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Saints QB Brees: No plans to field offers from other teams

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) throws against the Minnesota Vikings during the first half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Saints QB Brees: No plans to field offers from other teams

New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) walks off the field after a 29-24 loss to the Minnesota Vikings in an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Jags 'threw a tantrum' when Marrone started making changes

Jacksonville Jaguars quarterback Blake Bortles talks with reporters following a win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

Jags 'threw a tantrum' when Marrone started making changes

Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette (27) celebrates as he walks off the field following a 45-42 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

Jags 'threw a tantrum' when Marrone started making changes

Jacksonville Jaguars head coach Doug Marrone talks with reporters following a win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

Jags 'threw a tantrum' when Marrone started making changes

Jacksonville Jaguars kicker Josh Lambo (4) celebrates with Calais Campbell (93) after kicking a field goal during the second half of an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game against the Pittsburgh Steelers in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Jaguars won 45-42. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Trial set to begin in ex-NFL player's road-rage killing

FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2012 file photo, New York Jets running back Joe McKnight (25) during the fourth quarter of an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams in St. Louis. The trial in a road-rage shooting that left McKnight dead was set to begin with jury selection Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, in a New Orleans suburb. McKnight was shot to death by Ronald Gasser in the December 16 shooting. (AP Photo/Tom Gannam, File)

Trial set to begin in ex-NFL player's road-rage killing

FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2016 file photo, a woman comforts an unidentified mourner as he cries into a scarf with University of Southern California colors before funeral services for former NFL football player Joe McKnight at the New Home Family Worship Center in New Orleans. The trial in a road-rage shooting that left McKnight dead was set to begin with jury selection Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, in a New Orleans suburb. McKnight was shot to death by Ronald Gasser in the December 16 shooting. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

Earnhardt Jr. to help NBC Sports at Super Bowl and Olympics

FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2012, file photo, Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder, left, walks with NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr., on the field before an NFL preseason football game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, in Landover, Md. Earnhardt has never attended a Super Bowl, but is a rabid Redskins fan. Earnhardt will be part of the network's pregame show before the Super Bowl, then head to South Korea for NBC Sports' coverage of next month's Olympics. (AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Case Keenum, left, celebrates after a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints during the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings head coach Mike Zimmer greets wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) during a press conference following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) celebrates with offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints in an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings owner Zygi Wilf, left, celebrates with wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints in an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings head coach Mike Zimmer waves as fans looked into his post-game press conference following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) runs in for a game winning touchdown against the New Orleans Saints during the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

FILE - In this Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, file photo, Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) celebrates in the end zone after a making the game-winning touchdown against the New Orleans Saints late the second half of an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis,. The Vikings defeated the Saints 29-24. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)

Vikings pivot to Eagles, after big break to beat Saints

Minnesota Vikings quarterback Case Keenum (7) celebrates following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints in an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

Tennessee Titans general manager Jon Robinson answers questions during an NFL football news conference Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The Titans split with head coach Mike Mularkey on Monday after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. The Titans announced the move two days after a 35-14 loss to New England in the AFC divisional round. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, file photo, Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Mularkey, right, listens to an official during the first half of an NFL divisional playoff football game against the New England Patriots in Foxborough, Mass. The Titans split with Mularkey on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, file)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Mularkey speaks to down judge Jerod Phillips on the sideline during the first half of an NFL divisional playoff football game against the New England Patriots, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018, file photo, Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Mularkey looks at the scoreboard during the first half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game against Kansas City Chiefs, in Kansas City, Mo. The Titans split with Mularkey on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

Tennessee Titans general manager Jon Robinson listens to a question during an NFL football news conference Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The Titans split with head coach Mike Mularkey on Monday after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. The Titans announced the move two days after a 35-14 loss to New England in the AFC divisional round. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

Tennessee Titans general manager Jon Robinson answers questions during an NFL football news conference Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. The Titans split with head coach Mike Mularkey on Monday after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. The Titans announced the move two days after a 35-14 loss to New England in the AFC divisional round. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Titans fire coach Mike Mularkey after playoff win

FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2018, file photo, Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Mularkey watches before an NFL wild-card playoff football game against Kansas City Chiefs, in Kansas City, Mo. The Titans split with Mularkey on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, after he revived a team with the NFL's worst record over two seasons and led them to their first playoff victory in 14 years. (AP Photo/Ed Zurga, File)

AP source: Colts closing in on deal to hire McDaniels

FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2018, file photo, New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels watches from the sideline during the second half of an NFL divisional playoff football game against the Tennessee Titans in Foxborough, Mass. A person familiar with the negotiations says the Indianapolis Colts are close to reaching a deal to hire McDaniels as their new coach. The person spoke to The Associated Press on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because they were still working on the contract. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

AP source: Colts closing in on deal to hire McDaniels

FILE - In this Dec. 31, 2017, file photo, New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels watches from the sideline during the first half of the team's NFL football game against the New York Jets in Foxborough, Mass. The New York Giants had the busiest day in their search for a new head coach, interviewing Patriots coordinators McDaniels and Matt Patricia. McDaniels met with new general manager Dave Gettleman, Giants co-owner John Mara and assistant general manager Kevin Abrams on Friday afternoon, Jan. 5, in Foxborough. Patricia, the defensive coordinator, talked with the trio in the morning. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

Jaguars' Jalen Ramsey tells fans 'we're going to Super Bowl'

Jacksonville Jaguars defensive tackle Malik Jackson (97) celebrates as he leaves the field after a 45-42 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Jaguars' Jalen Ramsey tells fans 'we're going to Super Bowl'

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown (84) is tackled after making a catch by Jacksonville Jaguars cornerback Jalen Ramsey (20) during the first half of an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

Jaguars' Jalen Ramsey tells fans 'we're going to Super Bowl'

Jacksonville Jaguars outside linebacker Telvin Smith (50) celebrates with fans after a win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Don Wright)

Patriots won't bite on Ramsey's trash talk

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski catches a touchdown pass with Tennessee Titans safety Kevin Byard (31) defending during the second half of an NFL divisional playoff football game, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Patriots won't bite on Ramsey's trash talk

New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski (87) catches a pass in front of Tennessee Titans linebacker Wesley Woodyard (59) during the second half of an NFL divisional playoff football game, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Patriots won't bite on Ramsey's trash talk

New England Patriots wide receiver Danny Amendola (80) catches a pass in front of Tennessee Titans cornerback Logan Ryan (26) during the second half of an NFL divisional playoff football game, Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, in Foxborough, Mass. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer)

Humbled Steelers face questions heading into offseason

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (7) stands on the sideline during the second half of an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game against the Jacksonville Jaguars in Pittsburgh, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Humbled Steelers face questions heading into offseason

Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger takes questions during the news confrence after an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, in Pittsburgh. The Steelers lost 45-42 and the Jaguars advance to the AFC championship. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Humbled Steelers face questions heading into offseason

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin takes questions during the news confrence after an NFL football game against the Jacksonville Jaguars, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, in Pittsburgh. The Steelers lost 45-42 and the Jaguars advance to the AFC championship. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

Novak Djokovic shocks tennis officials by suggesting boycott of next year's Australian Open

The former world No. 1 Novak Djokovic has shocked tennis officials by floating the possibility of a player boycott of next year’s Australian Open. Djokovic delivered his dramatic suggestion on Friday night, as the annual men’s player meeting in Melbourne – which is attended by around 150 of the world’s best – was drawing to a close. It was part of an unexpected speech, intended to apply pressure to the tour – and especially the grand slams – to deliver bigger pay packets. Djokovic had clearly been preparing his ambush for some time, as he invited a professor of labour law to join him on the podium and discuss the finer points of trade unions. In order to organise a boycott, the argument went, it would be necessary to set up a new union that represented only the players. Because the Association of Tennis Professionals – which is constituted of equal parts players and tournaments – is legally unable to call a strike. It is not that the Australian Open is less popular with the players than other grand slams; quite the reverse, in fact. Only an hour earlier, tournament director Craig Tiley had been telling the meeting that he intended to raise the total prize pot from A$55m this year to over A$100m in the next five years. Tiley, who doubles up as chief executive of Tennis Australia, is seen as the most player-friendly official around. Beyond the Baseline | Read Charlie Eccleshare's three-part series on the unseen side of top-level tennis Rather, there are thought to be legal reasons why a strike might be easier to organise here in Melbourne than in London, Paris or New York. Djokovic’s argument is that the grand slams only pay out around seven per cent of their income, whereas the equivalent figure in American basketball – which was cited as a point of comparison in the meeting – is around 50 per cent. It is understood that Andy Murray, who attended the meeting despite his recent hip surgery, is supportive of the principle that players should be better paid. Roger Federer, however, is believed to favour the status quo in which one body – the ATP – represents the main interests of men’s tennis. Credit: AP Approached after his practice session yesterday, Djokovic declined to comment on his political stance. But his old friend and ally Viktor Troicki was more outspoken in a briefing with Serbian journalists. “Novak is right,” Troicki said. “The grand slams are raising the prize money, but their income gets bigger and bigger. A Players’ Union is a good idea, only united will we have the power to really achieve something. When you look at what grand slams earn, what players are getting paid is ridiculous.” This point was backed up in more temperate terms by Ryan Harrison, the American No. 4, who told reporters “I think there’s a big case to be made as far as percentage goes. If you see an NBA [basketball] player or an NFL [American football] player you think seven figures in their bank account and I don’t think that’s the case even for [some players who] make the main draw at grand slams.” Djokovic’s most zealous supporters are believed to include Gilles Simon – who, like Djokovic himself, is an elected member of the ATP player council – and the fast-rising world No. 4 Alexander Zverev. As well as calling for better redistribution of tournaments’ income streams, these players are thought to resent the grand slams’ insistence on paying equal prize-money to men and women. Gillles Simon pictured playing in the Australian Open Credit: AFP Simon was consulted on his views yesterday in his post-match press conference. He replied that “I don’t share my opinions anymore, because I am really disappointed in the press [coverage] that I had.” But he did concede that he hadn’t changed his opinions recently. In other words, he probably still believes that – as he said in 2012 – “The equality in salaries isn't something that works in sport. Men's tennis remains more attractive than women's tennis at the moment." Djokovic was elected as president of the ATP Player Council in September. His immediate predecessors – doubles specialist Eric Butorac from 2014 to 2016, and Federer before that – had taken a co-operative approach to dealing with the grand slams, who have increased prize money substantially in the past decade. Djokovic is taking a more confrontational stance, although his vice-president Kevin Anderson tried to sound diplomatic yesterday. “Things have got a lot better from where we were four to five years ago,” Anderson said. “Now if you are top 100 you are making a good living. I think we want to push that to 150, 200 and keep going. “I can completely understand that guys feel they want more,” Anderson added. “I think we do deserve more. But I also understand the opposite perspective.”

Kick it or not, extra point makes a big difference in Vegas

CORRECTS SPELLING TO DIGGS NOT RIGGS Minnesota Vikings wide receiver Stefon Diggs (14) and wide receiver Laquon Treadwell (11) celebrate following a 29-24 win over the New Orleans Saints in an NFL divisional football playoff game in Minneapolis, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Home underdogs again, Eagles embrace their role

FILE - In this Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018, file photo, Philadelphia Eagles coach Doug Pederson, center, celebrates a defensive stop on fourth down in the second half of an NFL divisional playoff football game against the Atlanta Falcons in Philadelphia. The Eagles are home underdogs again in the NFC championship game against Case Keenum and the Minnesota Vikings.(AP Photo/Chris Szagola, File)