right to apply to the Chair of the Independent Tribunal convened to hear her case why the provisional suspension should not be imposed, but has chosen not to exercise that right to date.
Brazil's top-ranked women's tennis player Beatriz Haddad Maia has been provisionally suspended after failing a drug test, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) has announced.Haddad Maia, the world number 99, provided a sample for testing on June 4 during the Croatia Open that was found to contain selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).SARMs, which have similar properties to anabolic steroids, are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.The Brazilian qualified for the Wimbledon main draw in July and went on to beat former champion Garbine Muguruza in the first round.She was informed of the finding on July 12, eight days after being beaten by Britain's Harriet Dart in the second round, and her provisional suspension came into effect on Monday.The ITF said: "Ms. Haddad Maia had (and retains) the right to apply to the Chair of the Independent Tribunal convened to hear her case why the provisional suspension should not be imposed, but has chosen not to exercise that right to date.
Wimbledon qualifier Beatriz Haddad Maia suspended after failing drugs test
Brazil's top-ranked women's tennis player Beatriz Haddad Maia has been provisionally suspended after failing a drug test, the International Tennis Federation (ITF) has announced.Haddad Maia, the world number 99, provided a sample for testing on June 4 during the Croatia Open that was found to contain selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).SARMs, which have similar properties to anabolic steroids, are prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency.The Brazilian qualified for the Wimbledon main draw in July and went on to beat former champion Garbine Muguruza in the first round.She was informed of the finding on July 12, eight days after being beaten by Britain's Harriet Dart in the second round, and her provisional suspension came into effect on Monday.The ITF said: "Ms. Haddad Maia had (and retains) the right to apply to the Chair of the Independent Tribunal convened to hear her case why the provisional suspension should not be imposed, but has chosen not to exercise that right to date.
United States' Serena Williams talks to playing partner Britain's Andy Murray during a mixed doubles match against Unites States' Nicole Melichar and Brazil's Bruno Soares on day nine of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Wednesday, July 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
United States' Serena Williams talks to playing partner Britain's Andy Murray during a mixed doubles match against Unites States' Nicole Melichar and Brazil's Bruno Soares on day nine of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Wednesday, July 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
United States' Serena Williams talks to playing partner Britain's Andy Murray during a mixed doubles match against Unites States' Nicole Melichar and Brazil's Bruno Soares on day nine of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Wednesday, July 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
United States' Serena Williams talks to playing partner Britain's Andy Murray during a mixed doubles match against Unites States' Nicole Melichar and Brazil's Bruno Soares on day nine of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Wednesday, July 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Andy Murray will continue to play doubles as part of his comeback and will line up alongside brother Jamie in the doubles at the Citi Open in Washington next week.After defeat in the Wimbledon mixed doubles third-round with Serena Williams, Murray initially cast doubt on whether he would continue to play doubles as part of his return from a career-threatening hip injury.“During a hip resurfacing operation ... a lot of muscles are severed and stitched back up so it takes a lot of time and needs hard physical work to recover properly,” Murray wrote in his column for the BBC after Wimbledon.“I need to get those muscles back to a certain level before I can go on a singles court and try to play best of five sets, otherwise I could do damage if the strength isn’t there.”“I’m happy to be pain free and want to get my hip as good as it can be. Once it is strong again I can get back to competing,” Murray added.The event will only be Murray’s fourth on a hard court since the operation in January.
Andy Murray set to play doubles with brother Jamie at Citi Open as comeback continues
Andy Murray will continue to play doubles as part of his comeback and will line up alongside brother Jamie in the doubles at the Citi Open in Washington next week.After defeat in the Wimbledon mixed doubles third-round with Serena Williams, Murray initially cast doubt on whether he would continue to play doubles as part of his return from a career-threatening hip injury.“During a hip resurfacing operation ... a lot of muscles are severed and stitched back up so it takes a lot of time and needs hard physical work to recover properly,” Murray wrote in his column for the BBC after Wimbledon.“I need to get those muscles back to a certain level before I can go on a singles court and try to play best of five sets, otherwise I could do damage if the strength isn’t there.”“I’m happy to be pain free and want to get my hip as good as it can be. Once it is strong again I can get back to competing,” Murray added.The event will only be Murray’s fourth on a hard court since the operation in January.
Brazil's Beatriz Haddad Maia beat Garbine Muguruza at this year's Wimbledon - AP
Wimbledon qualifier Beatriz Haddad Maia fails drugs test
Brazil's Beatriz Haddad Maia beat Garbine Muguruza at this year's Wimbledon - AP
Brazil's Beatriz Haddad Maia beat Garbine Muguruza at this year's Wimbledon - AP
Wimbledon qualifier Beatriz Haddad Maia fails drugs test
Brazil's Beatriz Haddad Maia beat Garbine Muguruza at this year's Wimbledon - AP
Charlize Theron is on the edge of her seat during the men's final of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Sunday in London.
Game Face
Charlize Theron is on the edge of her seat during the men's final of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Sunday in London.
Woody Harrelson attends the Men's Singles Final at the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London on Sunday.
Love All
Woody Harrelson attends the Men's Singles Final at the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London on Sunday.
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
Homecoming celebration for Coco Gauff held in Delray Beach
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
Homecoming celebration for Coco Gauff held in Delray Beach
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
Homecoming celebration for Coco Gauff held in Delray Beach
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
Homecoming celebration for Coco Gauff held in Delray Beach
A hometown crowd celebrated Coco Gauff's successes at Wimbledon on Saturday.
In honor of the World Cup and Wimbledon, Eugenie looked back on an athletic event in her own life: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bzx4T3QFzjw/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:watching Beatrice's sports day at school" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">watching Beatrice's sports day at school</a>!
In honor of the World Cup and Wimbledon, Eugenie looked back on an athletic event in her own life: watching Beatrice's sports day at school!
wears an embroidered Zimmermann shirtdress with a white belt and white sneakers at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships with Stella Artois in London.
Jourdan Dunn
wears an embroidered Zimmermann shirtdress with a white belt and white sneakers at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships with Stella Artois in London.
in a preppy blue button-down shirt, white belted short, white sneakers and a white chainlink bag at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London.
Kendall Jenner
in a preppy blue button-down shirt, white belted short, white sneakers and a white chainlink bag at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London.
in a Dolce & Gabbana short-sleeve lace midi dress with a flounce hem paired with floral-print pumps at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships with Stella Artois in London.
Kate Beckinsale
in a Dolce & Gabbana short-sleeve lace midi dress with a flounce hem paired with floral-print pumps at the Wimbledon Tennis Championships with Stella Artois in London.
A butterfly flaps its wings in San Francisco, and a traffic policeman feels just the faintest chill on the back of his neck in Tokyo, and a mangrove sighs in the breeze in Madagascar, and a cigarette flicked from the fourth floor of an apartment block narrowly misses the back wheel of a passing cyclist in Amsterdam, and at Lord’s a cricket ball arcs through the air and lands on a cricket bat and ricochets away in the only direction that will send it unimpeded towards the boundary.Was that what happened? Well, it seems as good an explanation as any. Given unlimited time, unlimited resources and unlimited co-operation, I suppose you could concoct a more scientific explanation of the deflection that won England the Cricket World Cup last Sunday: some combination of the tension in Martin Guptill’s shoulder as he hurled the ball in, the friction of the Lord’s turf, the geometry of Ben Stokes’s dive, the speed of the outfield, the anticipation and positioning of the New Zealand fielders - notice how Colin de Grandhomme takes a step to his left at short third man, anticipating the original path of the throw, because why on earth would you anticipate anything else? You could break down that passage of play to the millisecond, model the scenario in a NASA-level of detail, and it would explain everything, and it would also explain nothing. And five days after that deflection, after that over, after that final, after that victory, perhaps this is the safest place to start: by admitting that neither you nor I nor anyone else can really explain what happened, or why.You can play around with the counterfactuals, of course. Perhaps England still win even without that deflection. Perhaps if England need six rather than two off the last ball, Stokes smashes that full toss from Trent Boult into the stands rather than bunting it safely down the ground. Then again, if the umpires apply the rules correctly, notice the batsmen hadn’t crossed at the time of Guptill’s throw and deduct a run from England’s total, Adil Rashid is on strike, and maybe Stokes doesn’t face another ball. You could drive yourself to insanity thinking about all the permutations and possibilities. So for the most part, we don’t. We tell ourselves New Zealand were robbed, that the ICC are corrupt fools, that the rules on overthrows are stupid and should be changed. Or we tell ourselves that England were clearly the best team over the tournament as a whole, over the last four years of one-day international cricket, that luck is a part of sport, that these things even themselves out, that this was a worthy reward for these fine young men, that Eoin Morgan is a cricketing genius and we’re off to the pub. We think, in other words, what we have already decided to think: what in our heart of hearts makes us feel best about ourselves.Five days on, it’s safe to say I haven’t stopped thinking about that deflection. It’s more accurate to say I can’t stop thinking about it. Watching cricket is all about loyalty and learning, about investing your time and emotions in pursuit of discovery. Writing about it is all about analysing and explaining, spotting patterns, identifying stories. So how do we process an event that fits into no rational pattern, that sits so remotely beyond the realm of anything we’ve previously experienced? Maybe it’s just the recency bias talking, but I can’t immediately think of a parallel in the history of competitive sport. Retorting that “luck has always been a part of sport” is no sort of retort at all: not this sort of luck, not this outlandish or outrageous, not this violent, not this random, not this decisive. You can win a Wimbledon final on a lucky net cord, but not unless you’re already match point up, and in any case we’ve all seen plenty of lucky net cords in our time. In football, a shot can deflect off three players and trickle miraculously into the net, but it’s still a shot, which implies an attack, which implies that the ball is already in the vicinity of the goal. Here, the only two (seemingly) realistic possibilities were that Stokes was out (one run) or Stokes was not out (two runs). Neither scenario was disadvantageous to New Zealand. Neither would have shaken their status as heavy favourites. Instead, in one freakish twist, they became underdogs. The real parallel would be Diego Maradona’s Hand of God goal against England in 1986: but instead of the goal simply being disallowed, a goal somehow being awarded to England instead. That’s the sort of reversal of fortune we’re talking here: unfathomable, completely out of nowhere and (very likely) the precise difference between victory and defeat.An NFL-loving friend offered up the Immaculate Reception of 1972, in which the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Oakland Raiders with seconds remaining, after a long pass bounced off the helmet of a defender and straight into the arms of a Steelers play for a game-winning touchdown. That certainly ticks the boxes for randomness and improbability, but not impact: for all the legacy of that play in Steelers mythology, it’s often forgotten that they lost their next game, and didn’t even make that year’s Super Bowl.So, yeah: open to suggestions. All I can really say, from my still-hazy memories of jumping up and down in the Lord’s press box, is that it’s by some distance the most remarkable thing I’ve ever seen in a decade of covering sport, and with the possible exception of the 2005 Edgbaston Test (“Jones… Bowden!”) the most preternaturally blessed I’ve ever felt in 26 years of following sport as a fan. I’m not, by the remotest stretch of anyone’s imagination, a religious man. But as the ball bobbled over the Lord’s boundary that evening, I think I understood, for the very first time, why some people are. \---I wrote earlier in the tournament, after England had beaten New Zealand at Durham to qualify for the semi-finals, that England had been extremely lucky. On one level, this was incontrovertibly true. Jason Roy should have been out early on against India, only for Virat Kohli to decline a review. Against New Zealand, Kane Williamson was freakishly run out at the non-striker’s end. In two must-win games, Morgan had won two crucial tosses against opponents who, by dint of the fixture list, had already all but qualified. None of this was to diminish England’s skill or Morgan’s gifts in the slightest: as Richie Benaud put it, captaincy is 90 per cent luck and 10 per cent skill, but don’t try it without that 10 per cent. Even so, the piece was almost unanimously panned online. “Belittling our achievements,” wrote one respondent. “Not a fair reflection of the efforts of Bairstow and Stokes,” wrote another. “More negativity unnecessarily,” wrote a third, and this was the general gist of the complaints: that in spotlighting England’s luck I was in some way selling them short, that to imply good fortune is another way of saying they don’t deserve, that they don’t belong. Why might this be the case, I wonder? Professional athletes often abhor the idea of luck. One of the mantras of elite sport is control: control your preparation, control your surroundings, control your body and your mentality. “We’re just focused on ourselves, on doing what we have to do,” you’ll often hear athletes saying in advance of a big game, and while you see where they’re coming from you also sort of want to interrogate them a little: you do realise there’s going to be an opposition out there on Saturday, don’t you?It is, in many ways, the mantra of our culture: a fallacious belief, in the absence of any conclusive evidence, that we can be the sole agents of our own success, simply by wishing it so. Believe harder. You get out what you put in. Success comes to those who work for it. Winning teams and winning athletes generally convince themselves that their triumphs are the result of their own toil alone: that they wanted it more, that they uniquely mastered the situations they were dealt, that in some important way their successes reflect their own inimitably virtuous character. Perhaps it’s a side point, but the vast majority of the hundreds of people who took issue with my piece - in fact, I would say, all but a couple of those whose demographic was discernible - were white men. Throughout virtually the entire history of this country, to have been born a white man in Britain is to have been born lucky. White men earn, on average, significantly more than both black men and white women. They’re less likely to get stopped and searched, groped and cat-called in the street. They’re less likely to be denied a job interview because of the way they look. They’ve over-represented in the law, the places that make the laws and the places that enforce the laws. British society has, by and large, been created with the white man in mind. Perhaps it’s no surprise that if you’ve been born into that sort of privilege, the very notion of luck is not just a sporting question but an existential threat, to be refuted and repudiated at all costs.\---This is the thing about luck: you can’t just let it in just a little. You can’t acknowledge this bit without acknowledging bit too. You can’t weigh up moment x without factoring in all the myriad y’s and z’s that first went into it. “The intervention of luck is like a boulder that diverts the course of a stream,” writes Ed Smith, the former cricketer and journalist who lost his own England career thanks to a duff LBW decision, but on Sunday was at Lord’s to watch the team he selected win the World Cup for the first time. “The course is changed - and stays changed forever, whatever happens downstream.”Were New Zealand unlucky to lose the World Cup final? Undoubtedly. Does that mean they deserved to win it? In many ways, it’s a moot question. Perhaps they were fortunate to be in the position to win it in the first place: fortunate to scrape into the semi-finals on net run rate, fortunate with form and injuries, fortunate to have been born both with the talent to get to a World Cup and in a country participating in it. Were England fortunate that Guptill’s throw bounced the way it did? Undoubtedly. But it wasn’t their only slice. And the thousands of England fans counting their blessings at Lord’s on Sunday, the millions further afield, were simply beneficiaries of a much longer chain of luck: not just one of the great cricket games of all time, but good weather and a fine setting in which to watch it. The time and means to devote to it. And to be healthy and sentient and alive at just the right moment to enjoy it; which, it almost goes without saying, is the greatest fortune of all.
Ben Stokes, that deflection and the question of what is luck in sport?
A butterfly flaps its wings in San Francisco, and a traffic policeman feels just the faintest chill on the back of his neck in Tokyo, and a mangrove sighs in the breeze in Madagascar, and a cigarette flicked from the fourth floor of an apartment block narrowly misses the back wheel of a passing cyclist in Amsterdam, and at Lord’s a cricket ball arcs through the air and lands on a cricket bat and ricochets away in the only direction that will send it unimpeded towards the boundary.Was that what happened? Well, it seems as good an explanation as any. Given unlimited time, unlimited resources and unlimited co-operation, I suppose you could concoct a more scientific explanation of the deflection that won England the Cricket World Cup last Sunday: some combination of the tension in Martin Guptill’s shoulder as he hurled the ball in, the friction of the Lord’s turf, the geometry of Ben Stokes’s dive, the speed of the outfield, the anticipation and positioning of the New Zealand fielders - notice how Colin de Grandhomme takes a step to his left at short third man, anticipating the original path of the throw, because why on earth would you anticipate anything else? You could break down that passage of play to the millisecond, model the scenario in a NASA-level of detail, and it would explain everything, and it would also explain nothing. And five days after that deflection, after that over, after that final, after that victory, perhaps this is the safest place to start: by admitting that neither you nor I nor anyone else can really explain what happened, or why.You can play around with the counterfactuals, of course. Perhaps England still win even without that deflection. Perhaps if England need six rather than two off the last ball, Stokes smashes that full toss from Trent Boult into the stands rather than bunting it safely down the ground. Then again, if the umpires apply the rules correctly, notice the batsmen hadn’t crossed at the time of Guptill’s throw and deduct a run from England’s total, Adil Rashid is on strike, and maybe Stokes doesn’t face another ball. You could drive yourself to insanity thinking about all the permutations and possibilities. So for the most part, we don’t. We tell ourselves New Zealand were robbed, that the ICC are corrupt fools, that the rules on overthrows are stupid and should be changed. Or we tell ourselves that England were clearly the best team over the tournament as a whole, over the last four years of one-day international cricket, that luck is a part of sport, that these things even themselves out, that this was a worthy reward for these fine young men, that Eoin Morgan is a cricketing genius and we’re off to the pub. We think, in other words, what we have already decided to think: what in our heart of hearts makes us feel best about ourselves.Five days on, it’s safe to say I haven’t stopped thinking about that deflection. It’s more accurate to say I can’t stop thinking about it. Watching cricket is all about loyalty and learning, about investing your time and emotions in pursuit of discovery. Writing about it is all about analysing and explaining, spotting patterns, identifying stories. So how do we process an event that fits into no rational pattern, that sits so remotely beyond the realm of anything we’ve previously experienced? Maybe it’s just the recency bias talking, but I can’t immediately think of a parallel in the history of competitive sport. Retorting that “luck has always been a part of sport” is no sort of retort at all: not this sort of luck, not this outlandish or outrageous, not this violent, not this random, not this decisive. You can win a Wimbledon final on a lucky net cord, but not unless you’re already match point up, and in any case we’ve all seen plenty of lucky net cords in our time. In football, a shot can deflect off three players and trickle miraculously into the net, but it’s still a shot, which implies an attack, which implies that the ball is already in the vicinity of the goal. Here, the only two (seemingly) realistic possibilities were that Stokes was out (one run) or Stokes was not out (two runs). Neither scenario was disadvantageous to New Zealand. Neither would have shaken their status as heavy favourites. Instead, in one freakish twist, they became underdogs. The real parallel would be Diego Maradona’s Hand of God goal against England in 1986: but instead of the goal simply being disallowed, a goal somehow being awarded to England instead. That’s the sort of reversal of fortune we’re talking here: unfathomable, completely out of nowhere and (very likely) the precise difference between victory and defeat.An NFL-loving friend offered up the Immaculate Reception of 1972, in which the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Oakland Raiders with seconds remaining, after a long pass bounced off the helmet of a defender and straight into the arms of a Steelers play for a game-winning touchdown. That certainly ticks the boxes for randomness and improbability, but not impact: for all the legacy of that play in Steelers mythology, it’s often forgotten that they lost their next game, and didn’t even make that year’s Super Bowl.So, yeah: open to suggestions. All I can really say, from my still-hazy memories of jumping up and down in the Lord’s press box, is that it’s by some distance the most remarkable thing I’ve ever seen in a decade of covering sport, and with the possible exception of the 2005 Edgbaston Test (“Jones… Bowden!”) the most preternaturally blessed I’ve ever felt in 26 years of following sport as a fan. I’m not, by the remotest stretch of anyone’s imagination, a religious man. But as the ball bobbled over the Lord’s boundary that evening, I think I understood, for the very first time, why some people are. \---I wrote earlier in the tournament, after England had beaten New Zealand at Durham to qualify for the semi-finals, that England had been extremely lucky. On one level, this was incontrovertibly true. Jason Roy should have been out early on against India, only for Virat Kohli to decline a review. Against New Zealand, Kane Williamson was freakishly run out at the non-striker’s end. In two must-win games, Morgan had won two crucial tosses against opponents who, by dint of the fixture list, had already all but qualified. None of this was to diminish England’s skill or Morgan’s gifts in the slightest: as Richie Benaud put it, captaincy is 90 per cent luck and 10 per cent skill, but don’t try it without that 10 per cent. Even so, the piece was almost unanimously panned online. “Belittling our achievements,” wrote one respondent. “Not a fair reflection of the efforts of Bairstow and Stokes,” wrote another. “More negativity unnecessarily,” wrote a third, and this was the general gist of the complaints: that in spotlighting England’s luck I was in some way selling them short, that to imply good fortune is another way of saying they don’t deserve, that they don’t belong. Why might this be the case, I wonder? Professional athletes often abhor the idea of luck. One of the mantras of elite sport is control: control your preparation, control your surroundings, control your body and your mentality. “We’re just focused on ourselves, on doing what we have to do,” you’ll often hear athletes saying in advance of a big game, and while you see where they’re coming from you also sort of want to interrogate them a little: you do realise there’s going to be an opposition out there on Saturday, don’t you?It is, in many ways, the mantra of our culture: a fallacious belief, in the absence of any conclusive evidence, that we can be the sole agents of our own success, simply by wishing it so. Believe harder. You get out what you put in. Success comes to those who work for it. Winning teams and winning athletes generally convince themselves that their triumphs are the result of their own toil alone: that they wanted it more, that they uniquely mastered the situations they were dealt, that in some important way their successes reflect their own inimitably virtuous character. Perhaps it’s a side point, but the vast majority of the hundreds of people who took issue with my piece - in fact, I would say, all but a couple of those whose demographic was discernible - were white men. Throughout virtually the entire history of this country, to have been born a white man in Britain is to have been born lucky. White men earn, on average, significantly more than both black men and white women. They’re less likely to get stopped and searched, groped and cat-called in the street. They’re less likely to be denied a job interview because of the way they look. They’ve over-represented in the law, the places that make the laws and the places that enforce the laws. British society has, by and large, been created with the white man in mind. Perhaps it’s no surprise that if you’ve been born into that sort of privilege, the very notion of luck is not just a sporting question but an existential threat, to be refuted and repudiated at all costs.\---This is the thing about luck: you can’t just let it in just a little. You can’t acknowledge this bit without acknowledging bit too. You can’t weigh up moment x without factoring in all the myriad y’s and z’s that first went into it. “The intervention of luck is like a boulder that diverts the course of a stream,” writes Ed Smith, the former cricketer and journalist who lost his own England career thanks to a duff LBW decision, but on Sunday was at Lord’s to watch the team he selected win the World Cup for the first time. “The course is changed - and stays changed forever, whatever happens downstream.”Were New Zealand unlucky to lose the World Cup final? Undoubtedly. Does that mean they deserved to win it? In many ways, it’s a moot question. Perhaps they were fortunate to be in the position to win it in the first place: fortunate to scrape into the semi-finals on net run rate, fortunate with form and injuries, fortunate to have been born both with the talent to get to a World Cup and in a country participating in it. Were England fortunate that Guptill’s throw bounced the way it did? Undoubtedly. But it wasn’t their only slice. And the thousands of England fans counting their blessings at Lord’s on Sunday, the millions further afield, were simply beneficiaries of a much longer chain of luck: not just one of the great cricket games of all time, but good weather and a fine setting in which to watch it. The time and means to devote to it. And to be healthy and sentient and alive at just the right moment to enjoy it; which, it almost goes without saying, is the greatest fortune of all.
A butterfly flaps its wings in San Francisco, and a traffic policeman feels just the faintest chill on the back of his neck in Tokyo, and a mangrove sighs in the breeze in Madagascar, and a cigarette flicked from the fourth floor of an apartment block narrowly misses the back wheel of a passing cyclist in Amsterdam, and at Lord’s a cricket ball arcs through the air and lands on a cricket bat and ricochets away in the only direction that will send it unimpeded towards the boundary.Was that what happened? Well, it seems as good an explanation as any. Given unlimited time, unlimited resources and unlimited co-operation, I suppose you could concoct a more scientific explanation of the deflection that won England the Cricket World Cup last Sunday: some combination of the tension in Martin Guptill’s shoulder as he hurled the ball in, the friction of the Lord’s turf, the geometry of Ben Stokes’s dive, the speed of the outfield, the anticipation and positioning of the New Zealand fielders - notice how Colin de Grandhomme takes a step to his left at short third man, anticipating the original path of the throw, because why on earth would you anticipate anything else? You could break down that passage of play to the millisecond, model the scenario in a NASA-level of detail, and it would explain everything, and it would also explain nothing. And five days after that deflection, after that over, after that final, after that victory, perhaps this is the safest place to start: by admitting that neither you nor I nor anyone else can really explain what happened, or why.You can play around with the counterfactuals, of course. Perhaps England still win even without that deflection. Perhaps if England need six rather than two off the last ball, Stokes smashes that full toss from Trent Boult into the stands rather than bunting it safely down the ground. Then again, if the umpires apply the rules correctly, notice the batsmen hadn’t crossed at the time of Guptill’s throw and deduct a run from England’s total, Adil Rashid is on strike, and maybe Stokes doesn’t face another ball. You could drive yourself to insanity thinking about all the permutations and possibilities. So for the most part, we don’t. We tell ourselves New Zealand were robbed, that the ICC are corrupt fools, that the rules on overthrows are stupid and should be changed. Or we tell ourselves that England were clearly the best team over the tournament as a whole, over the last four years of one-day international cricket, that luck is a part of sport, that these things even themselves out, that this was a worthy reward for these fine young men, that Eoin Morgan is a cricketing genius and we’re off to the pub. We think, in other words, what we have already decided to think: what in our heart of hearts makes us feel best about ourselves.Five days on, it’s safe to say I haven’t stopped thinking about that deflection. It’s more accurate to say I can’t stop thinking about it. Watching cricket is all about loyalty and learning, about investing your time and emotions in pursuit of discovery. Writing about it is all about analysing and explaining, spotting patterns, identifying stories. So how do we process an event that fits into no rational pattern, that sits so remotely beyond the realm of anything we’ve previously experienced? Maybe it’s just the recency bias talking, but I can’t immediately think of a parallel in the history of competitive sport. Retorting that “luck has always been a part of sport” is no sort of retort at all: not this sort of luck, not this outlandish or outrageous, not this violent, not this random, not this decisive. You can win a Wimbledon final on a lucky net cord, but not unless you’re already match point up, and in any case we’ve all seen plenty of lucky net cords in our time. In football, a shot can deflect off three players and trickle miraculously into the net, but it’s still a shot, which implies an attack, which implies that the ball is already in the vicinity of the goal. Here, the only two (seemingly) realistic possibilities were that Stokes was out (one run) or Stokes was not out (two runs). Neither scenario was disadvantageous to New Zealand. Neither would have shaken their status as heavy favourites. Instead, in one freakish twist, they became underdogs. The real parallel would be Diego Maradona’s Hand of God goal against England in 1986: but instead of the goal simply being disallowed, a goal somehow being awarded to England instead. That’s the sort of reversal of fortune we’re talking here: unfathomable, completely out of nowhere and (very likely) the precise difference between victory and defeat.An NFL-loving friend offered up the Immaculate Reception of 1972, in which the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Oakland Raiders with seconds remaining, after a long pass bounced off the helmet of a defender and straight into the arms of a Steelers play for a game-winning touchdown. That certainly ticks the boxes for randomness and improbability, but not impact: for all the legacy of that play in Steelers mythology, it’s often forgotten that they lost their next game, and didn’t even make that year’s Super Bowl.So, yeah: open to suggestions. All I can really say, from my still-hazy memories of jumping up and down in the Lord’s press box, is that it’s by some distance the most remarkable thing I’ve ever seen in a decade of covering sport, and with the possible exception of the 2005 Edgbaston Test (“Jones… Bowden!”) the most preternaturally blessed I’ve ever felt in 26 years of following sport as a fan. I’m not, by the remotest stretch of anyone’s imagination, a religious man. But as the ball bobbled over the Lord’s boundary that evening, I think I understood, for the very first time, why some people are. \---I wrote earlier in the tournament, after England had beaten New Zealand at Durham to qualify for the semi-finals, that England had been extremely lucky. On one level, this was incontrovertibly true. Jason Roy should have been out early on against India, only for Virat Kohli to decline a review. Against New Zealand, Kane Williamson was freakishly run out at the non-striker’s end. In two must-win games, Morgan had won two crucial tosses against opponents who, by dint of the fixture list, had already all but qualified. None of this was to diminish England’s skill or Morgan’s gifts in the slightest: as Richie Benaud put it, captaincy is 90 per cent luck and 10 per cent skill, but don’t try it without that 10 per cent. Even so, the piece was almost unanimously panned online. “Belittling our achievements,” wrote one respondent. “Not a fair reflection of the efforts of Bairstow and Stokes,” wrote another. “More negativity unnecessarily,” wrote a third, and this was the general gist of the complaints: that in spotlighting England’s luck I was in some way selling them short, that to imply good fortune is another way of saying they don’t deserve, that they don’t belong. Why might this be the case, I wonder? Professional athletes often abhor the idea of luck. One of the mantras of elite sport is control: control your preparation, control your surroundings, control your body and your mentality. “We’re just focused on ourselves, on doing what we have to do,” you’ll often hear athletes saying in advance of a big game, and while you see where they’re coming from you also sort of want to interrogate them a little: you do realise there’s going to be an opposition out there on Saturday, don’t you?It is, in many ways, the mantra of our culture: a fallacious belief, in the absence of any conclusive evidence, that we can be the sole agents of our own success, simply by wishing it so. Believe harder. You get out what you put in. Success comes to those who work for it. Winning teams and winning athletes generally convince themselves that their triumphs are the result of their own toil alone: that they wanted it more, that they uniquely mastered the situations they were dealt, that in some important way their successes reflect their own inimitably virtuous character. Perhaps it’s a side point, but the vast majority of the hundreds of people who took issue with my piece - in fact, I would say, all but a couple of those whose demographic was discernible - were white men. Throughout virtually the entire history of this country, to have been born a white man in Britain is to have been born lucky. White men earn, on average, significantly more than both black men and white women. They’re less likely to get stopped and searched, groped and cat-called in the street. They’re less likely to be denied a job interview because of the way they look. They’ve over-represented in the law, the places that make the laws and the places that enforce the laws. British society has, by and large, been created with the white man in mind. Perhaps it’s no surprise that if you’ve been born into that sort of privilege, the very notion of luck is not just a sporting question but an existential threat, to be refuted and repudiated at all costs.\---This is the thing about luck: you can’t just let it in just a little. You can’t acknowledge this bit without acknowledging bit too. You can’t weigh up moment x without factoring in all the myriad y’s and z’s that first went into it. “The intervention of luck is like a boulder that diverts the course of a stream,” writes Ed Smith, the former cricketer and journalist who lost his own England career thanks to a duff LBW decision, but on Sunday was at Lord’s to watch the team he selected win the World Cup for the first time. “The course is changed - and stays changed forever, whatever happens downstream.”Were New Zealand unlucky to lose the World Cup final? Undoubtedly. Does that mean they deserved to win it? In many ways, it’s a moot question. Perhaps they were fortunate to be in the position to win it in the first place: fortunate to scrape into the semi-finals on net run rate, fortunate with form and injuries, fortunate to have been born both with the talent to get to a World Cup and in a country participating in it. Were England fortunate that Guptill’s throw bounced the way it did? Undoubtedly. But it wasn’t their only slice. And the thousands of England fans counting their blessings at Lord’s on Sunday, the millions further afield, were simply beneficiaries of a much longer chain of luck: not just one of the great cricket games of all time, but good weather and a fine setting in which to watch it. The time and means to devote to it. And to be healthy and sentient and alive at just the right moment to enjoy it; which, it almost goes without saying, is the greatest fortune of all.
Ben Stokes, that deflection and the question of what is luck in sport?
A butterfly flaps its wings in San Francisco, and a traffic policeman feels just the faintest chill on the back of his neck in Tokyo, and a mangrove sighs in the breeze in Madagascar, and a cigarette flicked from the fourth floor of an apartment block narrowly misses the back wheel of a passing cyclist in Amsterdam, and at Lord’s a cricket ball arcs through the air and lands on a cricket bat and ricochets away in the only direction that will send it unimpeded towards the boundary.Was that what happened? Well, it seems as good an explanation as any. Given unlimited time, unlimited resources and unlimited co-operation, I suppose you could concoct a more scientific explanation of the deflection that won England the Cricket World Cup last Sunday: some combination of the tension in Martin Guptill’s shoulder as he hurled the ball in, the friction of the Lord’s turf, the geometry of Ben Stokes’s dive, the speed of the outfield, the anticipation and positioning of the New Zealand fielders - notice how Colin de Grandhomme takes a step to his left at short third man, anticipating the original path of the throw, because why on earth would you anticipate anything else? You could break down that passage of play to the millisecond, model the scenario in a NASA-level of detail, and it would explain everything, and it would also explain nothing. And five days after that deflection, after that over, after that final, after that victory, perhaps this is the safest place to start: by admitting that neither you nor I nor anyone else can really explain what happened, or why.You can play around with the counterfactuals, of course. Perhaps England still win even without that deflection. Perhaps if England need six rather than two off the last ball, Stokes smashes that full toss from Trent Boult into the stands rather than bunting it safely down the ground. Then again, if the umpires apply the rules correctly, notice the batsmen hadn’t crossed at the time of Guptill’s throw and deduct a run from England’s total, Adil Rashid is on strike, and maybe Stokes doesn’t face another ball. You could drive yourself to insanity thinking about all the permutations and possibilities. So for the most part, we don’t. We tell ourselves New Zealand were robbed, that the ICC are corrupt fools, that the rules on overthrows are stupid and should be changed. Or we tell ourselves that England were clearly the best team over the tournament as a whole, over the last four years of one-day international cricket, that luck is a part of sport, that these things even themselves out, that this was a worthy reward for these fine young men, that Eoin Morgan is a cricketing genius and we’re off to the pub. We think, in other words, what we have already decided to think: what in our heart of hearts makes us feel best about ourselves.Five days on, it’s safe to say I haven’t stopped thinking about that deflection. It’s more accurate to say I can’t stop thinking about it. Watching cricket is all about loyalty and learning, about investing your time and emotions in pursuit of discovery. Writing about it is all about analysing and explaining, spotting patterns, identifying stories. So how do we process an event that fits into no rational pattern, that sits so remotely beyond the realm of anything we’ve previously experienced? Maybe it’s just the recency bias talking, but I can’t immediately think of a parallel in the history of competitive sport. Retorting that “luck has always been a part of sport” is no sort of retort at all: not this sort of luck, not this outlandish or outrageous, not this violent, not this random, not this decisive. You can win a Wimbledon final on a lucky net cord, but not unless you’re already match point up, and in any case we’ve all seen plenty of lucky net cords in our time. In football, a shot can deflect off three players and trickle miraculously into the net, but it’s still a shot, which implies an attack, which implies that the ball is already in the vicinity of the goal. Here, the only two (seemingly) realistic possibilities were that Stokes was out (one run) or Stokes was not out (two runs). Neither scenario was disadvantageous to New Zealand. Neither would have shaken their status as heavy favourites. Instead, in one freakish twist, they became underdogs. The real parallel would be Diego Maradona’s Hand of God goal against England in 1986: but instead of the goal simply being disallowed, a goal somehow being awarded to England instead. That’s the sort of reversal of fortune we’re talking here: unfathomable, completely out of nowhere and (very likely) the precise difference between victory and defeat.An NFL-loving friend offered up the Immaculate Reception of 1972, in which the Pittsburgh Steelers beat the Oakland Raiders with seconds remaining, after a long pass bounced off the helmet of a defender and straight into the arms of a Steelers play for a game-winning touchdown. That certainly ticks the boxes for randomness and improbability, but not impact: for all the legacy of that play in Steelers mythology, it’s often forgotten that they lost their next game, and didn’t even make that year’s Super Bowl.So, yeah: open to suggestions. All I can really say, from my still-hazy memories of jumping up and down in the Lord’s press box, is that it’s by some distance the most remarkable thing I’ve ever seen in a decade of covering sport, and with the possible exception of the 2005 Edgbaston Test (“Jones… Bowden!”) the most preternaturally blessed I’ve ever felt in 26 years of following sport as a fan. I’m not, by the remotest stretch of anyone’s imagination, a religious man. But as the ball bobbled over the Lord’s boundary that evening, I think I understood, for the very first time, why some people are. \---I wrote earlier in the tournament, after England had beaten New Zealand at Durham to qualify for the semi-finals, that England had been extremely lucky. On one level, this was incontrovertibly true. Jason Roy should have been out early on against India, only for Virat Kohli to decline a review. Against New Zealand, Kane Williamson was freakishly run out at the non-striker’s end. In two must-win games, Morgan had won two crucial tosses against opponents who, by dint of the fixture list, had already all but qualified. None of this was to diminish England’s skill or Morgan’s gifts in the slightest: as Richie Benaud put it, captaincy is 90 per cent luck and 10 per cent skill, but don’t try it without that 10 per cent. Even so, the piece was almost unanimously panned online. “Belittling our achievements,” wrote one respondent. “Not a fair reflection of the efforts of Bairstow and Stokes,” wrote another. “More negativity unnecessarily,” wrote a third, and this was the general gist of the complaints: that in spotlighting England’s luck I was in some way selling them short, that to imply good fortune is another way of saying they don’t deserve, that they don’t belong. Why might this be the case, I wonder? Professional athletes often abhor the idea of luck. One of the mantras of elite sport is control: control your preparation, control your surroundings, control your body and your mentality. “We’re just focused on ourselves, on doing what we have to do,” you’ll often hear athletes saying in advance of a big game, and while you see where they’re coming from you also sort of want to interrogate them a little: you do realise there’s going to be an opposition out there on Saturday, don’t you?It is, in many ways, the mantra of our culture: a fallacious belief, in the absence of any conclusive evidence, that we can be the sole agents of our own success, simply by wishing it so. Believe harder. You get out what you put in. Success comes to those who work for it. Winning teams and winning athletes generally convince themselves that their triumphs are the result of their own toil alone: that they wanted it more, that they uniquely mastered the situations they were dealt, that in some important way their successes reflect their own inimitably virtuous character. Perhaps it’s a side point, but the vast majority of the hundreds of people who took issue with my piece - in fact, I would say, all but a couple of those whose demographic was discernible - were white men. Throughout virtually the entire history of this country, to have been born a white man in Britain is to have been born lucky. White men earn, on average, significantly more than both black men and white women. They’re less likely to get stopped and searched, groped and cat-called in the street. They’re less likely to be denied a job interview because of the way they look. They’ve over-represented in the law, the places that make the laws and the places that enforce the laws. British society has, by and large, been created with the white man in mind. Perhaps it’s no surprise that if you’ve been born into that sort of privilege, the very notion of luck is not just a sporting question but an existential threat, to be refuted and repudiated at all costs.\---This is the thing about luck: you can’t just let it in just a little. You can’t acknowledge this bit without acknowledging bit too. You can’t weigh up moment x without factoring in all the myriad y’s and z’s that first went into it. “The intervention of luck is like a boulder that diverts the course of a stream,” writes Ed Smith, the former cricketer and journalist who lost his own England career thanks to a duff LBW decision, but on Sunday was at Lord’s to watch the team he selected win the World Cup for the first time. “The course is changed - and stays changed forever, whatever happens downstream.”Were New Zealand unlucky to lose the World Cup final? Undoubtedly. Does that mean they deserved to win it? In many ways, it’s a moot question. Perhaps they were fortunate to be in the position to win it in the first place: fortunate to scrape into the semi-finals on net run rate, fortunate with form and injuries, fortunate to have been born both with the talent to get to a World Cup and in a country participating in it. Were England fortunate that Guptill’s throw bounced the way it did? Undoubtedly. But it wasn’t their only slice. And the thousands of England fans counting their blessings at Lord’s on Sunday, the millions further afield, were simply beneficiaries of a much longer chain of luck: not just one of the great cricket games of all time, but good weather and a fine setting in which to watch it. The time and means to devote to it. And to be healthy and sentient and alive at just the right moment to enjoy it; which, it almost goes without saying, is the greatest fortune of all.
Athletes including Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James have been featured in the fourth annual Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list.The list pays tribute to the most stylish athletes in sport, including stars at the top of their games in tennis, basketball, football, golf and more.This year's Fashionable 50 Sports Illustrated magazine cover has been graced by Williams, who just missed out on clinching her 24th Grand Slam title following her Wimbledon women's singles final loss to Simona Halep on Saturday.Williams has made a name for herself both on the court and the catwalk, having announced the launch of her first solo clothing line in May last year.The 37-year-old also frequently collaborates with high-profile fashion labels, having worn a custom-made Nike outfit designed by Virgil Abloh for this year's French Open.> View this post on Instagram> > @sportsillustrated Fashionable Fifty Issue. Photographed by @jefferysalter Styling by @jasonbolden Makeup by @paulinebriscoe Hair by @lorraine_dublin> > A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on Jul 19, 2019 at 6:00am PDTAlso on the list is celebrated professional basketball player LeBron James.While James' fans will be most used to seeing the athlete in his Los Angeles Lakers jersey, the athlete also knows how to work a cool, casual, off-court look."Dressing his 6'8", 250-pound frame is no small task, but King James has mastered game-day dressing with expert tailoring, cool accessorising and a polished mixing-and-matching of fabrics patterns and colours," Sports Illustrated states with regards to the 34-year-old.> View this post on Instagram> > To Mars and Beyond!! 🚀> > A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Mar 22, 2019 at 6:36pm PDTFive-time Grand Slam winner Maria Sharapova also made the list, due to the "elegant aesthetic" she regularly displays.On 24 February, the tennis player attended the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party in Beverly Hills, California.> View this post on Instagram> > Vanity Fair 2019 in @lanvinofficial oscars2019> > A post shared by Maria Sharapova (@mariasharapova) on Feb 25, 2019 at 7:35am PSTThe 32-year-old wore a metallic pleated mini dress by French fashion house Lanvin, accessorising with silver, dangly earrings and black, strappy heels.Sharapova had her hair styled in an updo, placing further emphasis on the intricate design of the dress.Other stars featured on the Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list include Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo, FIFA Women's World Cup winner Ashlyn Harris and alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn. For the full list of Sports Illustrated's Fashionable 50, click here.
Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James make Sports Illustrated’s top 50 fashionable athletes
Athletes including Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James have been featured in the fourth annual Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list.The list pays tribute to the most stylish athletes in sport, including stars at the top of their games in tennis, basketball, football, golf and more.This year's Fashionable 50 Sports Illustrated magazine cover has been graced by Williams, who just missed out on clinching her 24th Grand Slam title following her Wimbledon women's singles final loss to Simona Halep on Saturday.Williams has made a name for herself both on the court and the catwalk, having announced the launch of her first solo clothing line in May last year.The 37-year-old also frequently collaborates with high-profile fashion labels, having worn a custom-made Nike outfit designed by Virgil Abloh for this year's French Open.> View this post on Instagram> > @sportsillustrated Fashionable Fifty Issue. Photographed by @jefferysalter Styling by @jasonbolden Makeup by @paulinebriscoe Hair by @lorraine_dublin> > A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on Jul 19, 2019 at 6:00am PDTAlso on the list is celebrated professional basketball player LeBron James.While James' fans will be most used to seeing the athlete in his Los Angeles Lakers jersey, the athlete also knows how to work a cool, casual, off-court look."Dressing his 6'8", 250-pound frame is no small task, but King James has mastered game-day dressing with expert tailoring, cool accessorising and a polished mixing-and-matching of fabrics patterns and colours," Sports Illustrated states with regards to the 34-year-old.> View this post on Instagram> > To Mars and Beyond!! 🚀> > A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Mar 22, 2019 at 6:36pm PDTFive-time Grand Slam winner Maria Sharapova also made the list, due to the "elegant aesthetic" she regularly displays.On 24 February, the tennis player attended the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party in Beverly Hills, California.> View this post on Instagram> > Vanity Fair 2019 in @lanvinofficial oscars2019> > A post shared by Maria Sharapova (@mariasharapova) on Feb 25, 2019 at 7:35am PSTThe 32-year-old wore a metallic pleated mini dress by French fashion house Lanvin, accessorising with silver, dangly earrings and black, strappy heels.Sharapova had her hair styled in an updo, placing further emphasis on the intricate design of the dress.Other stars featured on the Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list include Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo, FIFA Women's World Cup winner Ashlyn Harris and alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn. For the full list of Sports Illustrated's Fashionable 50, click here.
Athletes including Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James have been featured in the fourth annual Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list.The list pays tribute to the most stylish athletes in sport, including stars at the top of their games in tennis, basketball, football, golf and more.This year's Fashionable 50 Sports Illustrated magazine cover has been graced by Williams, who just missed out on clinching her 24th Grand Slam title following her Wimbledon women's singles final loss to Simona Halep on Saturday.Williams has made a name for herself both on the court and the catwalk, having announced the launch of her first solo clothing line in May last year.The 37-year-old also frequently collaborates with high-profile fashion labels, having worn a custom-made Nike outfit designed by Virgil Abloh for this year's French Open.> View this post on Instagram> > @sportsillustrated Fashionable Fifty Issue. Photographed by @jefferysalter Styling by @jasonbolden Makeup by @paulinebriscoe Hair by @lorraine_dublin> > A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on Jul 19, 2019 at 6:00am PDTAlso on the list is celebrated professional basketball player LeBron James.While James' fans will be most used to seeing the athlete in his Los Angeles Lakers jersey, the athlete also knows how to work a cool, casual, off-court look."Dressing his 6'8", 250-pound frame is no small task, but King James has mastered game-day dressing with expert tailoring, cool accessorising and a polished mixing-and-matching of fabrics patterns and colours," Sports Illustrated states with regards to the 34-year-old.> View this post on Instagram> > To Mars and Beyond!! 🚀> > A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Mar 22, 2019 at 6:36pm PDTFive-time Grand Slam winner Maria Sharapova also made the list, due to the "elegant aesthetic" she regularly displays.On 24 February, the tennis player attended the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party in Beverly Hills, California.> View this post on Instagram> > Vanity Fair 2019 in @lanvinofficial oscars2019> > A post shared by Maria Sharapova (@mariasharapova) on Feb 25, 2019 at 7:35am PSTThe 32-year-old wore a metallic pleated mini dress by French fashion house Lanvin, accessorising with silver, dangly earrings and black, strappy heels.Sharapova had her hair styled in an updo, placing further emphasis on the intricate design of the dress.Other stars featured on the Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list include Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo, FIFA Women's World Cup winner Ashlyn Harris and alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn. For the full list of Sports Illustrated's Fashionable 50, click here.
Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James make Sports Illustrated’s top 50 fashionable athletes
Athletes including Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and LeBron James have been featured in the fourth annual Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list.The list pays tribute to the most stylish athletes in sport, including stars at the top of their games in tennis, basketball, football, golf and more.This year's Fashionable 50 Sports Illustrated magazine cover has been graced by Williams, who just missed out on clinching her 24th Grand Slam title following her Wimbledon women's singles final loss to Simona Halep on Saturday.Williams has made a name for herself both on the court and the catwalk, having announced the launch of her first solo clothing line in May last year.The 37-year-old also frequently collaborates with high-profile fashion labels, having worn a custom-made Nike outfit designed by Virgil Abloh for this year's French Open.> View this post on Instagram> > @sportsillustrated Fashionable Fifty Issue. Photographed by @jefferysalter Styling by @jasonbolden Makeup by @paulinebriscoe Hair by @lorraine_dublin> > A post shared by Serena Williams (@serenawilliams) on Jul 19, 2019 at 6:00am PDTAlso on the list is celebrated professional basketball player LeBron James.While James' fans will be most used to seeing the athlete in his Los Angeles Lakers jersey, the athlete also knows how to work a cool, casual, off-court look."Dressing his 6'8", 250-pound frame is no small task, but King James has mastered game-day dressing with expert tailoring, cool accessorising and a polished mixing-and-matching of fabrics patterns and colours," Sports Illustrated states with regards to the 34-year-old.> View this post on Instagram> > To Mars and Beyond!! 🚀> > A post shared by LeBron James (@kingjames) on Mar 22, 2019 at 6:36pm PDTFive-time Grand Slam winner Maria Sharapova also made the list, due to the "elegant aesthetic" she regularly displays.On 24 February, the tennis player attended the Vanity Fair Oscars after-party in Beverly Hills, California.> View this post on Instagram> > Vanity Fair 2019 in @lanvinofficial oscars2019> > A post shared by Maria Sharapova (@mariasharapova) on Feb 25, 2019 at 7:35am PSTThe 32-year-old wore a metallic pleated mini dress by French fashion house Lanvin, accessorising with silver, dangly earrings and black, strappy heels.Sharapova had her hair styled in an updo, placing further emphasis on the intricate design of the dress.Other stars featured on the Sports Illustrated Fashionable 50 list include Formula One driver Lewis Hamilton, footballer Cristiano Ronaldo, FIFA Women's World Cup winner Ashlyn Harris and alpine ski racer Lindsey Vonn. For the full list of Sports Illustrated's Fashionable 50, click here.
La rumana Simona Halep alza el trofeo de campeona después de derrotar en la final de Wimbledon a Serena Williams, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019, en Londres. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
US OPEN-BOLSA
La rumana Simona Halep alza el trofeo de campeona después de derrotar en la final de Wimbledon a Serena Williams, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019, en Londres. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
It seems that the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex have a lotmore in common nowadays
Kate Middleton reportedly comforted Meghan Markle after Serena Williams' Wimbledon loss
It seems that the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex have a lotmore in common nowadays
It seems that the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex have a lotmore in common nowadays
Kate Middleton reportedly comforted Meghan Markle after Serena Williams' Wimbledon loss
It seems that the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Sussex have a lotmore in common nowadays
Vast swarms of flying ants which descended across the south coast of England this week, were so dense they could be seen by satellites in space.The insects which invaded Hampshire, West Sussex and Dorset, came in such numbers they were mistaken by the Met Office’s radar imaging for rain clouds.The swarm came on Wednesday during the ants’ seasonal nuptial flight – a phase of reproduction that sees virgin queens pursued by millions of males hoping to mate.Because she flies away from all but the strongest and fastest potential partners, the process helps to refine the survival of the fittest process.But it also means that a lot of ants take to the skies and then to the ground for several hours.The insects showed up on images as showers of rain because "the radar thinks the beams are hitting raindrops, not ants", a Met Office spokesperson said. The nuptial flight has become colloquially known as "Flying Ant Day", although it can occur across several weeks during hot summers.The insects are generally harmless to humans but can cause some chaos.In recent years, players at Wimbledon have struggled to maintain focus as swarms descended during the annual tennis championship.
Swarms of flying ants so dense they can be seen from space
Vast swarms of flying ants which descended across the south coast of England this week, were so dense they could be seen by satellites in space.The insects which invaded Hampshire, West Sussex and Dorset, came in such numbers they were mistaken by the Met Office’s radar imaging for rain clouds.The swarm came on Wednesday during the ants’ seasonal nuptial flight – a phase of reproduction that sees virgin queens pursued by millions of males hoping to mate.Because she flies away from all but the strongest and fastest potential partners, the process helps to refine the survival of the fittest process.But it also means that a lot of ants take to the skies and then to the ground for several hours.The insects showed up on images as showers of rain because "the radar thinks the beams are hitting raindrops, not ants", a Met Office spokesperson said. The nuptial flight has become colloquially known as "Flying Ant Day", although it can occur across several weeks during hot summers.The insects are generally harmless to humans but can cause some chaos.In recent years, players at Wimbledon have struggled to maintain focus as swarms descended during the annual tennis championship.
Vast swarms of flying ants which descended across the south coast of England this week, were so dense they could be seen by satellites in space.The insects which invaded Hampshire, West Sussex and Dorset, came in such numbers they were mistaken by the Met Office’s radar imaging for rain clouds.The swarm came on Wednesday during the ants’ seasonal nuptial flight – a phase of reproduction that sees virgin queens pursued by millions of males hoping to mate.Because she flies away from all but the strongest and fastest potential partners, the process helps to refine the survival of the fittest process.But it also means that a lot of ants take to the skies and then to the ground for several hours.The insects showed up on images as showers of rain because "the radar thinks the beams are hitting raindrops, not ants", a Met Office spokesperson said. The nuptial flight has become colloquially known as "Flying Ant Day", although it can occur across several weeks during hot summers.The insects are generally harmless to humans but can cause some chaos.In recent years, players at Wimbledon have struggled to maintain focus as swarms descended during the annual tennis championship.
Swarms of flying ants so dense they can be seen from space
Vast swarms of flying ants which descended across the south coast of England this week, were so dense they could be seen by satellites in space.The insects which invaded Hampshire, West Sussex and Dorset, came in such numbers they were mistaken by the Met Office’s radar imaging for rain clouds.The swarm came on Wednesday during the ants’ seasonal nuptial flight – a phase of reproduction that sees virgin queens pursued by millions of males hoping to mate.Because she flies away from all but the strongest and fastest potential partners, the process helps to refine the survival of the fittest process.But it also means that a lot of ants take to the skies and then to the ground for several hours.The insects showed up on images as showers of rain because "the radar thinks the beams are hitting raindrops, not ants", a Met Office spokesperson said. The nuptial flight has become colloquially known as "Flying Ant Day", although it can occur across several weeks during hot summers.The insects are generally harmless to humans but can cause some chaos.In recent years, players at Wimbledon have struggled to maintain focus as swarms descended during the annual tennis championship.
Woody Harrelson attends the Men's Singles Final at the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London on Sunday.
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Woody Harrelson attends the Men's Singles Final at the Wimbledon tennis tournament in London on Sunday.
Charlize Theron is on the edge of her seat during the men's final of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Sunday in London.
Game Face
Charlize Theron is on the edge of her seat during the men's final of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Sunday in London.
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty / TwitterEver since Bette Davis and Joan Crawford sparred on the set of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, celebrity feuds have been a consistent source of tabloid fodder. When Joan Rivers accepted a late-night hosting position on a competing network, Johnny Carson never forgave her. Fans watched enraptured as Jordyn Woods’ betrayal of Khloé Kardashian played out on the most recent season of Keeping Up With the Kardashians. And just last month, Taylor Swift and Katy Perry finally buried the hatchet over homemade cookies.Luckily, for the celebrity gossip-obsessed, there is a new pop star rivalry to follow. It all began at the end of June when Iggy Azalea announced that her new album, In My Defense, would drop July 19 after a five-year musical dry spell. (The rapper has not released an album since her 2014 debut, The New Classic.)Azalea, however, is facing an unexpected obstacle to her comeback. Peppa Pig, the beloved children’s cartoon character, is dropping an album of her own on the same day. The project is aptly titled My First Album. Peppa has released one single, a bona fide banger called “Bing Bong Zoo,” but the teaser video posted on Twitter previews some of the other 15 songs. I, for one, immediately started bobbing my head to the refrain of British children singing “Peppa, peppa party” over and over again—something that cannot be said for Azalea’s first two singles off of her new album, “Sally Walker” and “Started.” We might just have another “Baby Shark” on our hands: an undeniably catchy, incessantly annoying earworm that will haunt the nightmares of parents around the world. On Tuesday morning, Azalea retweeted the My First Album announcement and jokingly commented, “It’s over for me now.” The official Peppa Pig account clapped back with a GIF of the pig posing in front of a mirror, wearing a crown and a fuchsia frock. The shady caption borrows lyrics from Azalea’s first hit song, “Fancy:” “Peppa’s so fancy, you already know.” For those without young children or a proclivity for meme culture, Peppa Pig is a British cartoon series about the titular pig and her anthropomorphic pals. Peppa talks like any other little girl, save for the occasional snort, and does normal-kid activities like reading, going to school, and hanging out with her family. In a recent Wimbledon special, she plays tennis with her friends. Each episode clocks in at about five minutes. With this latest venture, it appears that she is finally ready to add “pop star” to her résumé. Peppa Pig is no stranger to internet fame. In 2018, she got the meme treatment when a clip from the show went viral. In the one-minute video, Peppa is upset that all of her friends can whistle, but she can’t. She calls up Suzy Sheep to trash-talk their whistling friends, only for Suzy to whistle perfectly on her first try. Wordlessly, Peppa hangs up the landline with a dramatic jab of her pointer finger. People on Twitter used the screengrab of pissed Peppa Pig hanging up the phone to make fun of telemarketers and other unwanted callers. The cartoon even fueled something called the PeppaEffect on Twitter when, earlier this year, American parents began noticing that their kids had adopted British accents or phrases from watching too much Peppa Pig. One Twitter user wrote, “My 5-year-old nephew only goes on holiday, NOT vacation. He’s California born-and-bred.” It sounds like Iggy Azalea might actually have something to worry about. Given the posh farm animal’s influencer status among the preschool set, Peppa Pig’s My First Album might be the sleeper hit of the summer. Azalea is willing to make amends with her unlikely rival under one condition: she agrees to a collaboration. Her latest reply to Peppa Pig’s shade reads, “Collab with me now or you’ll end up a breakfast special peppa.” Honestly, a Piggy Azalea collab might be what it takes for me to finally enjoy a song by the Aussie rapper. The ball’s in your court, Peppa. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
Iggy Azalea Is Back and Has a New Twitter Nemesis: Peppa Pig
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty / TwitterEver since Bette Davis and Joan Crawford sparred on the set of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?, celebrity feuds have been a consistent source of tabloid fodder. When Joan Rivers accepted a late-night hosting position on a competing network, Johnny Carson never forgave her. Fans watched enraptured as Jordyn Woods’ betrayal of Khloé Kardashian played out on the most recent season of Keeping Up With the Kardashians. And just last month, Taylor Swift and Katy Perry finally buried the hatchet over homemade cookies.Luckily, for the celebrity gossip-obsessed, there is a new pop star rivalry to follow. It all began at the end of June when Iggy Azalea announced that her new album, In My Defense, would drop July 19 after a five-year musical dry spell. (The rapper has not released an album since her 2014 debut, The New Classic.)Azalea, however, is facing an unexpected obstacle to her comeback. Peppa Pig, the beloved children’s cartoon character, is dropping an album of her own on the same day. The project is aptly titled My First Album. Peppa has released one single, a bona fide banger called “Bing Bong Zoo,” but the teaser video posted on Twitter previews some of the other 15 songs. I, for one, immediately started bobbing my head to the refrain of British children singing “Peppa, peppa party” over and over again—something that cannot be said for Azalea’s first two singles off of her new album, “Sally Walker” and “Started.” We might just have another “Baby Shark” on our hands: an undeniably catchy, incessantly annoying earworm that will haunt the nightmares of parents around the world. On Tuesday morning, Azalea retweeted the My First Album announcement and jokingly commented, “It’s over for me now.” The official Peppa Pig account clapped back with a GIF of the pig posing in front of a mirror, wearing a crown and a fuchsia frock. The shady caption borrows lyrics from Azalea’s first hit song, “Fancy:” “Peppa’s so fancy, you already know.” For those without young children or a proclivity for meme culture, Peppa Pig is a British cartoon series about the titular pig and her anthropomorphic pals. Peppa talks like any other little girl, save for the occasional snort, and does normal-kid activities like reading, going to school, and hanging out with her family. In a recent Wimbledon special, she plays tennis with her friends. Each episode clocks in at about five minutes. With this latest venture, it appears that she is finally ready to add “pop star” to her résumé. Peppa Pig is no stranger to internet fame. In 2018, she got the meme treatment when a clip from the show went viral. In the one-minute video, Peppa is upset that all of her friends can whistle, but she can’t. She calls up Suzy Sheep to trash-talk their whistling friends, only for Suzy to whistle perfectly on her first try. Wordlessly, Peppa hangs up the landline with a dramatic jab of her pointer finger. People on Twitter used the screengrab of pissed Peppa Pig hanging up the phone to make fun of telemarketers and other unwanted callers. The cartoon even fueled something called the PeppaEffect on Twitter when, earlier this year, American parents began noticing that their kids had adopted British accents or phrases from watching too much Peppa Pig. One Twitter user wrote, “My 5-year-old nephew only goes on holiday, NOT vacation. He’s California born-and-bred.” It sounds like Iggy Azalea might actually have something to worry about. Given the posh farm animal’s influencer status among the preschool set, Peppa Pig’s My First Album might be the sleeper hit of the summer. Azalea is willing to make amends with her unlikely rival under one condition: she agrees to a collaboration. Her latest reply to Peppa Pig’s shade reads, “Collab with me now or you’ll end up a breakfast special peppa.” Honestly, a Piggy Azalea collab might be what it takes for me to finally enjoy a song by the Aussie rapper. The ball’s in your court, Peppa. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
‘Royal Rift’ Rumors Put to Rest: Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle Bonding Over Motherhood
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
‘Royal Rift’ Rumors Put to Rest: Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle Bonding Over Motherhood
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
‘Royal Rift’ Rumors Put to Rest: Kate Middleton and Meghan Markle Bonding Over Motherhood
ET’s royal expert Katie Nicholl says what you saw at Wimbledon was in fact real.
Meghan Markle <a href="https://people.com/royals/meghan-markle-kate-middleton-wimbledon-sisters-in-law-date/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon</a> with Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton wearing a white button-down shirt which she paired with a pleated white and blue skirt from Hugo Boss. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Howriis Women's Summer Chiffon Pleated A-line Midi Skirt Dress, $27.99; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Howriis-Womens-Summer-Chiffon-Pleated/dp/B07PVS1T53/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=pleated+white+midi+skirt&qid=1563386902&s=gateway&sr=8-20-spons&psc=1&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfmeghanmarklesummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=30807c82430730807b5c8a0553586558&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> Chelsea28 Stripe Wrap Skirt, $47.40 (orig. $79); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fchelsea28-stripe-wrap-skirt%2F5135989&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Max Studio Pleated Striped Midi Skirt, $48.30 (orig. $69); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=36025&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lastcall.com%2FMax-Studio-Pleated-Striped-Midi-Skirt-pleated-midi-skirt%2Fprod53940361___%2Fp.prod&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:lastcall.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">lastcall.com</a> BCBGMAXAZRIA Two-Tone Pleated Midi Skirt, $139.30 (orig. $199); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=36025&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lastcall.com%2FBCBGMAXAZRIA-Two-Tone-Pleated-Midi-Skirt-pleated-midi-skirt%2Fprod54200885___%2Fp.prod&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:lastcall.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">lastcall.com</a> REISS Leona Floral Midi Skirt, $145 (orig. $295); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Freiss-leona-floral-midi-skirt%3FID%3D3332036&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> Club Monaco Majida Skirt, $139 (orig. $179.50); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=37811&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.clubmonaco.com%2Fen%2Fwomen-clothing-skirts%2Fmajida-skirt%2F484553.html&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyMeghanMarkle%27sChicSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C6939680%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:clubmonaco.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">clubmonaco.com</a>
Meghan Markle attended at the Ladies’ Singles Final at Wimbledon with Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton wearing a white button-down shirt which she paired with a pleated white and blue skirt from Hugo Boss. Get the Look! Howriis Women's Summer Chiffon Pleated A-line Midi Skirt Dress, $27.99; amazon.com Chelsea28 Stripe Wrap Skirt, $47.40 (orig. $79); nordstrom.com Max Studio Pleated Striped Midi Skirt, $48.30 (orig. $69); lastcall.com BCBGMAXAZRIA Two-Tone Pleated Midi Skirt, $139.30 (orig. $199); lastcall.com REISS Leona Floral Midi Skirt, $145 (orig. $295); bloomingdales.com Club Monaco Majida Skirt, $139 (orig. $179.50); clubmonaco.com
Kate Middleton <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-rewears-green-dress-wimbledon/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon</a> with Pippa Middleton and Meghan Markle wearing a green Dolce & Gabbana midi dress with button detail (a royal re-wear!), nude pumps and a matching nude top-handle bag. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> All In Favor Double Breasted Midi Dress, $35.40 (orig. $59); <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fall-in-favor-double-breasted-midi-dress%2F5267143&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Privacy Please Leandra Midi Dress, $188; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201907,I/https://www.revolve.com/privacy-please-leandra-midi-dress/dp/PRIP-WD811/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a> Whistles Microspot Midi Dress, $339; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fwhistles-microspot-midi-dress%2F5337753&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Urban CoCo Short Sleeve Waisted Slim Fit Midi Dress, $18.98; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Urban-CoCo-Womens-Sleeve-Waisted/dp/B07S1FFJZG/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=green+midi+dress+women&qid=1563380417&s=gateway&sr=8-31&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfkatemiddletonsummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=0e9f5c61ad06b6dd9ffbbcdb84852186&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> & Other Stories Linen Blend Puff Sleeve Dress, $119; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=41994&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.stories.com%2Fen_usd%2Fclothing%2Fdresses%2Fproduct.linen-blend-puff-sleeve-dress-green.0727837001.html&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:stories.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">stories.com</a>
Kate Middleton attended the Women’s Single Finals Wimbledon with Pippa Middleton and Meghan Markle wearing a green Dolce & Gabbana midi dress with button detail (a royal re-wear!), nude pumps and a matching nude top-handle bag. Get the Look! All In Favor Double Breasted Midi Dress, $35.40 (orig. $59); nordstrom.com Privacy Please Leandra Midi Dress, $188; revolve.com Whistles Microspot Midi Dress, $339; nordstrom.com Urban CoCo Short Sleeve Waisted Slim Fit Midi Dress, $18.98; amazon.com & Other Stories Linen Blend Puff Sleeve Dress, $119; stories.com
The Duchess of Cambridge <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-surprises-wimbledon-fans-and-not-in-the-royal-box/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon</a> wearing a chic puff-sleeve white shirt dress with a black Alexander McQueen belt. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Kate Spade New York Button Front Midi Dress, $298; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fkate-spade-new-york-button-front-midi-sundress%2F5340123&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> ASOS Design Button Through Maxi Dress in Seersucker, $56; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=35719&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fus.asos.com%2Fasos-design%2Fasos-design-button-through-maxi-dress-in-seersucker%2Fprd%2F11943526&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:asos.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">asos.com</a> Heartloom Carson Dress, $130; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201907,I/https://www.revolve.com/heartloom-carson-dress/dp/HEAR-WD203/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a> ASOS Design Button Through Midi Dress with Puff Sleeves and Buckle Belt in Self Stripe, $67; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=35719&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fus.asos.com%2Fasos-design%2Fasos-design-button-through-midi-dress-with-puff-sleeves-and-buckle-belt-in-self-stripe%2Fprd%2F12180479&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:asos.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">asos.com</a> L’Academie The Yvon Midi Dress, $248; <a href="http://www.anrdoezrs.net/links/8029122/type/dlg/sid/PEO,Shopping:EverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton’sSummerStyle,kamiphillips2,Unc,Gal,7115494,201907,I/https://www.revolve.com/lacademie-the-yvon-midi-dress/dp/LCDE-WD214/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:revolve.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">revolve.com</a>
The Duchess of Cambridge cheered on a tennis match at Wimbledon wearing a chic puff-sleeve white shirt dress with a black Alexander McQueen belt. Get the Look! Kate Spade New York Button Front Midi Dress, $298; nordstrom.com ASOS Design Button Through Maxi Dress in Seersucker, $56; asos.com Heartloom Carson Dress, $130; revolve.com ASOS Design Button Through Midi Dress with Puff Sleeves and Buckle Belt in Self Stripe, $67; asos.com L’Academie The Yvon Midi Dress, $248; revolve.com
The Duchess of Cambridge went on <a href="https://people.com/royals/kate-middleton-prince-william-wimbledon-date-2019/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon</a> wearing a light blue Emilia Wickstead dress and nude pumps. <strong>Get the Look!</strong> Gal Meets Glam Collection Hilary Clip Dot Chiffon Midi Dress, $168; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fgal-meets-glam-collection-hilary-clip-dot-chiffon-midi-dress%2F4920307&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> MUXXN Women's 1950s Retro Vintage Cap Sleeve Party Swing Dress, $36.99; <a href="https://www.amazon.com/MUXXN-Audry-Hepburn-Style-Graduation/dp/B07TB1JS4M/ref=as_li_ss_tl?keywords=light+blue+midi+dress+women&qid=1563381439&s=gateway&sr=8-39&linkCode=ll1&tag=poamzfkatemiddletonsummerstyle2019kphillips0719-20&linkId=79346507e072691aa83bf0824910e15f&language=en_US" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:amazon.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">amazon.com</a> Gal Meets Glam Collection Addison Cotton Tie Waist Fit & Flare Wrap Dress, $188; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=1237&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fshop.nordstrom.com%2Fs%2Fgal-meets-glam-collection-addison-cotton-tie-waist-fit-flare-wrap-dress%2F4952604&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:nordstrom.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">nordstrom.com</a> Kate Spade New York Denim Faux-Wrap Dress, $278; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fkate-spade-new-york-denim-faux-wrap-dress%3FID%3D3331618&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a> Sau Lee Emma Lace Dress, $460; <a href="https://click.linksynergy.com/deeplink?id=93xLBvPhAeE&mid=13867&murl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bloomingdales.com%2Fshop%2Fproduct%2Fsau-lee-emma-lace-dress%3FID%3D3253437&u1=PEO%2CShopping%3AEverythingYouNeedtoCopyKateMiddleton%E2%80%99sSummerStyle%2Ckamiphillips2%2CUnc%2CGal%2C7115494%2C201907%2CI" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:bloomingdales.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">bloomingdales.com</a>
The Duchess of Cambridge went on a daytime date with husband Prince William to watch the Gentlemen’s Singles Final at Wimbledon wearing a light blue Emilia Wickstead dress and nude pumps. Get the Look! Gal Meets Glam Collection Hilary Clip Dot Chiffon Midi Dress, $168; nordstrom.com MUXXN Women's 1950s Retro Vintage Cap Sleeve Party Swing Dress, $36.99; amazon.com Gal Meets Glam Collection Addison Cotton Tie Waist Fit & Flare Wrap Dress, $188; nordstrom.com Kate Spade New York Denim Faux-Wrap Dress, $278; bloomingdales.com Sau Lee Emma Lace Dress, $460; bloomingdales.com
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
How Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Are Bonding Over Motherhood: ‘Their Relationship Is Strengthening’
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
How Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Are Bonding Over Motherhood: ‘Their Relationship Is Strengthening’
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
How Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Are Bonding Over Motherhood: ‘Their Relationship Is Strengthening’
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
How Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton Are Bonding Over Motherhood: ‘Their Relationship Is Strengthening’
Megan and Kate's connection is putting reports of a royal rift behind them, especially after the charming moments they shared at Wimbledon
The mixed doubles pairing of Andy Murray and Serena Williams delighted Wimbledon this year - PA
Wimbledon reminds us why sport must wake up to the potency of mixed events
The mixed doubles pairing of Andy Murray and Serena Williams delighted Wimbledon this year - PA
The mixed doubles pairing of Andy Murray and Serena Williams delighted Wimbledon this year - PA
Wimbledon reminds us why sport must wake up to the potency of mixed events
The mixed doubles pairing of Andy Murray and Serena Williams delighted Wimbledon this year - PA
WPA PoolTraditionally the royals walk a fine balance at public events and when meeting celebrities and members of the public.They try to take an interest and perhaps share a joke but, they tend to stop short of disclosing personal details.Now footage has surfaced of Meghan Markle appearing to break that cardinal rule by perhaps oversharing in a candid exchange with Pharrell Williams in which she appeared to suggest she is struggling to cope with royal life.The encounter happened at the premiere for the new Disney remake of The Lion King on Sunday (stealing the Wimbledon thunder from Kate Middleton) and began with Harry commenting on Pharrell’s outfit, a combination of a tux and shorts.Meghan Hugs Beyoncé, and Totally Steals Kate Middleton’s Wimbledon ThunderPharrell then said to Harry and Meghan; “I’m so happy for your union. Love is amazing. It’s wonderful… Don’t ever take that for granted, but what it means in today’s climate, I just wanted to tell you it’s so significant for so many of us. Seriously.”Meghan replied: “That’s so kind of you to say.” Pharrell wasn’t done however and said: “I mean this. It’s significant. We cheer you guys on.” Meghan reached out and touched him on the arm, saying: “Oh thank you. They don’t make it easy.”Pharrell then appeared to say, after a whispered exchange, “So you understand the significance. It’s beautiful.”With video of the exchange now going viral on Twitter, an online debate is raging about exactly what Meghan is referring to. U.K. papers, never wanting to pass up any opportunity to do so, have used the exchange as an excuse to attack Meghan, with the Mirror, for example, saying she was “moaning about life in the public eye.” In fact, Meghan said or implied nothing about being “in the public eye,” nor did Pharrell, as the clip clearly shows.While her unguarded comment clearly shows she has struggled to adapt to her new role, it seems likely that Pharrell was praising, in her marriage to Harry, the arrival of the first biracial woman in the British royal family as symbol of tolerance, and Meghan was responding to that.The resulting furor might, however, provide an indication to Meghan of why the royals so often conclude that, when it comes to publicly expressing opinion, discretion is better than forthright declaration.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
Meghan Tells Pharrell: ‘They Don’t Make It Easy.’ But What Did She Mean?
WPA PoolTraditionally the royals walk a fine balance at public events and when meeting celebrities and members of the public.They try to take an interest and perhaps share a joke but, they tend to stop short of disclosing personal details.Now footage has surfaced of Meghan Markle appearing to break that cardinal rule by perhaps oversharing in a candid exchange with Pharrell Williams in which she appeared to suggest she is struggling to cope with royal life.The encounter happened at the premiere for the new Disney remake of The Lion King on Sunday (stealing the Wimbledon thunder from Kate Middleton) and began with Harry commenting on Pharrell’s outfit, a combination of a tux and shorts.Meghan Hugs Beyoncé, and Totally Steals Kate Middleton’s Wimbledon ThunderPharrell then said to Harry and Meghan; “I’m so happy for your union. Love is amazing. It’s wonderful… Don’t ever take that for granted, but what it means in today’s climate, I just wanted to tell you it’s so significant for so many of us. Seriously.”Meghan replied: “That’s so kind of you to say.” Pharrell wasn’t done however and said: “I mean this. It’s significant. We cheer you guys on.” Meghan reached out and touched him on the arm, saying: “Oh thank you. They don’t make it easy.”Pharrell then appeared to say, after a whispered exchange, “So you understand the significance. It’s beautiful.”With video of the exchange now going viral on Twitter, an online debate is raging about exactly what Meghan is referring to. U.K. papers, never wanting to pass up any opportunity to do so, have used the exchange as an excuse to attack Meghan, with the Mirror, for example, saying she was “moaning about life in the public eye.” In fact, Meghan said or implied nothing about being “in the public eye,” nor did Pharrell, as the clip clearly shows.While her unguarded comment clearly shows she has struggled to adapt to her new role, it seems likely that Pharrell was praising, in her marriage to Harry, the arrival of the first biracial woman in the British royal family as symbol of tolerance, and Meghan was responding to that.The resulting furor might, however, provide an indication to Meghan of why the royals so often conclude that, when it comes to publicly expressing opinion, discretion is better than forthright declaration.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
United States's Frances Tiafoe, left, and Venus Williams laugh during their Mixed Doubles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Friday, July 5, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
United States's Frances Tiafoe, left, and Venus Williams laugh during their Mixed Doubles match during day five of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Friday, July 5, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Andnot for her facial expressions
The only story bigger than the 2019 Wimbledon men's finals: Mirka Federer's engagement ring
Andnot for her facial expressions
Andnot for her facial expressions
The only story bigger than the 2019 Wimbledon men's finals: Mirka Federer's engagement ring
Andnot for her facial expressions
Here's the most recent top news in Raleigh; see what headlines are trending among local readers, with links to full articles.
Top Raleigh news: Raleigh teen wins at Wimbledon; air conditioning repair costs soar; more
Here's the most recent top news in Raleigh; see what headlines are trending among local readers, with links to full articles.
kate middleton meghan markle pippa
The best fashion looks Kate Middleton, Meghan Markle, and Pippa Middleton have ever worn to Wimbledon
kate middleton meghan markle pippa
David Beckham is all smiles in the Royal Box on Centre Court on day 10 of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London on Thursday.
A 'Royally' Good View
David Beckham is all smiles in the Royal Box on Centre Court on day 10 of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London on Thursday.
Claire Foy sits nervously in the crowd during day 10 of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Thursday in London.
Face in the Crowd
Claire Foy sits nervously in the crowd during day 10 of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club on Thursday in London.
Culture minister Jeremy Wright has refused to commit to adding cricket to the “crown jewel” list of live sport on free-to-air television.It follows calls by MPs for the Cricket World Cup and the Ashes to be made available to a wider audience following England’s triumph against New Zealand at Lord’s.Asked if major cricket tournaments should be elevated to the same status as Wimbledon, Mr Wright said it was important not to cut off the sport’s existing revenue stream from pay TV.“If we want to see the kind of success that we saw … then you have to make sure that the funding is also there,” the secretary of state for culture, media and sport told the BBC.Mr Wright said he wanted to balance "the money we need into the sport at the grassroots level and the professional level … against wanting as many people to see cricket as we can get.”Writing in The Telegraph following England’s last gasp victory at Lord’s, Mr Wright said it was up to cricket bodies to “encourage as much live sport to be as accessible as possible, whether that’s on free to air or other public sources” without compromising income from pay TV deals.Novak Djokovic’s victory in the men’s final at Wimbledon was watched by 9.6 million viewers, eclipsing the combined total of 8 million people who saw England win the Cricket World Cup final on Sky and Channel 4.> What a match. Incredible end to a fantastic WorldCup Come on @ECB_cricket let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV. Congratulations England and New Zealand> > — Clive Efford (@CliveEfford) > > July 14, 2019Labour MP Clive Efford, a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee member, was among those calling for crown jewel status. “Let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV.”Tory MP Tracey Crouch, the former sports minister, suggested the growing popularity of women’s football following widespread BBC coverage showed why a rethink in broadcasting policy was needed.“I really think that given the viewing figures for both the women’s football World Cup and men’s Cricket World Cup final, sport needs to reflect on whether broadcast deals should be about the money or the impact of more people watching,” she said.A peak audience of 11.7 million viewers watched England’s defeat to the USA in the Women’s World Cup semi-final earlier this month – a record for women’s football.
Tory minister refuses to commit to free-to-air 'crown jewel' status for England cricket matches after World Cup win
Culture minister Jeremy Wright has refused to commit to adding cricket to the “crown jewel” list of live sport on free-to-air television.It follows calls by MPs for the Cricket World Cup and the Ashes to be made available to a wider audience following England’s triumph against New Zealand at Lord’s.Asked if major cricket tournaments should be elevated to the same status as Wimbledon, Mr Wright said it was important not to cut off the sport’s existing revenue stream from pay TV.“If we want to see the kind of success that we saw … then you have to make sure that the funding is also there,” the secretary of state for culture, media and sport told the BBC.Mr Wright said he wanted to balance "the money we need into the sport at the grassroots level and the professional level … against wanting as many people to see cricket as we can get.”Writing in The Telegraph following England’s last gasp victory at Lord’s, Mr Wright said it was up to cricket bodies to “encourage as much live sport to be as accessible as possible, whether that’s on free to air or other public sources” without compromising income from pay TV deals.Novak Djokovic’s victory in the men’s final at Wimbledon was watched by 9.6 million viewers, eclipsing the combined total of 8 million people who saw England win the Cricket World Cup final on Sky and Channel 4.> What a match. Incredible end to a fantastic WorldCup Come on @ECB_cricket let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV. Congratulations England and New Zealand> > — Clive Efford (@CliveEfford) > > July 14, 2019Labour MP Clive Efford, a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee member, was among those calling for crown jewel status. “Let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV.”Tory MP Tracey Crouch, the former sports minister, suggested the growing popularity of women’s football following widespread BBC coverage showed why a rethink in broadcasting policy was needed.“I really think that given the viewing figures for both the women’s football World Cup and men’s Cricket World Cup final, sport needs to reflect on whether broadcast deals should be about the money or the impact of more people watching,” she said.A peak audience of 11.7 million viewers watched England’s defeat to the USA in the Women’s World Cup semi-final earlier this month – a record for women’s football.
Culture minister Jeremy Wright has refused to commit to adding cricket to the “crown jewel” list of live sport on free-to-air television.It follows calls by MPs for the Cricket World Cup and the Ashes to be made available to a wider audience following England’s triumph against New Zealand at Lord’s.Asked if major cricket tournaments should be elevated to the same status as Wimbledon, Mr Wright said it was important not to cut off the sport’s existing revenue stream from pay TV.“If we want to see the kind of success that we saw … then you have to make sure that the funding is also there,” the secretary of state for culture, media and sport told the BBC.Mr Wright said he wanted to balance "the money we need into the sport at the grassroots level and the professional level … against wanting as many people to see cricket as we can get.”Writing in The Telegraph following England’s last gasp victory at Lord’s, Mr Wright said it was up to cricket bodies to “encourage as much live sport to be as accessible as possible, whether that’s on free to air or other public sources” without compromising income from pay TV deals.Novak Djokovic’s victory in the men’s final at Wimbledon was watched by 9.6 million viewers, eclipsing the combined total of 8 million people who saw England win the Cricket World Cup final on Sky and Channel 4.> What a match. Incredible end to a fantastic WorldCup Come on @ECB_cricket let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV. Congratulations England and New Zealand> > — Clive Efford (@CliveEfford) > > July 14, 2019Labour MP Clive Efford, a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee member, was among those calling for crown jewel status. “Let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV.”Tory MP Tracey Crouch, the former sports minister, suggested the growing popularity of women’s football following widespread BBC coverage showed why a rethink in broadcasting policy was needed.“I really think that given the viewing figures for both the women’s football World Cup and men’s Cricket World Cup final, sport needs to reflect on whether broadcast deals should be about the money or the impact of more people watching,” she said.A peak audience of 11.7 million viewers watched England’s defeat to the USA in the Women’s World Cup semi-final earlier this month – a record for women’s football.
Tory minister refuses to commit to free-to-air 'crown jewel' status for England cricket matches after World Cup win
Culture minister Jeremy Wright has refused to commit to adding cricket to the “crown jewel” list of live sport on free-to-air television.It follows calls by MPs for the Cricket World Cup and the Ashes to be made available to a wider audience following England’s triumph against New Zealand at Lord’s.Asked if major cricket tournaments should be elevated to the same status as Wimbledon, Mr Wright said it was important not to cut off the sport’s existing revenue stream from pay TV.“If we want to see the kind of success that we saw … then you have to make sure that the funding is also there,” the secretary of state for culture, media and sport told the BBC.Mr Wright said he wanted to balance "the money we need into the sport at the grassroots level and the professional level … against wanting as many people to see cricket as we can get.”Writing in The Telegraph following England’s last gasp victory at Lord’s, Mr Wright said it was up to cricket bodies to “encourage as much live sport to be as accessible as possible, whether that’s on free to air or other public sources” without compromising income from pay TV deals.Novak Djokovic’s victory in the men’s final at Wimbledon was watched by 9.6 million viewers, eclipsing the combined total of 8 million people who saw England win the Cricket World Cup final on Sky and Channel 4.> What a match. Incredible end to a fantastic WorldCup Come on @ECB_cricket let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV. Congratulations England and New Zealand> > — Clive Efford (@CliveEfford) > > July 14, 2019Labour MP Clive Efford, a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee member, was among those calling for crown jewel status. “Let’s have more cricket in terrestrial TV for the sake of the next generation. These players deserve to be household names not hidden away on pay to view TV.”Tory MP Tracey Crouch, the former sports minister, suggested the growing popularity of women’s football following widespread BBC coverage showed why a rethink in broadcasting policy was needed.“I really think that given the viewing figures for both the women’s football World Cup and men’s Cricket World Cup final, sport needs to reflect on whether broadcast deals should be about the money or the impact of more people watching,” she said.A peak audience of 11.7 million viewers watched England’s defeat to the USA in the Women’s World Cup semi-final earlier this month – a record for women’s football.
England’s World Cup victory can spark a grassroots boom in every corner of the country.At least that’s the what the ECB hope after Eoin Morgan’s stunning Super Over win against New Zealand at Lords on Sunday.England began the World Cup with the sole aim of winning the tournament. The ECB, meanwhile, was also intent on using the tournament as a means of mobilising a new generation of cricketers.Whether that ambition comes similarly to fruition, only time will. Last week the ECB, along with the ICC trumpeted their achievement of getting over one million children aged between five and 12 involved with the sport over the course of the tournament.The hard work of ensuring a long-term legacy, though, starts now. And as rugby union proved after the 2003 World Cup win in Australia, achieving that is often easier said than done.Nick Pryde, the ECB’s director of participation and growth, tells The Independent that as well as attracting new players to the sport, it’s also essential to keep young players involved in the game for as long as possible.“We know that it’s particularly difficult around those teenage years to keep players in the game,” he says. “That’s clearly going to be a really important focus but that’s why special moments like hosting a World Cup on home soil are really important to capture the hearts and the minds of the next generation of cricketers.“There’s no denying that, as in a number of team sports, there are a number of challenges, particularly when it comes to participation.”Pryde was part of the Cricket Australia team during the 2015 World Cup and saw at first hand the impact that that tournament – which was also won by the hosts – had when it came to getting more people, young and old, involved in the sport.“What tournaments do is drive engagement,” says Pryde. “We saw in Australia that more kids were inspired to pick up the bat and the ball. That’s probably amplified further when the home team gets to lift the trophy. You see that here, whether it’s Wimbledon or the football World Cup – major events drive play.“On the back of getting one million kids involved in the game, we want to see their involvement sustained, we want to see these youngsters get involved in clubs but will also want to encourage the volunteers who essentially underpin the health of cricket in this country.”Gibson is a coach at Cockermouth Cricket Club, where Ben Stokes learnt his trade as a player following his move from New Zealand to Cumbria – and he believes that building a lasting legacy will be a tough task. But like England’s run chase against the Kiwis, not impossible. “I think we’ve lost a generation,” says Jon Gibson, a cricket coach who worked closely with Stokes as a youngster. “I’m dealing with parents who don’t necessarily understand the game and that's something completely new to me. “I was encouraging people a couple of days before the final to go to Channel 4 because the more people sitting in their lounge watching cricket on terrestrial television, the more powerful the message.“There were over 100 people at the club (on Sunday) watching Ben and England, players who played with him, old school-mates and even those who weren’t born when he played for Cockermouth.“I hope that if this win does anything, it enthuses the nation. If we hadn’t had won the World Cup then I would have been more than a little worried about the grassroots future of the club game in this country because it has been teetering. That win will help.”Essential for the legacy of this first World Cup win is for cricket to permeate diverse communities up and down the country, something that Lord Kamlesh Patel of Bradford, the chair of the ECB South Asian Advisory Group, knows only too well.At the start of the month, with England’s future in the competition still in the balance after their loss to Australia in the group stage of the competition, he told The Independent that role models were critical.“Players such as Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are crucial because it’s about heroes, it’s about kids looking at these players and saying to themselves ‘I can be that person’,” he said at the launch of a new 24-hour Urban Cricket Centre in Leyton, East London.“What was very interesting and what we’ve learnt over the past year and a half is that Moeen and Adil are heroes to a lot of kids but, because of the IPL, a lot of Asian kids also look at the likes of Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer and want to play the game because of them as well.“It’s not about the colour of your skin or where you come from. It’s about having those heroes that resonate with the kind of exciting cricket that these kids want to watch and play.”The good news, however, has already started rolling in. Having just returned from a net session at Cockermouth on Monday night, Gibson claims to have already seen the ‘Stokes Effect’ in action. “We had two new players arrive and ask if they could get involved at nets this evening,” he says. “That’s a great sign.“Sunday at Lord’s gripped the nation. People who have never really watched cricket before have said to me that this was one of the most extraordinary sporting events they had ever seen. We need to make the most of that.”It could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
Cricket must take it’s once-in-a-lifetime chance to spark a grassroots boom and secure the World Cup’s legacy
England’s World Cup victory can spark a grassroots boom in every corner of the country.At least that’s the what the ECB hope after Eoin Morgan’s stunning Super Over win against New Zealand at Lords on Sunday.England began the World Cup with the sole aim of winning the tournament. The ECB, meanwhile, was also intent on using the tournament as a means of mobilising a new generation of cricketers.Whether that ambition comes similarly to fruition, only time will. Last week the ECB, along with the ICC trumpeted their achievement of getting over one million children aged between five and 12 involved with the sport over the course of the tournament.The hard work of ensuring a long-term legacy, though, starts now. And as rugby union proved after the 2003 World Cup win in Australia, achieving that is often easier said than done.Nick Pryde, the ECB’s director of participation and growth, tells The Independent that as well as attracting new players to the sport, it’s also essential to keep young players involved in the game for as long as possible.“We know that it’s particularly difficult around those teenage years to keep players in the game,” he says. “That’s clearly going to be a really important focus but that’s why special moments like hosting a World Cup on home soil are really important to capture the hearts and the minds of the next generation of cricketers.“There’s no denying that, as in a number of team sports, there are a number of challenges, particularly when it comes to participation.”Pryde was part of the Cricket Australia team during the 2015 World Cup and saw at first hand the impact that that tournament – which was also won by the hosts – had when it came to getting more people, young and old, involved in the sport.“What tournaments do is drive engagement,” says Pryde. “We saw in Australia that more kids were inspired to pick up the bat and the ball. That’s probably amplified further when the home team gets to lift the trophy. You see that here, whether it’s Wimbledon or the football World Cup – major events drive play.“On the back of getting one million kids involved in the game, we want to see their involvement sustained, we want to see these youngsters get involved in clubs but will also want to encourage the volunteers who essentially underpin the health of cricket in this country.”Gibson is a coach at Cockermouth Cricket Club, where Ben Stokes learnt his trade as a player following his move from New Zealand to Cumbria – and he believes that building a lasting legacy will be a tough task. But like England’s run chase against the Kiwis, not impossible. “I think we’ve lost a generation,” says Jon Gibson, a cricket coach who worked closely with Stokes as a youngster. “I’m dealing with parents who don’t necessarily understand the game and that's something completely new to me. “I was encouraging people a couple of days before the final to go to Channel 4 because the more people sitting in their lounge watching cricket on terrestrial television, the more powerful the message.“There were over 100 people at the club (on Sunday) watching Ben and England, players who played with him, old school-mates and even those who weren’t born when he played for Cockermouth.“I hope that if this win does anything, it enthuses the nation. If we hadn’t had won the World Cup then I would have been more than a little worried about the grassroots future of the club game in this country because it has been teetering. That win will help.”Essential for the legacy of this first World Cup win is for cricket to permeate diverse communities up and down the country, something that Lord Kamlesh Patel of Bradford, the chair of the ECB South Asian Advisory Group, knows only too well.At the start of the month, with England’s future in the competition still in the balance after their loss to Australia in the group stage of the competition, he told The Independent that role models were critical.“Players such as Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are crucial because it’s about heroes, it’s about kids looking at these players and saying to themselves ‘I can be that person’,” he said at the launch of a new 24-hour Urban Cricket Centre in Leyton, East London.“What was very interesting and what we’ve learnt over the past year and a half is that Moeen and Adil are heroes to a lot of kids but, because of the IPL, a lot of Asian kids also look at the likes of Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer and want to play the game because of them as well.“It’s not about the colour of your skin or where you come from. It’s about having those heroes that resonate with the kind of exciting cricket that these kids want to watch and play.”The good news, however, has already started rolling in. Having just returned from a net session at Cockermouth on Monday night, Gibson claims to have already seen the ‘Stokes Effect’ in action. “We had two new players arrive and ask if they could get involved at nets this evening,” he says. “That’s a great sign.“Sunday at Lord’s gripped the nation. People who have never really watched cricket before have said to me that this was one of the most extraordinary sporting events they had ever seen. We need to make the most of that.”It could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
England’s World Cup victory can spark a grassroots boom in every corner of the country.At least that’s the what the ECB hope after Eoin Morgan’s stunning Super Over win against New Zealand at Lords on Sunday.England began the World Cup with the sole aim of winning the tournament. The ECB, meanwhile, was also intent on using the tournament as a means of mobilising a new generation of cricketers.Whether that ambition comes similarly to fruition, only time will. Last week the ECB, along with the ICC trumpeted their achievement of getting over one million children aged between five and 12 involved with the sport over the course of the tournament.The hard work of ensuring a long-term legacy, though, starts now. And as rugby union proved after the 2003 World Cup win in Australia, achieving that is often easier said than done.Nick Pryde, the ECB’s director of participation and growth, tells The Independent that as well as attracting new players to the sport, it’s also essential to keep young players involved in the game for as long as possible.“We know that it’s particularly difficult around those teenage years to keep players in the game,” he says. “That’s clearly going to be a really important focus but that’s why special moments like hosting a World Cup on home soil are really important to capture the hearts and the minds of the next generation of cricketers.“There’s no denying that, as in a number of team sports, there are a number of challenges, particularly when it comes to participation.”Pryde was part of the Cricket Australia team during the 2015 World Cup and saw at first hand the impact that that tournament – which was also won by the hosts – had when it came to getting more people, young and old, involved in the sport.“What tournaments do is drive engagement,” says Pryde. “We saw in Australia that more kids were inspired to pick up the bat and the ball. That’s probably amplified further when the home team gets to lift the trophy. You see that here, whether it’s Wimbledon or the football World Cup – major events drive play.“On the back of getting one million kids involved in the game, we want to see their involvement sustained, we want to see these youngsters get involved in clubs but will also want to encourage the volunteers who essentially underpin the health of cricket in this country.”Gibson is a coach at Cockermouth Cricket Club, where Ben Stokes learnt his trade as a player following his move from New Zealand to Cumbria – and he believes that building a lasting legacy will be a tough task. But like England’s run chase against the Kiwis, not impossible. “I think we’ve lost a generation,” says Jon Gibson, a cricket coach who worked closely with Stokes as a youngster. “I’m dealing with parents who don’t necessarily understand the game and that's something completely new to me. “I was encouraging people a couple of days before the final to go to Channel 4 because the more people sitting in their lounge watching cricket on terrestrial television, the more powerful the message.“There were over 100 people at the club (on Sunday) watching Ben and England, players who played with him, old school-mates and even those who weren’t born when he played for Cockermouth.“I hope that if this win does anything, it enthuses the nation. If we hadn’t had won the World Cup then I would have been more than a little worried about the grassroots future of the club game in this country because it has been teetering. That win will help.”Essential for the legacy of this first World Cup win is for cricket to permeate diverse communities up and down the country, something that Lord Kamlesh Patel of Bradford, the chair of the ECB South Asian Advisory Group, knows only too well.At the start of the month, with England’s future in the competition still in the balance after their loss to Australia in the group stage of the competition, he told The Independent that role models were critical.“Players such as Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are crucial because it’s about heroes, it’s about kids looking at these players and saying to themselves ‘I can be that person’,” he said at the launch of a new 24-hour Urban Cricket Centre in Leyton, East London.“What was very interesting and what we’ve learnt over the past year and a half is that Moeen and Adil are heroes to a lot of kids but, because of the IPL, a lot of Asian kids also look at the likes of Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer and want to play the game because of them as well.“It’s not about the colour of your skin or where you come from. It’s about having those heroes that resonate with the kind of exciting cricket that these kids want to watch and play.”The good news, however, has already started rolling in. Having just returned from a net session at Cockermouth on Monday night, Gibson claims to have already seen the ‘Stokes Effect’ in action. “We had two new players arrive and ask if they could get involved at nets this evening,” he says. “That’s a great sign.“Sunday at Lord’s gripped the nation. People who have never really watched cricket before have said to me that this was one of the most extraordinary sporting events they had ever seen. We need to make the most of that.”It could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
Cricket must take it’s once-in-a-lifetime chance to spark a grassroots boom and secure the World Cup’s legacy
England’s World Cup victory can spark a grassroots boom in every corner of the country.At least that’s the what the ECB hope after Eoin Morgan’s stunning Super Over win against New Zealand at Lords on Sunday.England began the World Cup with the sole aim of winning the tournament. The ECB, meanwhile, was also intent on using the tournament as a means of mobilising a new generation of cricketers.Whether that ambition comes similarly to fruition, only time will. Last week the ECB, along with the ICC trumpeted their achievement of getting over one million children aged between five and 12 involved with the sport over the course of the tournament.The hard work of ensuring a long-term legacy, though, starts now. And as rugby union proved after the 2003 World Cup win in Australia, achieving that is often easier said than done.Nick Pryde, the ECB’s director of participation and growth, tells The Independent that as well as attracting new players to the sport, it’s also essential to keep young players involved in the game for as long as possible.“We know that it’s particularly difficult around those teenage years to keep players in the game,” he says. “That’s clearly going to be a really important focus but that’s why special moments like hosting a World Cup on home soil are really important to capture the hearts and the minds of the next generation of cricketers.“There’s no denying that, as in a number of team sports, there are a number of challenges, particularly when it comes to participation.”Pryde was part of the Cricket Australia team during the 2015 World Cup and saw at first hand the impact that that tournament – which was also won by the hosts – had when it came to getting more people, young and old, involved in the sport.“What tournaments do is drive engagement,” says Pryde. “We saw in Australia that more kids were inspired to pick up the bat and the ball. That’s probably amplified further when the home team gets to lift the trophy. You see that here, whether it’s Wimbledon or the football World Cup – major events drive play.“On the back of getting one million kids involved in the game, we want to see their involvement sustained, we want to see these youngsters get involved in clubs but will also want to encourage the volunteers who essentially underpin the health of cricket in this country.”Gibson is a coach at Cockermouth Cricket Club, where Ben Stokes learnt his trade as a player following his move from New Zealand to Cumbria – and he believes that building a lasting legacy will be a tough task. But like England’s run chase against the Kiwis, not impossible. “I think we’ve lost a generation,” says Jon Gibson, a cricket coach who worked closely with Stokes as a youngster. “I’m dealing with parents who don’t necessarily understand the game and that's something completely new to me. “I was encouraging people a couple of days before the final to go to Channel 4 because the more people sitting in their lounge watching cricket on terrestrial television, the more powerful the message.“There were over 100 people at the club (on Sunday) watching Ben and England, players who played with him, old school-mates and even those who weren’t born when he played for Cockermouth.“I hope that if this win does anything, it enthuses the nation. If we hadn’t had won the World Cup then I would have been more than a little worried about the grassroots future of the club game in this country because it has been teetering. That win will help.”Essential for the legacy of this first World Cup win is for cricket to permeate diverse communities up and down the country, something that Lord Kamlesh Patel of Bradford, the chair of the ECB South Asian Advisory Group, knows only too well.At the start of the month, with England’s future in the competition still in the balance after their loss to Australia in the group stage of the competition, he told The Independent that role models were critical.“Players such as Adil Rashid and Moeen Ali are crucial because it’s about heroes, it’s about kids looking at these players and saying to themselves ‘I can be that person’,” he said at the launch of a new 24-hour Urban Cricket Centre in Leyton, East London.“What was very interesting and what we’ve learnt over the past year and a half is that Moeen and Adil are heroes to a lot of kids but, because of the IPL, a lot of Asian kids also look at the likes of Jos Buttler and Ben Stokes and Jofra Archer and want to play the game because of them as well.“It’s not about the colour of your skin or where you come from. It’s about having those heroes that resonate with the kind of exciting cricket that these kids want to watch and play.”The good news, however, has already started rolling in. Having just returned from a net session at Cockermouth on Monday night, Gibson claims to have already seen the ‘Stokes Effect’ in action. “We had two new players arrive and ask if they could get involved at nets this evening,” he says. “That’s a great sign.“Sunday at Lord’s gripped the nation. People who have never really watched cricket before have said to me that this was one of the most extraordinary sporting events they had ever seen. We need to make the most of that.”It could be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.
Los colombianos Juan Sebastián Cabal (izquierda) y Robert Farah levantan sus trofeos tras ganar la final de dobles de Wimbledon ante los franceses Nicolas Mahut y edouard Roger Vasselin, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019 (AP Foto/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
CABAL-FARAH-CONDECORACION
Los colombianos Juan Sebastián Cabal (izquierda) y Robert Farah levantan sus trofeos tras ganar la final de dobles de Wimbledon ante los franceses Nicolas Mahut y edouard Roger Vasselin, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019 (AP Foto/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
'GMA' Hot List: Joel McHale shares cute pics of his dogs
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
'GMA' Hot List: Joel McHale shares cute pics of his dogs
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
'GMA' Hot List: Joel McHale shares cute pics of his dogs
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
'GMA' Hot List: Joel McHale shares cute pics of his dogs
Plus, Woody Harrelson stole the show at Wimbledon after he was barred by a security guard from reentering while the game was in play.
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney: Novak defeats Federer for fifth Wimbledon title
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney: Novak defeats Federer for fifth Wimbledon title
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney: Novak defeats Federer for fifth Wimbledon title
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Tiki and Tierney: Novak defeats Federer for fifth Wimbledon title
Tiki and Tierney discuss the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Novak Djokovic: 'I wasn’t serving the best. Roger [Federer] was dictating play from the back of the court. So I fought a lot. I spent a lot of time during the match quite far behind the baseline. But I am accustomed to that.' - AFP
Longest ever Wimbledon final showed Roger Federer cannot shift mental block against Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic: 'I wasn’t serving the best. Roger [Federer] was dictating play from the back of the court. So I fought a lot. I spent a lot of time during the match quite far behind the baseline. But I am accustomed to that.' - AFP
Novak Djokovic: 'I wasn’t serving the best. Roger [Federer] was dictating play from the back of the court. So I fought a lot. I spent a lot of time during the match quite far behind the baseline. But I am accustomed to that.' - AFP
Longest ever Wimbledon final showed Roger Federer cannot shift mental block against Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic: 'I wasn’t serving the best. Roger [Federer] was dictating play from the back of the court. So I fought a lot. I spent a lot of time during the match quite far behind the baseline. But I am accustomed to that.' - AFP
Serbia's Novak Djokovic lifts the trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic lifts the trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy during the presentation after he defeated Switzerland's Roger Federer during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
APTOPIX Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic kisses the trophy during the presentation after he defeated Switzerland's Roger Federer during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
Kate Middleton exhibits hilarious facial expressions watching historic Wimbledon match
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
Kate Middleton exhibits hilarious facial expressions watching historic Wimbledon match
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
Kate Middleton exhibits hilarious facial expressions watching historic Wimbledon match
The royal mom of three was present for the match between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along with her husband, Prince William.
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
The Jim Rome Show: Novak Djokovic wins Wimbledon title
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
The Jim Rome Show: Novak Djokovic wins Wimbledon title
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
The Jim Rome Show: Novak Djokovic wins Wimbledon title
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
The Jim Rome Show: Novak Djokovic wins Wimbledon title
Jim Rome gives his take on the close match between Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer in the 2019 Wimbledon finals.
Switzerland's Roger Federer reacts during the press conference following his defeat by Serbia's Novak Djokovic in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Joe Toth, AELTC Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Switzerland's Roger Federer reacts during the press conference following his defeat by Serbia's Novak Djokovic in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Joe Toth, AELTC Pool Photo via AP)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic and Switzerland's Roger Federer walk with the trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic and Switzerland's Roger Federer walk with the trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic smiles during the press conference following his defeat of Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Joe Toth, AELTC Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic smiles during the press conference following his defeat of Switzerland's Roger Federer in the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Joe Toth, AELTC Pool Photo via AP)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic holds up the winners trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Will Oliver/Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic holds up the winners trophy after defeating Switzerland's Roger Federer during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Will Oliver/Pool Photo via AP)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, left, hugs Switzerland's Roger Federer after he defeats him during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Will Oliver/Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, left, hugs Switzerland's Roger Federer after he defeats him during the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (Will Oliver/Pool Photo via AP)
La rumana Simona Halep posa con el trofeo después de derrotar con facilidad a Serena Williams en la final de mujeres de Wimbledon, en Londres, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
RANKINGS
La rumana Simona Halep posa con el trofeo después de derrotar con facilidad a Serena Williams en la final de mujeres de Wimbledon, en Londres, el sábado 13 de julio de 2019. (AP Foto/Ben Curtis)
kendall jenner kate middleton meghan markle hugh grant wimbledon
From Kendall Jenner to Meghan Markle: Here are the stars who were spotted at Wimbledon this year
kendall jenner kate middleton meghan markle hugh grant wimbledon
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Halep scored her first win, while Djokovic celebrated his fifth, at the Wimbledon Champions Dinner
Tennis Takes London! See All of the Celebrities at Wimbledon This Year
Tennis Takes London! See All of the Celebrities at Wimbledon This Year
Tennis Takes London! See All of the Celebrities at Wimbledon This Year
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate Wimbledon Win
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate Wimbledon Win
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate Wimbledon Win
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate 'Magical' Wimbledon Victories at Champions Dinner
Novak Djokovic and Simona Halep Celebrate Wimbledon Win
Kate Middleton Receives Stan Smith Shoe for Prince Louis
Kate Middleton Receives a Surprise Gift for Prince Louis from a Tennis Legend at Wimbledon
Kate Middleton Receives Stan Smith Shoe for Prince Louis
Kate Middleton Receives Stan Smith Shoe for Prince Louis
Kate Middleton Receives a Surprise Gift for Prince Louis from a Tennis Legend at Wimbledon
Kate Middleton Receives Stan Smith Shoe for Prince Louis
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
Raleigh teen tennis player Abigail Forbes wins at Wimbledon
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
Raleigh teen tennis player Abigail Forbes wins at Wimbledon
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
Raleigh teen tennis player Abigail Forbes wins at Wimbledon
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
Raleigh teen tennis player Abigail Forbes wins at Wimbledon
A Raleigh teenager took home a Wimbledon trophy after winning the Girls' Doubles division.
"It's a little tradition obviously"
Resourceful Novak Djokovic Snacks on Grass to Celebrate His Wimbledon Win Because Champions Need Fuel
"It's a little tradition obviously"
Kate Middleton Wimbledon men's final
Kate Middleton looked like a real life Cinderella in a $1,740 Emilia Wickstead dress at Wimbledon
Kate Middleton Wimbledon men's final
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, right, and Switzerland's Roger Federer leave the court holding their trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, right, and Switzerland's Roger Federer leave the court holding their trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, right, and Switzerland's Roger Federer leave the court holding their trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Serbia's Novak Djokovic, right, and Switzerland's Roger Federer leave the court holding their trophies after the men's singles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Wimbledon Tennis Gauff Looks Ahead
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Winner Romania's Simona Halep and second placed United States' Serena Williams, right, pose with their trophies after the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
APTOPIX Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Winner Romania's Simona Halep and second placed United States' Serena Williams, right, pose with their trophies after the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Winner Romania's Simona Halep and second placed United States' Serena Williams, right, pose with their trophies after the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
APTOPIX Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Winner Romania's Simona Halep and second placed United States' Serena Williams, right, pose with their trophies after the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Wimbledon Tennis Gauff Looks Ahead
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Czech Republic's Barbora Strycova, right, and Taiwan's Su-Wei Hsieh celebrate defeating Canada's Gabriela Dabrowski and China's Yifan Xu in the women's doubles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Czech Republic's Barbora Strycova, right, and Taiwan's Su-Wei Hsieh celebrate defeating Canada's Gabriela Dabrowski and China's Yifan Xu in the women's doubles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Czech Republic's Barbora Strycova, right, and Taiwan's Su-Wei Hsieh celebrate defeating Canada's Gabriela Dabrowski and China's Yifan Xu in the women's doubles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Czech Republic's Barbora Strycova, right, and Taiwan's Su-Wei Hsieh celebrate defeating Canada's Gabriela Dabrowski and China's Yifan Xu in the women's doubles final match of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Sunday, July 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Tim Ireland)
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
It's back to Wimbledon for Kate Middleton, and this time she brought along Prince William to cheer courtside with her. The couple attended the Gentlemen's Singles Final to watch Roger Federer take on Novak Djokovic for the winning title.
Maybe when the fans start serenading Novak Djokovic in a Centre Court love-in it will be time for the Serb to call it a day.When he starts receiving the same adoration reserved almost exclusively for Roger Federer in Sunday’s epic Wimbledon final, maybe his resolve will soften, his hunger for the fight diminish, his love of “sticking it to them” fade.“Hopefully, in five years’ time I can be hearing the same chants,” the 32-year-old Serb said as he signed off his news conference following a five-set win over Federer which sealed a fifth Wimbledon title and 16th Grand Slam crown.Sunday’s triumph, in which he saved two match points and soaked up 94 winners off the Federer racket before clawing his way over the line in the longest Wimbledon singles final, confirmed Djokovic as the ultimate tennis anti-hero.Apart from those in his box, it seemed the entire crowd were rooting for Federer. They even booed him near the end when he angrily whacked a court-side microphone.He had the last laugh.While Federer and Rafael Nadal are still swinging their rackets, he will behind them in the popularity stakes.Sheer bloody-mindedness, as well as outrageous talent, is the reason Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, aged almost 38, 33 and 32 respectively, remain out of reach for their pursuers and the reason they share 54 Grand Slam titles, including the last 11.But while Federer paints the court with strokes of magic and the swashbuckling Nadal plays tennis like a superhero, Djokovic is the master of attrition, winning by a thousand cuts.Although he is arguably the best returner the game has ever seen, is the best athlete and has an engaging personality, there is only so much love to go around.For now Djokovic will not care, and if anything will use a perceived lack of fanfare for his incredible feats as fuel to keep collecting Grand Slam titles and move past Federer and Nadal to the top of the all-time list.“Whether I’m going to be able to do it or not, I don’t know. I mean, I’m not really looking at age as a restriction of any kind for me at least,” Djokovic, the only man since Rod Laver to have held all four Grand Slams simultaneously, said on Sunday.“It just depends how long I’m going to play, whether I’m going to have a chance to make historic number one or slams.“It depends not only on myself, it depends on circumstances in life.”Had Federer converted one of the two match points that came his way at 8-7 in the fifth set he would have moved six Grand Slams clear of Djokovic.Instead it is four, and having won five of the last six on offer Djokovic appears to be in the middle of a period of domination that shows no sign of ending.He will go into the US Open as red-hot favourite to retain his title and when next year begins he will have his eyes fixed on winning an eighth Australian Open crown.Former coach Boris Becker says the race is now on and believes all three will add to their tallies.But time, perhaps, is on Djokovic’s side.“He’s a year younger than Nadal and five younger than Federer – we all know he fancies overtaking them,” Becker said. “Honestly, I think he can, but I wouldn’t say that for sure.”
Wimbledon 2019: Novak Djokovic’s love of ‘sticking’ it to the crowds is fuelling his desire to be top dog
Maybe when the fans start serenading Novak Djokovic in a Centre Court love-in it will be time for the Serb to call it a day.When he starts receiving the same adoration reserved almost exclusively for Roger Federer in Sunday’s epic Wimbledon final, maybe his resolve will soften, his hunger for the fight diminish, his love of “sticking it to them” fade.“Hopefully, in five years’ time I can be hearing the same chants,” the 32-year-old Serb said as he signed off his news conference following a five-set win over Federer which sealed a fifth Wimbledon title and 16th Grand Slam crown.Sunday’s triumph, in which he saved two match points and soaked up 94 winners off the Federer racket before clawing his way over the line in the longest Wimbledon singles final, confirmed Djokovic as the ultimate tennis anti-hero.Apart from those in his box, it seemed the entire crowd were rooting for Federer. They even booed him near the end when he angrily whacked a court-side microphone.He had the last laugh.While Federer and Rafael Nadal are still swinging their rackets, he will behind them in the popularity stakes.Sheer bloody-mindedness, as well as outrageous talent, is the reason Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, aged almost 38, 33 and 32 respectively, remain out of reach for their pursuers and the reason they share 54 Grand Slam titles, including the last 11.But while Federer paints the court with strokes of magic and the swashbuckling Nadal plays tennis like a superhero, Djokovic is the master of attrition, winning by a thousand cuts.Although he is arguably the best returner the game has ever seen, is the best athlete and has an engaging personality, there is only so much love to go around.For now Djokovic will not care, and if anything will use a perceived lack of fanfare for his incredible feats as fuel to keep collecting Grand Slam titles and move past Federer and Nadal to the top of the all-time list.“Whether I’m going to be able to do it or not, I don’t know. I mean, I’m not really looking at age as a restriction of any kind for me at least,” Djokovic, the only man since Rod Laver to have held all four Grand Slams simultaneously, said on Sunday.“It just depends how long I’m going to play, whether I’m going to have a chance to make historic number one or slams.“It depends not only on myself, it depends on circumstances in life.”Had Federer converted one of the two match points that came his way at 8-7 in the fifth set he would have moved six Grand Slams clear of Djokovic.Instead it is four, and having won five of the last six on offer Djokovic appears to be in the middle of a period of domination that shows no sign of ending.He will go into the US Open as red-hot favourite to retain his title and when next year begins he will have his eyes fixed on winning an eighth Australian Open crown.Former coach Boris Becker says the race is now on and believes all three will add to their tallies.But time, perhaps, is on Djokovic’s side.“He’s a year younger than Nadal and five younger than Federer – we all know he fancies overtaking them,” Becker said. “Honestly, I think he can, but I wouldn’t say that for sure.”
Maybe when the fans start serenading Novak Djokovic in a Centre Court love-in it will be time for the Serb to call it a day.When he starts receiving the same adoration reserved almost exclusively for Roger Federer in Sunday’s epic Wimbledon final, maybe his resolve will soften, his hunger for the fight diminish, his love of “sticking it to them” fade.“Hopefully, in five years’ time I can be hearing the same chants,” the 32-year-old Serb said as he signed off his news conference following a five-set win over Federer which sealed a fifth Wimbledon title and 16th Grand Slam crown.Sunday’s triumph, in which he saved two match points and soaked up 94 winners off the Federer racket before clawing his way over the line in the longest Wimbledon singles final, confirmed Djokovic as the ultimate tennis anti-hero.Apart from those in his box, it seemed the entire crowd were rooting for Federer. They even booed him near the end when he angrily whacked a court-side microphone.He had the last laugh.While Federer and Rafael Nadal are still swinging their rackets, he will behind them in the popularity stakes.Sheer bloody-mindedness, as well as outrageous talent, is the reason Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, aged almost 38, 33 and 32 respectively, remain out of reach for their pursuers and the reason they share 54 Grand Slam titles, including the last 11.But while Federer paints the court with strokes of magic and the swashbuckling Nadal plays tennis like a superhero, Djokovic is the master of attrition, winning by a thousand cuts.Although he is arguably the best returner the game has ever seen, is the best athlete and has an engaging personality, there is only so much love to go around.For now Djokovic will not care, and if anything will use a perceived lack of fanfare for his incredible feats as fuel to keep collecting Grand Slam titles and move past Federer and Nadal to the top of the all-time list.“Whether I’m going to be able to do it or not, I don’t know. I mean, I’m not really looking at age as a restriction of any kind for me at least,” Djokovic, the only man since Rod Laver to have held all four Grand Slams simultaneously, said on Sunday.“It just depends how long I’m going to play, whether I’m going to have a chance to make historic number one or slams.“It depends not only on myself, it depends on circumstances in life.”Had Federer converted one of the two match points that came his way at 8-7 in the fifth set he would have moved six Grand Slams clear of Djokovic.Instead it is four, and having won five of the last six on offer Djokovic appears to be in the middle of a period of domination that shows no sign of ending.He will go into the US Open as red-hot favourite to retain his title and when next year begins he will have his eyes fixed on winning an eighth Australian Open crown.Former coach Boris Becker says the race is now on and believes all three will add to their tallies.But time, perhaps, is on Djokovic’s side.“He’s a year younger than Nadal and five younger than Federer – we all know he fancies overtaking them,” Becker said. “Honestly, I think he can, but I wouldn’t say that for sure.”
Wimbledon 2019: Novak Djokovic’s love of ‘sticking’ it to the crowds is fuelling his desire to be top dog
Maybe when the fans start serenading Novak Djokovic in a Centre Court love-in it will be time for the Serb to call it a day.When he starts receiving the same adoration reserved almost exclusively for Roger Federer in Sunday’s epic Wimbledon final, maybe his resolve will soften, his hunger for the fight diminish, his love of “sticking it to them” fade.“Hopefully, in five years’ time I can be hearing the same chants,” the 32-year-old Serb said as he signed off his news conference following a five-set win over Federer which sealed a fifth Wimbledon title and 16th Grand Slam crown.Sunday’s triumph, in which he saved two match points and soaked up 94 winners off the Federer racket before clawing his way over the line in the longest Wimbledon singles final, confirmed Djokovic as the ultimate tennis anti-hero.Apart from those in his box, it seemed the entire crowd were rooting for Federer. They even booed him near the end when he angrily whacked a court-side microphone.He had the last laugh.While Federer and Rafael Nadal are still swinging their rackets, he will behind them in the popularity stakes.Sheer bloody-mindedness, as well as outrageous talent, is the reason Federer, Nadal and Djokovic, aged almost 38, 33 and 32 respectively, remain out of reach for their pursuers and the reason they share 54 Grand Slam titles, including the last 11.But while Federer paints the court with strokes of magic and the swashbuckling Nadal plays tennis like a superhero, Djokovic is the master of attrition, winning by a thousand cuts.Although he is arguably the best returner the game has ever seen, is the best athlete and has an engaging personality, there is only so much love to go around.For now Djokovic will not care, and if anything will use a perceived lack of fanfare for his incredible feats as fuel to keep collecting Grand Slam titles and move past Federer and Nadal to the top of the all-time list.“Whether I’m going to be able to do it or not, I don’t know. I mean, I’m not really looking at age as a restriction of any kind for me at least,” Djokovic, the only man since Rod Laver to have held all four Grand Slams simultaneously, said on Sunday.“It just depends how long I’m going to play, whether I’m going to have a chance to make historic number one or slams.“It depends not only on myself, it depends on circumstances in life.”Had Federer converted one of the two match points that came his way at 8-7 in the fifth set he would have moved six Grand Slams clear of Djokovic.Instead it is four, and having won five of the last six on offer Djokovic appears to be in the middle of a period of domination that shows no sign of ending.He will go into the US Open as red-hot favourite to retain his title and when next year begins he will have his eyes fixed on winning an eighth Australian Open crown.Former coach Boris Becker says the race is now on and believes all three will add to their tallies.But time, perhaps, is on Djokovic’s side.“He’s a year younger than Nadal and five younger than Federer – we all know he fancies overtaking them,” Becker said. “Honestly, I think he can, but I wouldn’t say that for sure.”
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
Kate Middleton and Pippa Middleton Arrive at 2019 Wimbledon
Meghan Markle and Kate Middleton had a surprise guest join them at Wimbledon on Saturday morning: Kate's younger sister, Pippa.
WPA PoolShortly before Kate Middleton handed out the trophy for the men’s singles final on center court at Wimbledon yesterday, social media exploded as Meghan Markle hugged Beyoncé at the premiere to The Lion King in central London.“My princess!” Beyoncé said to Meghan as she embraced her warmly, while Jay-Z and Prince Harry exchanged amused glances from the sidelines.Beyoncé, looking beatifically into Meghan’s eyes said, “The baby is so beautiful. We love you guys.”Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, chats with Disney CEO Robert Iger as Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, embraces US singer-songwriter Beyoncé Niklas Halle’nHarry, not one to be caught short of small talk at such a critical moment, replied: “And how are the twins?”Beyoncé responded: “They are not here. They don’t come on every trip. We left them at home. They would loved to have been here.”Then, according to the Daily Mail’s royal reporter, Rebecca English, up piped Jay-Z, telling Harry: “The best advice I can give you, always find time for yourself.”As thunder-stealing moments go, Harry and Meghan’s was up there with the noisiest ones.Bizarrely, the appearance, as well as clashing with the final few minutes of the taught five set men’s final between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic, came just the day after Meghan and Kate had appeared side by side at the ladies single final, where Meghan’s pal Serena Williams was beaten by Simona Halep.Love All: The Kate, Meghan, and Pippa Show Wins WimbledonSaturday’s Wimbledon appearance was the result of painstaking negotiation between the two rival courts, and was clearly a coordinated attempt to reset perceptions of House of Sussex and House of Cambridge as rivals, and draw a line under persistent rumors of a feud between Meghan and Kate in particular. Just 24 hours later, as Kate prepared to make her way on to the grass to hand over the trophy while cameras flashed for Meghan and Harry a few miles away, that truce lay in tatters. Of course, we can’t be exactly sure how Kate reacted to being upstaged by Meghan and Harry Sunday night. There is a chance that Kate squealed with delight when she checked her phone in her car on the way home and saw footage of her brother-in-law and his wife glad-handing the world’s other biggest celebrity couple, but, somehow, it seems unlikely. Wimbledon is not only the highlight of the sporting British summer, it is Kate’s marquee engagement of the year. Tennis is one of the things Kate has always been genuinely passionate about, and she has fought hard to line herself up as the heir apparent to the Duke of Kent, who is currently the President of the Club.We can assume that this isn’t an engagement to which Kate would have given her unfettered and delighted blessing had she been consulted.And here lies the crux of the issue. Harry and Meghan are not just ‘not considering’ the schedule of Kate and William when planning their diary, they are actively disregarding it.There were plenty of good reasons for Meghan and Harry to lend their support to the launch of The Lion King, and to have made their way up a celebrity carpet that was yellow rather than red, patterned with paw prints, and studded with luminaries such as Elton John, Guy Ritchie, Vin Diesel, and Pharrell Williams.The London premiere, after all, was held in support of the conservation work undertaken by Harry and Meghan through The Royal Foundation, their joint charitable foundation with William and Kate that they are now disentangling themselves from.But to do so at 6pm on the evening of the Wimbledon final was a clear shot across the Cambridge’s bows.The dynamic is complicated enough at the moment, but it is fascinating to think this forward a few decades. Part of the reason for the big split between the Cambridges and the Sussexes is that Harry and Meghan did not want to be told what to do by William and Kate. Currently, Harry and Meghan’s court is answerable only to the queen, but when she dies, their staff will report to Charles. And when Charles dies, we can therefore assume, and the throne passes to William, Harry will be back where he started, having to run everything by his big brother once again.They can’t even make a sensible plan on how to divide up eyeballs on a busy summer weekend, so it’s not hard to see why so many people are beginning to have serious questions about how sustainable this rivalrous relationship between two courts is in the long term. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
Meghan Hugs Beyoncé, and Totally Steals Kate Middleton’s Wimbledon Thunder
WPA PoolShortly before Kate Middleton handed out the trophy for the men’s singles final on center court at Wimbledon yesterday, social media exploded as Meghan Markle hugged Beyoncé at the premiere to The Lion King in central London.“My princess!” Beyoncé said to Meghan as she embraced her warmly, while Jay-Z and Prince Harry exchanged amused glances from the sidelines.Beyoncé, looking beatifically into Meghan’s eyes said, “The baby is so beautiful. We love you guys.”Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, chats with Disney CEO Robert Iger as Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, embraces US singer-songwriter Beyoncé Niklas Halle’nHarry, not one to be caught short of small talk at such a critical moment, replied: “And how are the twins?”Beyoncé responded: “They are not here. They don’t come on every trip. We left them at home. They would loved to have been here.”Then, according to the Daily Mail’s royal reporter, Rebecca English, up piped Jay-Z, telling Harry: “The best advice I can give you, always find time for yourself.”As thunder-stealing moments go, Harry and Meghan’s was up there with the noisiest ones.Bizarrely, the appearance, as well as clashing with the final few minutes of the taught five set men’s final between Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic, came just the day after Meghan and Kate had appeared side by side at the ladies single final, where Meghan’s pal Serena Williams was beaten by Simona Halep.Love All: The Kate, Meghan, and Pippa Show Wins WimbledonSaturday’s Wimbledon appearance was the result of painstaking negotiation between the two rival courts, and was clearly a coordinated attempt to reset perceptions of House of Sussex and House of Cambridge as rivals, and draw a line under persistent rumors of a feud between Meghan and Kate in particular. Just 24 hours later, as Kate prepared to make her way on to the grass to hand over the trophy while cameras flashed for Meghan and Harry a few miles away, that truce lay in tatters. Of course, we can’t be exactly sure how Kate reacted to being upstaged by Meghan and Harry Sunday night. There is a chance that Kate squealed with delight when she checked her phone in her car on the way home and saw footage of her brother-in-law and his wife glad-handing the world’s other biggest celebrity couple, but, somehow, it seems unlikely. Wimbledon is not only the highlight of the sporting British summer, it is Kate’s marquee engagement of the year. Tennis is one of the things Kate has always been genuinely passionate about, and she has fought hard to line herself up as the heir apparent to the Duke of Kent, who is currently the President of the Club.We can assume that this isn’t an engagement to which Kate would have given her unfettered and delighted blessing had she been consulted.And here lies the crux of the issue. Harry and Meghan are not just ‘not considering’ the schedule of Kate and William when planning their diary, they are actively disregarding it.There were plenty of good reasons for Meghan and Harry to lend their support to the launch of The Lion King, and to have made their way up a celebrity carpet that was yellow rather than red, patterned with paw prints, and studded with luminaries such as Elton John, Guy Ritchie, Vin Diesel, and Pharrell Williams.The London premiere, after all, was held in support of the conservation work undertaken by Harry and Meghan through The Royal Foundation, their joint charitable foundation with William and Kate that they are now disentangling themselves from.But to do so at 6pm on the evening of the Wimbledon final was a clear shot across the Cambridge’s bows.The dynamic is complicated enough at the moment, but it is fascinating to think this forward a few decades. Part of the reason for the big split between the Cambridges and the Sussexes is that Harry and Meghan did not want to be told what to do by William and Kate. Currently, Harry and Meghan’s court is answerable only to the queen, but when she dies, their staff will report to Charles. And when Charles dies, we can therefore assume, and the throne passes to William, Harry will be back where he started, having to run everything by his big brother once again.They can’t even make a sensible plan on how to divide up eyeballs on a busy summer weekend, so it’s not hard to see why so many people are beginning to have serious questions about how sustainable this rivalrous relationship between two courts is in the long term. Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
The internet can't stop laughing at the Woody Harrelson Wimbledon meme after TV announcers kept cutting to his antics.
The Woody Harrelson Wimbledon Meme Is Officially the Most Amusing Way to Watch Tennis
The internet can't stop laughing at the Woody Harrelson Wimbledon meme after TV announcers kept cutting to his antics.
The mind boggles at the technology we are now using, which a few years ago we would very much have associated with science fiction and not reality. It is now part of everyday life and developing at such a speed that legislators and governments are struggling to keep up. We have just started using a Google Home device in the Umunna household. It’s a smart speaker similar to Amazon Alexa that answers your questions, gets the news, plays songs, and enables you to control other apps, (like Spotify), hands free, using your own voice. We weren’t really following yesterday’s Wimbledon men’s final so during the match I asked Google Home and it told me what the current score was.According to a report from this January, almost a quarter (21 per cent) of adults in the US now own a smart speaker with the figures rising, and here in the UK we seem to be following the same trend. At the very least, policymakers need to be consistent in their approach to the ever increasing tech usage – but this is not the case at present. One example is the US authorities. On the one hand, they seem keen to ensure that the enormous tech companies play by the rules and contribute to the common good. So at the end of last week the US Federal Trade Commission (which performs much the same functions as the UK’s Consumer and Markets Authority) reportedly approved a $5bn (£4bn) settlement with Facebook over allegations that the latter had inappropriately shared information belonging to 87 million users with the now defunct Cambridge Analytica political consulting firm.On the other hand, in a knee-jerk response coloured by economic nationalism, Donald Trump has threatened to hit French goods with extra tariffs in retaliation for the French government announcing last week the imposition of a 3 per cent levy on large, mostly US, digital companies’ local revenues. President Emmanuel Macron’s administration in Paris is of the view that the tech companies are paying little or no tax. The French tech tax will apply to tech companies with global sales of over €750m (£673m) which make more than €25m (£22m) in France.The advent of new technologies, the rise of automation, artificial intelligence and digitisation has brought many benefits, facilitating better and more efficient methods of communication, knowledge acquisition, working, shopping, spending our leisure time, travelling and generally organising our lives. It has the potential to revolutionise public services. But the advent of the new super-tech platforms in particular has concentrated power and wealth in the hands of a small number of people, new technologies are being used to facilitate abuse, crime and terrorism and to enable foreign powers to challenge our democratic processes and national security. One need only look at the increasing amount of police time and resources taken up with dealing with cybercrime and online fraud, to see the downsideVast quantities of our personal data is now held by others, not necessarily within our control, and public policy and legal frameworks are struggling to keep pace. We cannot stand idly by and not intervene in the public interest to address these problems.Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has talked about Labour’s answer to all of this being “socialism with an iPad”, meaning making Britain a leading power in technology. It’s a good soundbite but the ideological dogma of yesteryear can’t provide a comprehensive route map to the solutions to these very modern of issues.The old, left-right fulcrum, around which politics revolved in the 20th century, is not an appropriate prism through which to view these very 21st century challenges. We want our data privacy respected as a core property right – a right-wing proposition – but to get the best rewards from the data revolution we need universal access to data, public platforms, and high accountability and transparency – left-wing propositions. It follows that we shouldn’t pretend the answers will exclusively come from either ideological pre-disposition. So what should our approach be in ensuring these new technologies are used for the common good at home and abroad?Britain needs a sophisticated, multitrack approach. The first track must be about making the most of the opportunities these technologies present in the UK. That means using all the levers of government to encourage the take-up and adoption of them which will help massively increase UK productivity, necessary to facilitate higher wages. In addition, this will help ensure we create new jobs in this country to replace those displaced by automation and technological advance. Reindustrialising those areas which have been deindustrialised over time with these new industries must be a priority.The second track should focus on using the new technologies to improve public service delivery. They can help accelerate and optimise administrative processes and improve citizens’ experience of various services which can often be slow and inefficient. The efficiency gains will also save the Exchequer a lot of money which could be better used in other ways.The third track must be about setting the right limits on these new technologies. They carry risks which are increasingly a focus of public debate: invasion of privacy, bullying or monopolistic behaviour by digital giants, misuse of personal data, tax evasion by firms with “intangible” profits, reckless testing and commercialisation of new technologies like driverless cars and private drones, the harnessing of such technologies by security threats, like criminals and terrorists, and geopolitical challengers, like China, which is increasingly integrating its AI strategies with its foreign policy.The final track should address ownership and equality because too many of the rewards of these new technologies accrue to a relatively small number of individuals, exacerbating inequalities. New ownership structures must be developed to ensure greater distribution of the benefits – both to workers and wider society.Our goal must be a constantly evolving body of democratised and repurposed regulation that tracks the realities of new technologies as they emerge and are applied, and starts from the principle that citizens, not governments or firms, should have the most power. President Macron gets this. It is quite clear that Trump with his narrow nationalism does not. If the big tech companies are all made to pay their fair share and abide by the rules, all peoples and their governments – including Trump’s – will benefit. Chuka Umunna is the Liberal Democrat MP for Streatham
I love new technology, but we need governments to start regulating it properly – for all our sakes
The mind boggles at the technology we are now using, which a few years ago we would very much have associated with science fiction and not reality. It is now part of everyday life and developing at such a speed that legislators and governments are struggling to keep up. We have just started using a Google Home device in the Umunna household. It’s a smart speaker similar to Amazon Alexa that answers your questions, gets the news, plays songs, and enables you to control other apps, (like Spotify), hands free, using your own voice. We weren’t really following yesterday’s Wimbledon men’s final so during the match I asked Google Home and it told me what the current score was.According to a report from this January, almost a quarter (21 per cent) of adults in the US now own a smart speaker with the figures rising, and here in the UK we seem to be following the same trend. At the very least, policymakers need to be consistent in their approach to the ever increasing tech usage – but this is not the case at present. One example is the US authorities. On the one hand, they seem keen to ensure that the enormous tech companies play by the rules and contribute to the common good. So at the end of last week the US Federal Trade Commission (which performs much the same functions as the UK’s Consumer and Markets Authority) reportedly approved a $5bn (£4bn) settlement with Facebook over allegations that the latter had inappropriately shared information belonging to 87 million users with the now defunct Cambridge Analytica political consulting firm.On the other hand, in a knee-jerk response coloured by economic nationalism, Donald Trump has threatened to hit French goods with extra tariffs in retaliation for the French government announcing last week the imposition of a 3 per cent levy on large, mostly US, digital companies’ local revenues. President Emmanuel Macron’s administration in Paris is of the view that the tech companies are paying little or no tax. The French tech tax will apply to tech companies with global sales of over €750m (£673m) which make more than €25m (£22m) in France.The advent of new technologies, the rise of automation, artificial intelligence and digitisation has brought many benefits, facilitating better and more efficient methods of communication, knowledge acquisition, working, shopping, spending our leisure time, travelling and generally organising our lives. It has the potential to revolutionise public services. But the advent of the new super-tech platforms in particular has concentrated power and wealth in the hands of a small number of people, new technologies are being used to facilitate abuse, crime and terrorism and to enable foreign powers to challenge our democratic processes and national security. One need only look at the increasing amount of police time and resources taken up with dealing with cybercrime and online fraud, to see the downsideVast quantities of our personal data is now held by others, not necessarily within our control, and public policy and legal frameworks are struggling to keep pace. We cannot stand idly by and not intervene in the public interest to address these problems.Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has talked about Labour’s answer to all of this being “socialism with an iPad”, meaning making Britain a leading power in technology. It’s a good soundbite but the ideological dogma of yesteryear can’t provide a comprehensive route map to the solutions to these very modern of issues.The old, left-right fulcrum, around which politics revolved in the 20th century, is not an appropriate prism through which to view these very 21st century challenges. We want our data privacy respected as a core property right – a right-wing proposition – but to get the best rewards from the data revolution we need universal access to data, public platforms, and high accountability and transparency – left-wing propositions. It follows that we shouldn’t pretend the answers will exclusively come from either ideological pre-disposition. So what should our approach be in ensuring these new technologies are used for the common good at home and abroad?Britain needs a sophisticated, multitrack approach. The first track must be about making the most of the opportunities these technologies present in the UK. That means using all the levers of government to encourage the take-up and adoption of them which will help massively increase UK productivity, necessary to facilitate higher wages. In addition, this will help ensure we create new jobs in this country to replace those displaced by automation and technological advance. Reindustrialising those areas which have been deindustrialised over time with these new industries must be a priority.The second track should focus on using the new technologies to improve public service delivery. They can help accelerate and optimise administrative processes and improve citizens’ experience of various services which can often be slow and inefficient. The efficiency gains will also save the Exchequer a lot of money which could be better used in other ways.The third track must be about setting the right limits on these new technologies. They carry risks which are increasingly a focus of public debate: invasion of privacy, bullying or monopolistic behaviour by digital giants, misuse of personal data, tax evasion by firms with “intangible” profits, reckless testing and commercialisation of new technologies like driverless cars and private drones, the harnessing of such technologies by security threats, like criminals and terrorists, and geopolitical challengers, like China, which is increasingly integrating its AI strategies with its foreign policy.The final track should address ownership and equality because too many of the rewards of these new technologies accrue to a relatively small number of individuals, exacerbating inequalities. New ownership structures must be developed to ensure greater distribution of the benefits – both to workers and wider society.Our goal must be a constantly evolving body of democratised and repurposed regulation that tracks the realities of new technologies as they emerge and are applied, and starts from the principle that citizens, not governments or firms, should have the most power. President Macron gets this. It is quite clear that Trump with his narrow nationalism does not. If the big tech companies are all made to pay their fair share and abide by the rules, all peoples and their governments – including Trump’s – will benefit. Chuka Umunna is the Liberal Democrat MP for Streatham
The mind boggles at the technology we are now using, which a few years ago we would very much have associated with science fiction and not reality. It is now part of everyday life and developing at such a speed that legislators and governments are struggling to keep up. We have just started using a Google Home device in the Umunna household. It’s a smart speaker similar to Amazon Alexa that answers your questions, gets the news, plays songs, and enables you to control other apps, (like Spotify), hands free, using your own voice. We weren’t really following yesterday’s Wimbledon men’s final so during the match I asked Google Home and it told me what the current score was.According to a report from this January, almost a quarter (21 per cent) of adults in the US now own a smart speaker with the figures rising, and here in the UK we seem to be following the same trend. At the very least, policymakers need to be consistent in their approach to the ever increasing tech usage – but this is not the case at present. One example is the US authorities. On the one hand, they seem keen to ensure that the enormous tech companies play by the rules and contribute to the common good. So at the end of last week the US Federal Trade Commission (which performs much the same functions as the UK’s Consumer and Markets Authority) reportedly approved a $5bn (£4bn) settlement with Facebook over allegations that the latter had inappropriately shared information belonging to 87 million users with the now defunct Cambridge Analytica political consulting firm.On the other hand, in a knee-jerk response coloured by economic nationalism, Donald Trump has threatened to hit French goods with extra tariffs in retaliation for the French government announcing last week the imposition of a 3 per cent levy on large, mostly US, digital companies’ local revenues. President Emmanuel Macron’s administration in Paris is of the view that the tech companies are paying little or no tax. The French tech tax will apply to tech companies with global sales of over €750m (£673m) which make more than €25m (£22m) in France.The advent of new technologies, the rise of automation, artificial intelligence and digitisation has brought many benefits, facilitating better and more efficient methods of communication, knowledge acquisition, working, shopping, spending our leisure time, travelling and generally organising our lives. It has the potential to revolutionise public services. But the advent of the new super-tech platforms in particular has concentrated power and wealth in the hands of a small number of people, new technologies are being used to facilitate abuse, crime and terrorism and to enable foreign powers to challenge our democratic processes and national security. One need only look at the increasing amount of police time and resources taken up with dealing with cybercrime and online fraud, to see the downsideVast quantities of our personal data is now held by others, not necessarily within our control, and public policy and legal frameworks are struggling to keep pace. We cannot stand idly by and not intervene in the public interest to address these problems.Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has talked about Labour’s answer to all of this being “socialism with an iPad”, meaning making Britain a leading power in technology. It’s a good soundbite but the ideological dogma of yesteryear can’t provide a comprehensive route map to the solutions to these very modern of issues.The old, left-right fulcrum, around which politics revolved in the 20th century, is not an appropriate prism through which to view these very 21st century challenges. We want our data privacy respected as a core property right – a right-wing proposition – but to get the best rewards from the data revolution we need universal access to data, public platforms, and high accountability and transparency – left-wing propositions. It follows that we shouldn’t pretend the answers will exclusively come from either ideological pre-disposition. So what should our approach be in ensuring these new technologies are used for the common good at home and abroad?Britain needs a sophisticated, multitrack approach. The first track must be about making the most of the opportunities these technologies present in the UK. That means using all the levers of government to encourage the take-up and adoption of them which will help massively increase UK productivity, necessary to facilitate higher wages. In addition, this will help ensure we create new jobs in this country to replace those displaced by automation and technological advance. Reindustrialising those areas which have been deindustrialised over time with these new industries must be a priority.The second track should focus on using the new technologies to improve public service delivery. They can help accelerate and optimise administrative processes and improve citizens’ experience of various services which can often be slow and inefficient. The efficiency gains will also save the Exchequer a lot of money which could be better used in other ways.The third track must be about setting the right limits on these new technologies. They carry risks which are increasingly a focus of public debate: invasion of privacy, bullying or monopolistic behaviour by digital giants, misuse of personal data, tax evasion by firms with “intangible” profits, reckless testing and commercialisation of new technologies like driverless cars and private drones, the harnessing of such technologies by security threats, like criminals and terrorists, and geopolitical challengers, like China, which is increasingly integrating its AI strategies with its foreign policy.The final track should address ownership and equality because too many of the rewards of these new technologies accrue to a relatively small number of individuals, exacerbating inequalities. New ownership structures must be developed to ensure greater distribution of the benefits – both to workers and wider society.Our goal must be a constantly evolving body of democratised and repurposed regulation that tracks the realities of new technologies as they emerge and are applied, and starts from the principle that citizens, not governments or firms, should have the most power. President Macron gets this. It is quite clear that Trump with his narrow nationalism does not. If the big tech companies are all made to pay their fair share and abide by the rules, all peoples and their governments – including Trump’s – will benefit. Chuka Umunna is the Liberal Democrat MP for Streatham
I love new technology, but we need governments to start regulating it properly – for all our sakes
The mind boggles at the technology we are now using, which a few years ago we would very much have associated with science fiction and not reality. It is now part of everyday life and developing at such a speed that legislators and governments are struggling to keep up. We have just started using a Google Home device in the Umunna household. It’s a smart speaker similar to Amazon Alexa that answers your questions, gets the news, plays songs, and enables you to control other apps, (like Spotify), hands free, using your own voice. We weren’t really following yesterday’s Wimbledon men’s final so during the match I asked Google Home and it told me what the current score was.According to a report from this January, almost a quarter (21 per cent) of adults in the US now own a smart speaker with the figures rising, and here in the UK we seem to be following the same trend. At the very least, policymakers need to be consistent in their approach to the ever increasing tech usage – but this is not the case at present. One example is the US authorities. On the one hand, they seem keen to ensure that the enormous tech companies play by the rules and contribute to the common good. So at the end of last week the US Federal Trade Commission (which performs much the same functions as the UK’s Consumer and Markets Authority) reportedly approved a $5bn (£4bn) settlement with Facebook over allegations that the latter had inappropriately shared information belonging to 87 million users with the now defunct Cambridge Analytica political consulting firm.On the other hand, in a knee-jerk response coloured by economic nationalism, Donald Trump has threatened to hit French goods with extra tariffs in retaliation for the French government announcing last week the imposition of a 3 per cent levy on large, mostly US, digital companies’ local revenues. President Emmanuel Macron’s administration in Paris is of the view that the tech companies are paying little or no tax. The French tech tax will apply to tech companies with global sales of over €750m (£673m) which make more than €25m (£22m) in France.The advent of new technologies, the rise of automation, artificial intelligence and digitisation has brought many benefits, facilitating better and more efficient methods of communication, knowledge acquisition, working, shopping, spending our leisure time, travelling and generally organising our lives. It has the potential to revolutionise public services. But the advent of the new super-tech platforms in particular has concentrated power and wealth in the hands of a small number of people, new technologies are being used to facilitate abuse, crime and terrorism and to enable foreign powers to challenge our democratic processes and national security. One need only look at the increasing amount of police time and resources taken up with dealing with cybercrime and online fraud, to see the downsideVast quantities of our personal data is now held by others, not necessarily within our control, and public policy and legal frameworks are struggling to keep pace. We cannot stand idly by and not intervene in the public interest to address these problems.Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell has talked about Labour’s answer to all of this being “socialism with an iPad”, meaning making Britain a leading power in technology. It’s a good soundbite but the ideological dogma of yesteryear can’t provide a comprehensive route map to the solutions to these very modern of issues.The old, left-right fulcrum, around which politics revolved in the 20th century, is not an appropriate prism through which to view these very 21st century challenges. We want our data privacy respected as a core property right – a right-wing proposition – but to get the best rewards from the data revolution we need universal access to data, public platforms, and high accountability and transparency – left-wing propositions. It follows that we shouldn’t pretend the answers will exclusively come from either ideological pre-disposition. So what should our approach be in ensuring these new technologies are used for the common good at home and abroad?Britain needs a sophisticated, multitrack approach. The first track must be about making the most of the opportunities these technologies present in the UK. That means using all the levers of government to encourage the take-up and adoption of them which will help massively increase UK productivity, necessary to facilitate higher wages. In addition, this will help ensure we create new jobs in this country to replace those displaced by automation and technological advance. Reindustrialising those areas which have been deindustrialised over time with these new industries must be a priority.The second track should focus on using the new technologies to improve public service delivery. They can help accelerate and optimise administrative processes and improve citizens’ experience of various services which can often be slow and inefficient. The efficiency gains will also save the Exchequer a lot of money which could be better used in other ways.The third track must be about setting the right limits on these new technologies. They carry risks which are increasingly a focus of public debate: invasion of privacy, bullying or monopolistic behaviour by digital giants, misuse of personal data, tax evasion by firms with “intangible” profits, reckless testing and commercialisation of new technologies like driverless cars and private drones, the harnessing of such technologies by security threats, like criminals and terrorists, and geopolitical challengers, like China, which is increasingly integrating its AI strategies with its foreign policy.The final track should address ownership and equality because too many of the rewards of these new technologies accrue to a relatively small number of individuals, exacerbating inequalities. New ownership structures must be developed to ensure greater distribution of the benefits – both to workers and wider society.Our goal must be a constantly evolving body of democratised and repurposed regulation that tracks the realities of new technologies as they emerge and are applied, and starts from the principle that citizens, not governments or firms, should have the most power. President Macron gets this. It is quite clear that Trump with his narrow nationalism does not. If the big tech companies are all made to pay their fair share and abide by the rules, all peoples and their governments – including Trump’s – will benefit. Chuka Umunna is the Liberal Democrat MP for Streatham
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
Djokovic reveals ‘silly’ mental trick to help him deal with crowd at Wimbledon
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
Djokovic reveals ‘silly’ mental trick to help him deal with crowd at Wimbledon
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
Djokovic reveals ‘silly’ mental trick to help him deal with crowd at Wimbledon
Serbia's Novak Djokovic reveals his ‘silly’ trick that helped him deal with pro-Federer crowd at Wimbledon
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Wimbledon Tennis Ball Boys and Girls
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Romania's Simona Halep hugs United States' Serena Williams after defeating her in the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Romania's Simona Halep hugs United States' Serena Williams after defeating her in the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
Romania's Simona Halep hugs United States' Serena Williams after defeating her in the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Romania's Simona Halep hugs United States' Serena Williams after defeating her in the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Laurence Griffiths/Pool Photo via AP)
Romania's Simona Halep poses with the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)
APTOPIX Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Romania's Simona Halep poses with the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Wimbledon Tennis Ball Boys and Girls
United States' Cori "Coco" Gauff speaks to The Associated Press during the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Tuesday, July 9, 2019. A day after her memorable Wimbledon ended, Coco Gauff already was thinking about coming back. "Obviously, there's always room for improvement," Gauff said in an interview with The Associated Press at the All England Club on Tuesday.(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)
Romania's Simona Halep poses with the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)
APTOPIX Britain Wimbledon Tennis
Romania's Simona Halep poses with the trophy after defeating United States' Serena Williams during the women's singles final match on day twelve of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships in London, Saturday, July 13, 2019.(Toby Melville/Pool Photo via AP)
Djokovic lifted the Wimbledon trophy for the fifth time after an epic defeat of Roger Federer - AFP
Tennis Podcast, Wimbledon 2019: Will Novak Djokovic win the Grand Slam race?
Djokovic lifted the Wimbledon trophy for the fifth time after an epic defeat of Roger Federer - AFP
Djokovic lifted the Wimbledon trophy for the fifth time after an epic defeat of Roger Federer - AFP
Tennis Podcast, Wimbledon 2019: Will Novak Djokovic win the Grand Slam race?
Djokovic lifted the Wimbledon trophy for the fifth time after an epic defeat of Roger Federer - AFP
A combined peak audience of 8.3 million saw England’s dramatic World Cup final win play out on television, but despite the interest in the cricket, the BBC was able to boast the best sporting viewing figures of the weekend, with a peak audience of 9.6m tuning in to watch the men’s final at Wimbledon between winner Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer.Free-to-air viewers were able to watch England’s cricketers live for the first time since the 2005 Ashes series after Sky Sports agreed for Channel 4 to also show the Lord’s clash with New Zealand.The decision – widely celebrated – was vindicated with Channel 4 saying on Monday that the audience peaked at 8.3m, with 4.8m of those watching on the terrestrial channel. “I’m thrilled that a total peak audience of 8.3m watched England win the Cricket World Cup final on Channel 4 and Sky,” said Channel 4’s chief executive Alex Mahon.Channel 4 also shared live coverage of the British Grand Prix, won by home favourite Lewis Hamilton, which 3.7m viewers saw across the two networks.“It’s wonderful that the whole nation can come together to share these momentous British sporting events thanks to a fantastic partnership between Channel 4 and Sky,” Mahon added.Sky was also celebrating the figures, with UK and Ireland chief executive Stephen Van Rooyen saying: “Congratulations to England and everyone who has been part of the journey at the ECB. The ICC put on a terrific tournament.“We’ve been proud host broadcasters of a home Cricket World Cup, dedicating a channel and showing every single minute, which has been absorbing from the first ball to the unforgettable final delivery.“Sunday saw a peak across Sky and Channel 4 of 8.3 million – a huge audience for a huge moment for British sport. On Sky’s channels our peak was 3.5m alone, a fitting way to cap a terrific tournament.“We are proud of our long-term cricket partnership, which has grown over three decades, delivering record investment into the sport. This partnership will continue with our coverage of the men’s and women’s Ashes this summer, and by working with the ECB to deliver a new grassroots cricket participation campaign.”The 2005 Ashes series, arguably the most gripping Test series ever witnessed, was shown on Channel 4 and, despite its popularity, was the last international cricket to be shown on free-to-air in the UK.Critics have said being behind a paywall has cost the English game but, while acknowledging the joy of having the game broadcast into more homes than usual, Ashley Giles, the director of cricket for the England men’s team, said Sky’s role should not be overlooked.Giles, who played in that 2005 series, said on Radio 4: “First of all, we have got cricket back on terrestrial next year – our new competition, The Hundred. It’s going to be magnificent and the BBC are showing that.“But make no mistake, the investment Sky has put into the game has helped us get to the point where we were at yesterday.”Asked if England would not have been able to win the World Cup without Sky’s financial backing, Giles said: “Quite possibly, yes. The investment in the game from grassroots to professional has allowed us to do what we’ve done.“Sky took the game on and have been fantastic supporters since. Thank you to them for allowing it on Channel 4.”PA
Wimbledon beats Cricket World Cup final in battle over TV viewing figures between BBC, Channel 4 and Sky
A combined peak audience of 8.3 million saw England’s dramatic World Cup final win play out on television, but despite the interest in the cricket, the BBC was able to boast the best sporting viewing figures of the weekend, with a peak audience of 9.6m tuning in to watch the men’s final at Wimbledon between winner Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer.Free-to-air viewers were able to watch England’s cricketers live for the first time since the 2005 Ashes series after Sky Sports agreed for Channel 4 to also show the Lord’s clash with New Zealand.The decision – widely celebrated – was vindicated with Channel 4 saying on Monday that the audience peaked at 8.3m, with 4.8m of those watching on the terrestrial channel. “I’m thrilled that a total peak audience of 8.3m watched England win the Cricket World Cup final on Channel 4 and Sky,” said Channel 4’s chief executive Alex Mahon.Channel 4 also shared live coverage of the British Grand Prix, won by home favourite Lewis Hamilton, which 3.7m viewers saw across the two networks.“It’s wonderful that the whole nation can come together to share these momentous British sporting events thanks to a fantastic partnership between Channel 4 and Sky,” Mahon added.Sky was also celebrating the figures, with UK and Ireland chief executive Stephen Van Rooyen saying: “Congratulations to England and everyone who has been part of the journey at the ECB. The ICC put on a terrific tournament.“We’ve been proud host broadcasters of a home Cricket World Cup, dedicating a channel and showing every single minute, which has been absorbing from the first ball to the unforgettable final delivery.“Sunday saw a peak across Sky and Channel 4 of 8.3 million – a huge audience for a huge moment for British sport. On Sky’s channels our peak was 3.5m alone, a fitting way to cap a terrific tournament.“We are proud of our long-term cricket partnership, which has grown over three decades, delivering record investment into the sport. This partnership will continue with our coverage of the men’s and women’s Ashes this summer, and by working with the ECB to deliver a new grassroots cricket participation campaign.”The 2005 Ashes series, arguably the most gripping Test series ever witnessed, was shown on Channel 4 and, despite its popularity, was the last international cricket to be shown on free-to-air in the UK.Critics have said being behind a paywall has cost the English game but, while acknowledging the joy of having the game broadcast into more homes than usual, Ashley Giles, the director of cricket for the England men’s team, said Sky’s role should not be overlooked.Giles, who played in that 2005 series, said on Radio 4: “First of all, we have got cricket back on terrestrial next year – our new competition, The Hundred. It’s going to be magnificent and the BBC are showing that.“But make no mistake, the investment Sky has put into the game has helped us get to the point where we were at yesterday.”Asked if England would not have been able to win the World Cup without Sky’s financial backing, Giles said: “Quite possibly, yes. The investment in the game from grassroots to professional has allowed us to do what we’ve done.“Sky took the game on and have been fantastic supporters since. Thank you to them for allowing it on Channel 4.”PA
A combined peak audience of 8.3 million saw England’s dramatic World Cup final win play out on television, but despite the interest in the cricket, the BBC was able to boast the best sporting viewing figures of the weekend, with a peak audience of 9.6m tuning in to watch the men’s final at Wimbledon between winner Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer.Free-to-air viewers were able to watch England’s cricketers live for the first time since the 2005 Ashes series after Sky Sports agreed for Channel 4 to also show the Lord’s clash with New Zealand.The decision – widely celebrated – was vindicated with Channel 4 saying on Monday that the audience peaked at 8.3m, with 4.8m of those watching on the terrestrial channel. “I’m thrilled that a total peak audience of 8.3m watched England win the Cricket World Cup final on Channel 4 and Sky,” said Channel 4’s chief executive Alex Mahon.Channel 4 also shared live coverage of the British Grand Prix, won by home favourite Lewis Hamilton, which 3.7m viewers saw across the two networks.“It’s wonderful that the whole nation can come together to share these momentous British sporting events thanks to a fantastic partnership between Channel 4 and Sky,” Mahon added.Sky was also celebrating the figures, with UK and Ireland chief executive Stephen Van Rooyen saying: “Congratulations to England and everyone who has been part of the journey at the ECB. The ICC put on a terrific tournament.“We’ve been proud host broadcasters of a home Cricket World Cup, dedicating a channel and showing every single minute, which has been absorbing from the first ball to the unforgettable final delivery.“Sunday saw a peak across Sky and Channel 4 of 8.3 million – a huge audience for a huge moment for British sport. On Sky’s channels our peak was 3.5m alone, a fitting way to cap a terrific tournament.“We are proud of our long-term cricket partnership, which has grown over three decades, delivering record investment into the sport. This partnership will continue with our coverage of the men’s and women’s Ashes this summer, and by working with the ECB to deliver a new grassroots cricket participation campaign.”The 2005 Ashes series, arguably the most gripping Test series ever witnessed, was shown on Channel 4 and, despite its popularity, was the last international cricket to be shown on free-to-air in the UK.Critics have said being behind a paywall has cost the English game but, while acknowledging the joy of having the game broadcast into more homes than usual, Ashley Giles, the director of cricket for the England men’s team, said Sky’s role should not be overlooked.Giles, who played in that 2005 series, said on Radio 4: “First of all, we have got cricket back on terrestrial next year – our new competition, The Hundred. It’s going to be magnificent and the BBC are showing that.“But make no mistake, the investment Sky has put into the game has helped us get to the point where we were at yesterday.”Asked if England would not have been able to win the World Cup without Sky’s financial backing, Giles said: “Quite possibly, yes. The investment in the game from grassroots to professional has allowed us to do what we’ve done.“Sky took the game on and have been fantastic supporters since. Thank you to them for allowing it on Channel 4.”PA
Wimbledon beats Cricket World Cup final in battle over TV viewing figures between BBC, Channel 4 and Sky
A combined peak audience of 8.3 million saw England’s dramatic World Cup final win play out on television, but despite the interest in the cricket, the BBC was able to boast the best sporting viewing figures of the weekend, with a peak audience of 9.6m tuning in to watch the men’s final at Wimbledon between winner Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer.Free-to-air viewers were able to watch England’s cricketers live for the first time since the 2005 Ashes series after Sky Sports agreed for Channel 4 to also show the Lord’s clash with New Zealand.The decision – widely celebrated – was vindicated with Channel 4 saying on Monday that the audience peaked at 8.3m, with 4.8m of those watching on the terrestrial channel. “I’m thrilled that a total peak audience of 8.3m watched England win the Cricket World Cup final on Channel 4 and Sky,” said Channel 4’s chief executive Alex Mahon.Channel 4 also shared live coverage of the British Grand Prix, won by home favourite Lewis Hamilton, which 3.7m viewers saw across the two networks.“It’s wonderful that the whole nation can come together to share these momentous British sporting events thanks to a fantastic partnership between Channel 4 and Sky,” Mahon added.Sky was also celebrating the figures, with UK and Ireland chief executive Stephen Van Rooyen saying: “Congratulations to England and everyone who has been part of the journey at the ECB. The ICC put on a terrific tournament.“We’ve been proud host broadcasters of a home Cricket World Cup, dedicating a channel and showing every single minute, which has been absorbing from the first ball to the unforgettable final delivery.“Sunday saw a peak across Sky and Channel 4 of 8.3 million – a huge audience for a huge moment for British sport. On Sky’s channels our peak was 3.5m alone, a fitting way to cap a terrific tournament.“We are proud of our long-term cricket partnership, which has grown over three decades, delivering record investment into the sport. This partnership will continue with our coverage of the men’s and women’s Ashes this summer, and by working with the ECB to deliver a new grassroots cricket participation campaign.”The 2005 Ashes series, arguably the most gripping Test series ever witnessed, was shown on Channel 4 and, despite its popularity, was the last international cricket to be shown on free-to-air in the UK.Critics have said being behind a paywall has cost the English game but, while acknowledging the joy of having the game broadcast into more homes than usual, Ashley Giles, the director of cricket for the England men’s team, said Sky’s role should not be overlooked.Giles, who played in that 2005 series, said on Radio 4: “First of all, we have got cricket back on terrestrial next year – our new competition, The Hundred. It’s going to be magnificent and the BBC are showing that.“But make no mistake, the investment Sky has put into the game has helped us get to the point where we were at yesterday.”Asked if England would not have been able to win the World Cup without Sky’s financial backing, Giles said: “Quite possibly, yes. The investment in the game from grassroots to professional has allowed us to do what we’ve done.“Sky took the game on and have been fantastic supporters since. Thank you to them for allowing it on Channel 4.”PA
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
Woody Harrelson becomes Wimbledon meme
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
Woody Harrelson becomes Wimbledon meme
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
Woody Harrelson becomes Wimbledon meme
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.
Woody Harrelson becomes Wimbledon meme
A Twitter thread of the actor's greatest moments while watching the epic Men's Doubles Final has gone viral, with nearly 4 million views.

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