La NFL en fotos

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Las ultimas fotografías de la NFL

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2005, file phoot, Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre holds his head down as he walks off the field following the NFC wild-card game against the Minnesota Vikings in Green Bay, Wis. Favre says he might have had "thousands" of concussions during his Hall of Fame career. The three-time NFL MVP who played from 1992-2010 and was known for his aggressive approach to football said Thursday, April 12 2018 on NBC's "Megyn Kelly Today" that he is experiencing short-term memory issues. (AP Photo/Darren Hauck, File)
Favre says he went to rehab 3 times to fight addictions
FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2005, file phoot, Green Bay Packers quarterback Brett Favre holds his head down as he walks off the field following the NFC wild-card game against the Minnesota Vikings in Green Bay, Wis. Favre says he might have had "thousands" of concussions during his Hall of Fame career. The three-time NFL MVP who played from 1992-2010 and was known for his aggressive approach to football said Thursday, April 12 2018 on NBC's "Megyn Kelly Today" that he is experiencing short-term memory issues. (AP Photo/Darren Hauck, File)
FILE - In this May 10, 2018, file photo, Detroit Lions head coach Matt Patricia addresses the media at the team's football training facility in Allen Park, Mich. The NFL says sexual assault allegations against Patricia from 1996 are not subject to its personal conduct policy. The league said Monday, May 21, 2018, it has completed its review of the teams interviewing process. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
NFL: Patricia's past not subject to personal conduct policy
FILE - In this May 10, 2018, file photo, Detroit Lions head coach Matt Patricia addresses the media at the team's football training facility in Allen Park, Mich. The NFL says sexual assault allegations against Patricia from 1996 are not subject to its personal conduct policy. The league said Monday, May 21, 2018, it has completed its review of the teams interviewing process. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
FILE - This is a 2017 file photo showing Richie Incognito of the Buffalo Bills NFL football team. Bills offensive lineman Richie Incognito texts The Associated Press he's "done," amid reports he is considering retirement after 11 NFL seasons. Incognito followed up the text on Tuesday, April 20, 2018, with a laughing-face emoji and did not respond to further questions seeking clarification. (AP Photo/File)
Incognito becomes a free agent after being cut by Bills
FILE - This is a 2017 file photo showing Richie Incognito of the Buffalo Bills NFL football team. Bills offensive lineman Richie Incognito texts The Associated Press he's "done," amid reports he is considering retirement after 11 NFL seasons. Incognito followed up the text on Tuesday, April 20, 2018, with a laughing-face emoji and did not respond to further questions seeking clarification. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2018, file photo, Buffalo Bills offensive guard Richie Incognito (64) sets up to block against the Jacksonville Jaguars defensive during the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game in Jacksonville, Fla. Incognito is free to resume his career after the Bills released him from their reserve/retired list on Monday, May 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)
Incognito becomes a free agent after being cut by Bills
FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2018, file photo, Buffalo Bills offensive guard Richie Incognito (64) sets up to block against the Jacksonville Jaguars defensive during the second half of an NFL wild-card playoff football game in Jacksonville, Fla. Incognito is free to resume his career after the Bills released him from their reserve/retired list on Monday, May 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto de archivo del 26 de abril de 2018, el comisionado de la NFL, Roger Goodell, habla desde el estrado durante la primera ronda del draft de la NFL, en Arlington, Texas. Goodell (AP Foto/David J. Phillip, Archivo)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto de archivo del 26 de abril de 2018, el comisionado de la NFL, Roger Goodell, habla desde el estrado durante la primera ronda del draft de la NFL, en Arlington, Texas. Goodell (AP Foto/David J. Phillip, Archivo)
ARCHIVO - En esta foto de archivo del 26 de abril de 2018, el comisionado de la NFL, Roger Goodell, habla desde el estrado durante la primera ronda del draft de la NFL, en Arlington, Texas. Goodell (AP Foto/David J. Phillip, Archivo)
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell speaks from the stage during the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Goodell details NFL's stance on sports gambling after ruling
NFL commissioner Roger Goodell speaks from the stage during the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
New York Giants NFL football cornerback Eli Apple talks with reporters at the team's training camp, Monday, May 21, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Tom Canavan)
Giants CB Eli Apple trying to make the most of second chance
New York Giants NFL football cornerback Eli Apple talks with reporters at the team's training camp, Monday, May 21, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Tom Canavan)
Jockey Mike Smith speaks with NFL New England Patriots head football coach Bill Belichick, right, before the 143rd Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico race course, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Baltimore. Justify with Smith aboard won the race. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Justify wins foggy Preakness, keeps Triple Crown bid alive
Jockey Mike Smith speaks with NFL New England Patriots head football coach Bill Belichick, right, before the 143rd Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico race course, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Baltimore. Justify with Smith aboard won the race. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, left, holds a jersey with Hamilton Tiger-Cats head coach June Jones after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the CFL team at a press conference in Hamilton, Ontario, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, left, holds a jersey with Hamilton Tiger-Cats head coach June Jones after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the CFL team at a press conference in Hamilton, Ontario, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this March 27, 2018 file photo, former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel throws during drills at his alma mater during Texas A&M's football Pro Day in College Station, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke, File)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
FILE - In this March 27, 2018 file photo, former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel throws during drills at his alma mater during Texas A&M's football Pro Day in College Station, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke, File)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this April 7, 2018, file photo, former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) prepares for a developmental Spring League football game in Austin, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, 2018, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
FILE - In this April 7, 2018, file photo, former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) prepares for a developmental Spring League football game in Austin, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, 2018, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Browns' Jamar Taylor gestures during an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers in Cleveland. A person with knowledge of the situation says the Arizona Cardinals are finalizing a trade that would bring cornerback Jamar Taylor from the Cleveland Browns. The person, who sought anonymity because the trade had not been officially announced, said the deal was expected to be completed later in the day Friday, May 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Aaron Josefczyk, File)
Browns send CB Taylor to Cardinals for 2020 draft pick
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Browns' Jamar Taylor gestures during an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers in Cleveland. A person with knowledge of the situation says the Arizona Cardinals are finalizing a trade that would bring cornerback Jamar Taylor from the Cleveland Browns. The person, who sought anonymity because the trade had not been officially announced, said the deal was expected to be completed later in the day Friday, May 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Aaron Josefczyk, File)
Former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) looks to throw during a developmental Spring League football game, Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Manziel is hoping to impress NFL scouts in his bid to return to the league. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) looks to throw during a developmental Spring League football game, Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Manziel is hoping to impress NFL scouts in his bid to return to the league. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Cleveland Browns cornerback Jamar Taylor (21) lines up against the Jacksonville Jaguars during an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017, in Cleveland. (Jeff Haynes/AP Images for Panini)
AP Source: Cardinals finalizing deal for CB Jamar Taylor
Cleveland Browns cornerback Jamar Taylor (21) lines up against the Jacksonville Jaguars during an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017, in Cleveland. (Jeff Haynes/AP Images for Panini)
Oakland Raiders' Kolton Miller (77) runs during an NFL football practice on Friday, May 4, 2018, at the team's training facility in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Raiders sign first-round pick Kolton Miller
Oakland Raiders' Kolton Miller (77) runs during an NFL football practice on Friday, May 4, 2018, at the team's training facility in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
FILE - In this Dec. 26, 2016, file photo, Dallas Cowboys' Randy Gregory stands on the sideline late in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Arlington, Texas. A person with direct knowledge of the application said Friday, May 18, 2018, that Gregory is set to seek reinstatement after missing the 2017 season over multiple violations of the NFLs substance-abuse policy. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade, File)
AP source: Cowboys' Gregory seeks return after yearlong ban
FILE - In this Dec. 26, 2016, file photo, Dallas Cowboys' Randy Gregory stands on the sideline late in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Arlington, Texas. A person with direct knowledge of the application said Friday, May 18, 2018, that Gregory is set to seek reinstatement after missing the 2017 season over multiple violations of the NFLs substance-abuse policy. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade, File)
FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
Knock, knock: Browns there; team set for HBO's 'Hard Knocks'
FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2013, file photo, Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson speaks during a news conference for the NFL football team in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2013, file photo, Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson speaks during a news conference for the NFL football team in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
FILE - Int his May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper mingles during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - Int his May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper mingles during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper, addresses a gathering during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper, addresses a gathering during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2013, file photo, a Carolina Panthers logo is displayed on the field at Bank of America Stadium prior to an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the New York Giants in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2013, file photo, a Carolina Panthers logo is displayed on the field at Bank of America Stadium prior to an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the New York Giants in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn, File)
Alabama head coach Nick Saban poses for photos on the red carpet before the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Alabama-Louisville to kickoff ABC's Saturday Night Football
Alabama head coach Nick Saban poses for photos on the red carpet before the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Alabama linebacker Rashaan Evans speaks at a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. Evans is the Tennessee Titans' top pick in the NFL football draft. The Titans have agreed to terms on a deal with their first-round draft pick LB Rashaan Evans, Tuesday, May 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Wade Payne, File)
Titans agree to terms on deal with linebacker Rashaan Evans
FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Alabama linebacker Rashaan Evans speaks at a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. Evans is the Tennessee Titans' top pick in the NFL football draft. The Titans have agreed to terms on a deal with their first-round draft pick LB Rashaan Evans, Tuesday, May 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Wade Payne, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, an NFL logo is displayed at the opening of "NFL Experience" in Times Square, New York. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision. Hours after the court ruled on Monday, May 14, 2018, the NFL called time-out and asked for an official review. The league called on Congress to enact a core regulatory framework for legalized sports betting." (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
Who will referee billion-dollar sports betting industry?
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, an NFL logo is displayed at the opening of "NFL Experience" in Times Square, New York. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision. Hours after the court ruled on Monday, May 14, 2018, the NFL called time-out and asked for an official review. The league called on Congress to enact a core regulatory framework for legalized sports betting." (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
Carolina Panthers' team owner Jerry Richardson, middle, sits next to his wife, Rosalind to the left, under the team logo and with other guests in his suite during the first half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Panthers won 31-24. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
AP sources: Tepper to buy Panthers for record $2.2 billion
Carolina Panthers' team owner Jerry Richardson, middle, sits next to his wife, Rosalind to the left, under the team logo and with other guests in his suite during the first half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Panthers won 31-24. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
FILE - In an April 25, 2018 file photo, New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning speaks to reporters during NFL football training camp, in East Rutherford, N.J. Jury selection is scheduled to begin on Monday, May 14, 2018, in a New Jersey memorabilia dealers lawsuit that accuses New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning of conspiring with the team's equipment staff to sell bogus "game-used" helmets to unsuspecting collectors as part of a long-running scam.(AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
Settlement reached in Giants, Manning memorabilia fraud case
FILE - In an April 25, 2018 file photo, New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning speaks to reporters during NFL football training camp, in East Rutherford, N.J. Jury selection is scheduled to begin on Monday, May 14, 2018, in a New Jersey memorabilia dealers lawsuit that accuses New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning of conspiring with the team's equipment staff to sell bogus "game-used" helmets to unsuspecting collectors as part of a long-running scam.(AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
Arizona Cardinals' second-round draft pick Christian Kirk (13) runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
Cardinals aware of Christian Kirk arrest before draft
Arizona Cardinals' second-round draft pick Christian Kirk (13) runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2018 file photo, NFL footballs sit on the field during warm ups before an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Jacksonville Jaguars in Pittsburgh. The NFL wants Congress to enact a framework for legalized sports betting in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling that clears the way for more states to allow gambling. All the major leagues responded to a ruling that figures to have far-reaching implications throughout the sports world. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
Lay your money down: Court says states can OK sports betting
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2018 file photo, NFL footballs sit on the field during warm ups before an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Jacksonville Jaguars in Pittsburgh. The NFL wants Congress to enact a framework for legalized sports betting in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling that clears the way for more states to allow gambling. All the major leagues responded to a ruling that figures to have far-reaching implications throughout the sports world. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2017 file photo, Cleveland Browns head coach Hue Jackson answers questions during a news conference after the Baltimore Ravens defeated his team in an NFL football game, in Cleveland. Jackson is making good on his promise to jump into Lake Erie. Jackson announced Monday, May 14, 2018, that he will take a dip into the chilly water on June 1 for charity. Last season, Jackson vowed that if the Browns didnt improve on their 1-15 record from 2016 - his first season - that he would jump into the lake. Cleveland went 0-16 and Jackson is keeping his word. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)
Dive play: Browns coach jumping into Lake Erie for charity
FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2017 file photo, Cleveland Browns head coach Hue Jackson answers questions during a news conference after the Baltimore Ravens defeated his team in an NFL football game, in Cleveland. Jackson is making good on his promise to jump into Lake Erie. Jackson announced Monday, May 14, 2018, that he will take a dip into the chilly water on June 1 for charity. Last season, Jackson vowed that if the Browns didnt improve on their 1-15 record from 2016 - his first season - that he would jump into the lake. Cleveland went 0-16 and Jackson is keeping his word. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1983 file photo Seattle Seahawks coach Chuck Knox listening during a news conference in Miami. Knox, the veteran NFL coach who led the Seattle Seahawks for nine years and took the Los Angeles Rams to three straight NFC championship games, has died. He was 86. Knox died Saturday evening, the Seahawks confirmed Sunday, May 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, file)
Chuck Knox, former Rams, Seahawks, Bills coach, dies at 86
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1983 file photo Seattle Seahawks coach Chuck Knox listening during a news conference in Miami. Knox, the veteran NFL coach who led the Seattle Seahawks for nine years and took the Los Angeles Rams to three straight NFC championship games, has died. He was 86. Knox died Saturday evening, the Seahawks confirmed Sunday, May 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, file)
file-This Nov. 3, 2013 file photo shows Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll reacting to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback being sacked late in overtime in an NFL football game in Seattle. Chuck Knox never did it and neither did Mike Holmgren. The Seattle Seahawks have never had consecutive 10-win regular seasons until now under Pete Carroll. At 10-1, they have the best record in the NFL heading into their bye week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Former Seahawks, LA Rams coach Chuck Knox dies at 86
file-This Nov. 3, 2013 file photo shows Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll reacting to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback being sacked late in overtime in an NFL football game in Seattle. Chuck Knox never did it and neither did Mike Holmgren. The Seattle Seahawks have never had consecutive 10-win regular seasons until now under Pete Carroll. At 10-1, they have the best record in the NFL heading into their bye week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
New York Giants NFL football cornerback Eli Apple talks with reporters at the team's training camp, Monday, May 21, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Tom Canavan)
Giants CB Eli Apple trying to make the most of second chance
New York Giants NFL football cornerback Eli Apple talks with reporters at the team's training camp, Monday, May 21, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Tom Canavan)
Jockey Mike Smith speaks with NFL New England Patriots head football coach Bill Belichick, right, before the 143rd Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico race course, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Baltimore. Justify with Smith aboard won the race. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Justify wins foggy Preakness, keeps Triple Crown bid alive
Jockey Mike Smith speaks with NFL New England Patriots head football coach Bill Belichick, right, before the 143rd Preakness Stakes horse race at Pimlico race course, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Baltimore. Justify with Smith aboard won the race. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, left, holds a jersey with Hamilton Tiger-Cats head coach June Jones after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the CFL team at a press conference in Hamilton, Ontario, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, left, holds a jersey with Hamilton Tiger-Cats head coach June Jones after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the CFL team at a press conference in Hamilton, Ontario, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this March 27, 2018 file photo, former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel throws during drills at his alma mater during Texas A&M's football Pro Day in College Station, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke, File)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
FILE - In this March 27, 2018 file photo, former Cleveland Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel throws during drills at his alma mater during Texas A&M's football Pro Day in College Station, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Michael Wyke, File)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel, speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this April 7, 2018, file photo, former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) prepares for a developmental Spring League football game in Austin, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, 2018, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
FILE - In this April 7, 2018, file photo, former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) prepares for a developmental Spring League football game in Austin, Texas. Manziel is heading to the Canadian Football League, the latest move for the Heisman Trophy winner whose NFL career was a bust with the Cleveland Browns. The quarterback said on Twitter on Saturday, May 19, 2018, he signed with the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former NFL quarterback and Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel speaks at CFL press conference, Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Hamilton, Ontario, after announcing that he has signed a two-year contract to play for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. (Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press via AP)
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Browns' Jamar Taylor gestures during an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers in Cleveland. A person with knowledge of the situation says the Arizona Cardinals are finalizing a trade that would bring cornerback Jamar Taylor from the Cleveland Browns. The person, who sought anonymity because the trade had not been officially announced, said the deal was expected to be completed later in the day Friday, May 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Aaron Josefczyk, File)
Browns send CB Taylor to Cardinals for 2020 draft pick
FILE - In this Dec. 24, 2016, file photo, Cleveland Browns' Jamar Taylor gestures during an NFL football game against the San Diego Chargers in Cleveland. A person with knowledge of the situation says the Arizona Cardinals are finalizing a trade that would bring cornerback Jamar Taylor from the Cleveland Browns. The person, who sought anonymity because the trade had not been officially announced, said the deal was expected to be completed later in the day Friday, May 18, 2018. (AP Photo/Aaron Josefczyk, File)
Former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) looks to throw during a developmental Spring League football game, Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Manziel is hoping to impress NFL scouts in his bid to return to the league. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Johnny Manziel signs with CFL in path back to football
Former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Johnny Manziel (2) looks to throw during a developmental Spring League football game, Saturday, April 7, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Manziel is hoping to impress NFL scouts in his bid to return to the league. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Cleveland Browns cornerback Jamar Taylor (21) lines up against the Jacksonville Jaguars during an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017, in Cleveland. (Jeff Haynes/AP Images for Panini)
AP Source: Cardinals finalizing deal for CB Jamar Taylor
Cleveland Browns cornerback Jamar Taylor (21) lines up against the Jacksonville Jaguars during an NFL football game, Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017, in Cleveland. (Jeff Haynes/AP Images for Panini)
Oakland Raiders' Kolton Miller (77) runs during an NFL football practice on Friday, May 4, 2018, at the team's training facility in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
Raiders sign first-round pick Kolton Miller
Oakland Raiders' Kolton Miller (77) runs during an NFL football practice on Friday, May 4, 2018, at the team's training facility in Alameda, Calif. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
FILE - In this Dec. 26, 2016, file photo, Dallas Cowboys' Randy Gregory stands on the sideline late in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Arlington, Texas. A person with direct knowledge of the application said Friday, May 18, 2018, that Gregory is set to seek reinstatement after missing the 2017 season over multiple violations of the NFLs substance-abuse policy. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade, File)
AP source: Cowboys' Gregory seeks return after yearlong ban
FILE - In this Dec. 26, 2016, file photo, Dallas Cowboys' Randy Gregory stands on the sideline late in the second half of an NFL football game against the Detroit Lions in Arlington, Texas. A person with direct knowledge of the application said Friday, May 18, 2018, that Gregory is set to seek reinstatement after missing the 2017 season over multiple violations of the NFLs substance-abuse policy. (AP Photo/Brandon Wade, File)
FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
Knock, knock: Browns there; team set for HBO's 'Hard Knocks'
FILE - In this May 4, 2018, file photo, Cleveland Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) runs a drill during rookie minicamp at the NFL football team's training camp facility in Berea, Ohio. A person familiar with the decision says the Browns will appear on HBO's "Hard Knocks" this season. Coming off a historic 0-16 season, the Browns were chosen after declining the opportunity several times, said the person who spoke Thursday, May 17, to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2013, file photo, Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson speaks during a news conference for the NFL football team in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this Jan. 15, 2013, file photo, Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson speaks during a news conference for the NFL football team in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton, File)
FILE - Int his May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper mingles during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - Int his May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper mingles during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper, addresses a gathering during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this May 10, 2016, file photo, billionaire hedge fund manager David Tepper, addresses a gathering during a grand opening of rock star and philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi's Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation Soul Kitchen and B.E.A.T. Center, which stands for Bringing Everyone All Together, in Toms River, N.J. People familiar with the situation say Tepper has agreed to buy the Carolina Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2013, file photo, a Carolina Panthers logo is displayed on the field at Bank of America Stadium prior to an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the New York Giants in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn, File)
Panthers: Signed agreement to sell NFL team to David Tepper
FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2013, file photo, a Carolina Panthers logo is displayed on the field at Bank of America Stadium prior to an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the New York Giants in Charlotte, N.C. People familiar with the situation say hedge fund manager David Tepper has agreed to buy the Panthers from team founder Jerry Richardson for a record $2.2 billion. The people spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, on condition of anonymity because the team has not yet announced the sale. The purchase is subject to a vote at the NFL owners meeting next week in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Mike McCarn, File)
Alabama head coach Nick Saban poses for photos on the red carpet before the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Alabama-Louisville to kickoff ABC's Saturday Night Football
Alabama head coach Nick Saban poses for photos on the red carpet before the first round of the NFL football draft, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Arlington, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Alabama linebacker Rashaan Evans speaks at a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. Evans is the Tennessee Titans' top pick in the NFL football draft. The Titans have agreed to terms on a deal with their first-round draft pick LB Rashaan Evans, Tuesday, May 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Wade Payne, File)
Titans agree to terms on deal with linebacker Rashaan Evans
FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Alabama linebacker Rashaan Evans speaks at a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. Evans is the Tennessee Titans' top pick in the NFL football draft. The Titans have agreed to terms on a deal with their first-round draft pick LB Rashaan Evans, Tuesday, May 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Wade Payne, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, an NFL logo is displayed at the opening of "NFL Experience" in Times Square, New York. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision. Hours after the court ruled on Monday, May 14, 2018, the NFL called time-out and asked for an official review. The league called on Congress to enact a core regulatory framework for legalized sports betting." (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
Who will referee billion-dollar sports betting industry?
FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017, file photo, an NFL logo is displayed at the opening of "NFL Experience" in Times Square, New York. Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for states to legalize sports betting, the race is on to see who will referee the multi-billion-dollar business expected to emerge from the decision. Hours after the court ruled on Monday, May 14, 2018, the NFL called time-out and asked for an official review. The league called on Congress to enact a core regulatory framework for legalized sports betting." (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
Carolina Panthers' team owner Jerry Richardson, middle, sits next to his wife, Rosalind to the left, under the team logo and with other guests in his suite during the first half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Panthers won 31-24. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
AP sources: Tepper to buy Panthers for record $2.2 billion
Carolina Panthers' team owner Jerry Richardson, middle, sits next to his wife, Rosalind to the left, under the team logo and with other guests in his suite during the first half of an NFL football game against the Green Bay Packers in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017. The Panthers won 31-24. (AP Photo/Bob Leverone)
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
Arsene Wenger replacement: Definitive guide to the runners and riders for the new Arsenal manager
Arsenal's announcement that Arsène Wenger will step down as manager after 22 years in charge sent shockwaves through English football. Despite widespread acceptance that a parting of the ways was the correct decision, nobody anticipated the timing of the news. After days of tributes and retrospectives on Wenger's reign, attention turned to who Arsenal would choose to succeed the most successful manager in the club's history. Would it be a legendary former player, a youthful head coach with big ideas or a charismatic manager with stature and gravitas? The search is on, and here is everything you need to know about the process. What are Arsenal looking for? Who better to ask than chief executive Ivan Gazidis? In his press conference at the Emirates the day Wenger's departure was announced, he outlined some of the attributes Arsenal value in a manger (without giving too much away, of course). Gazidis said: What I will say is that it’s important to me that we continue the football values that Arsene has instilled in the club, I want to see someone who can continue that for our fans and our fans want to see that, someone who will continue to play exciting, progressive football that gets people interested and excited in the games we play. I also think there is a significant piece in Arsenal Football Club in how the candidate represents the club and I think it’s important to Arsenal fans. So those qualities. Gazidis also spoke about the importance of a coach who gives opportunities to young players, before adding: I think we’ve got to be open-minded and also brave in the decision. When Arsene was appointed, I don’t think he was on many people’s radar screens. And that doesn’t mean that we have to make an another appointment that not everybody is thinking about and talking about. But it does mean we need to be bold in the appointment and get the person that we believe is the right person. Another priority for Arsenal is finding a candidate who can heal the divisions in the fanbase. Although most supporters were unified in their belief the time was right for change, the last five years and more have been marred by in-fighting among Arsenal fans. So much so that they have become their own online 'meme'. Apathy overtook anger this season, with thousands of season ticket holders staying away and leaving their seats empty. While Arsenal will not make a populist appointment simply to appease the masses, they will want to avoid a corrosive character who will re-open old wounds. Our man Jeremy Wilson reports that Arsenal are exploring 'a range of younger head coach-style options', and want someone 'with the coaching track-record to bring out the best in the existing squad while also progressing the club’s younger players'. Re-uniting the fan base will be one of Arsenal's priorities Credit: Reuters What have Arsenal done previously? One of the most intriguing aspects of the story. Arsenal have not needed to appoint a manager since 1996, so when trying to second guess their intentions we are starting from scratch. New head of football relations Raul Sanllehi oversaw several managerial changes at Barcelona, while new head of recruitment Sven Mislintat has seen coaches come and go at Borussia Dortmund. This is Gazidis' first experience of the process, however. Arsenal as a club do have a history of making the kind of left-field, 'bold' appointments Gazidis spoke of. Wenger himself famously arrived from Japanese club Nagoya Grampus Eight, George Graham was manager of second division Millwall while 1971 double-winner Bertie Mee was a physio. Arsenal surprised everyone with the appointment of Arsene Wenger Credit: ALLSPORT That could be music to the ears of majority shareholder Stan Kroenke, who has had success in another sporting venture by appointing a young up-and-comer. His NFL franchise the LA Rams were stagnant under long-serving coach Jeff Fisher, but their fortunes have been revived by Sean McVay - the youngest coach in NFL history. Some clues for Arsenal fans there, perhaps. Who are the key decision makers? Gazidis, Sanllehi and Mislintat will all have a say, with Matt Law reporting in the Daily Telegraph last month that the trio each have their preferred candidates, which could be a source of tension. Ultimately, it will be down to Gazidis to present Kroenke with their recommendations who will sign off on any decision. Kroenke could be assisted by son Josh, who spent three months in London this year familiarising himself with Arsenal operations. The younger Kroenke is thought to be a key ally of Gazidis, and his opinion could prove important. Father and Son: Stand and Josh Kroenke Credit: Getty Images What do the betting markets suggest? The odds on next Arsenal manager were quite volatile in the weeks before the announcement, as is usually the case in markets with low liquidity (not many bets being matched). The news that Thomas Tuchel is likely to join Paris Saint-Germain has seen him fall out of the running, while Massimiliano Allegri and Zeljko Buvac have moved to the front of the market. Neither favourite looks a cast-iron certainty, however. There have been nibbles on Eddie Howe and Carlo Ancelotti at bigger prices. Change in Arsenal manager odds Buvac is the leading candidate to succeed Wenger What now for Arsene Wenger? Wenger has said he will take a four or five week break at the end of the season to review his future. The Frenchman has expressed a desire to continue working, and will be at the World Cup in Russia as a television pundit. Those who know Wenger say he is still full of enthusiasm and vitality, and the 68-year-old is in good health. There are long-running links to the France job, though Wenger's love of day-to-day work on the training ground could put him off international management. Wenger has said it would be 'difficult' emotionally to manage another Premier League team, but hopes he has not managed his last match in the Champions League. All that suggests he might be open to a European club job. What next for Arsene Wenger - the departing Arsenal manager's possible destinations The contenders Mikel Arteta Odds: 1/3 Pros: The emotional bond fans felt towards Wenger could be maintained with the appointment of a former player, with supporters rooting for 'one of their own'. Not many players are offered jobs by Pep Guardiola, Mauricio Pochettino and Arsenal as soon as they retire so Arteta is obviously a smart cookie. Will have learnt so much in two years under Guardiola and potentially has a very a high ceiling. A club man who will defer to the new structure and hierarchy. Cons: No managerial experience. Arteta has also played alongside several members of Arsenal's squad - how will that affect his ability to make ruthless and difficult decisions? Possible that fans will have little patience with a rookie. Brendan Rodgers Odds: 6/1 Pros:Coaches attractive and progressive football, and has an impressive history of developing young attackers. Led Liverpool to within touching distance of their first title since 1990, and has done all that could be asked of him (and a bit more) at Celtic. Cons:The teeth, the tan, the catchphrases. Arsenal became a running joke in the late-Wenger years, and Rodgers also lends himself to parody. Would be deeply unpopular with the fans, something likely to count against him. His Liverpool side were also beset by defensive weaknesses, the very area Arsenal urgently need improvement. How Arsene Wenger's potential replacements would change Arsenal Massimiliano Allegri Odds: 13/2 Pros: A proven track record at the highest level of European football, Allegri has guided to Juventus to successive Serie A titles and two Champions League finals. Like Wenger, is a highly respected figure within football who would be a classy public face for the club. Already has experience of succeeding as a much-loved manager (Antonio Conte) and won over the Juve fans who were unhappy with his appointment. Would bring a more pragmatic approach to Arsenal's football. Cons: Liverpool and Spurs have bettered Arsenal in the past two seasons with coaches who have a clear playing identity or 'philosophy'. Allegri is not quite like that. The Italian said "You think tackling, passing & running wins in football. Footballing discussions in Italy is all about tactics and theory, you’re ruining the game. You don’t look at players or skills, but only formations. This is what damages our football." His tactical flexibility is a virtue, but there is a school of thought it is best served fine-tuning elite teams. Arsenal are more of a project at present. Carlo Ancelotti Odds: 14/1 Pros: A safe pair of hands who could steer Arsenal through what some believe could be a difficult transition. Essentially, he would ensure the club avoid a 'Moyes' situation. Has managed in England before, winning the double with Chelsea in 2010. A friendly and avuncular figure who the fans would warm too. Cons: Too similar to Wenger in his methods. Arsenal watchers have long felt their players suffer due to a lack of prescriptive coaching, with Wenger leaving them to find their own solutions. Ancelotti is also more of a manager than a coach, and a laissez-faire approach could result in more of the same. Luis Enrique won the treble at Barcelona Credit: Getty Images Luis Enrique Odds: 12/1 Pros: Has a crystal clear idea of how he wants football to be played, and won the treble at Barcelona. Enrique has a working relationship with Sanllehi, and unlike other names on this list has experience of managing a big European club. Cons: A disastrous spell at Roma is a black mark on his CV, and reports suggest he will make huge financial demands both contractually and in the transfer market. Enrique can also be a spiky and abrasive character who had frequent run-ins with the press at Barcelona. While Wenger was no stranger to the odd moan, he was also a master of charm in press conferences. Moreover, while it would be ridiculous to say managing Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez and Neymar is 'easy', it does make his work at the Nou Camp difficult to assess. Zeljko Buvac is a surprise candidate Credit: Reuters Julian Nagelsmann Odds: 14/1 Pros:A possible dark horse who ticks plenty of Arsenal's boxes. Was appointed Hoffenheim head coach at the age of 28 in 2015, leading them away from relegation trouble in his first season and qualifying for the Champions League in his second. Coaches a dynamic, energetic style based on fast recoveries of possession and looks a huge prospect. Would fit into Arsenal's structure seamlessly, and is another networked German. Cons: The move might be two or three years too soon for him. Nagelsmann might be better off developing elsewhere. Zeljko Buvac Odds: 20/1 Pros: Known as 'The Brain', Buvac is a highly-regarded coach with an intimate knowledge of Arsenal and the Premier League working as Jurgen Klopp's No.2 at Liverpool. Buvac would not demand a transfer warchest - his priority would be getting Arsenal training methods up to speed and extracting the most out of a talented, if unbalanced, squad. Would bring ideas and necessary organisation to Arsenal's play. Cons: Has not managed since 2001, does not speak English and has never dealt with media commitments. It seems slightly strange that a 57-year-old has not gone it alone before if he really had managerial ambitions. A significant section of the fanbase would greet him with scepticism. Eddie Howe Odds: 25/1 Pros: See Rodgers. There is no faulting his work at Bournemouth, and Arsenal just might be attracted to the idea of swimming against the stream and appointing an English manager. Cons: It would feel a bit 'Moyes-ey'. A spell at Burnley did not quite work out for Howe, raising suspicions he might be uniquely suited to Bournemouth. No big club experience. Like Rodgers, his teams also leak cheap goals. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Joachim Löw Odds: 33/1 Pros: He's a world champion, and has also built a successful team around Mesut Özil. With Per Mertesacker as head of the academy and Arsenal's recent purchases from the Bundesliga, there are obvious connections. Tactically fluid. Cons: Löw has not managed at club level since he left Austria Vienna in 2004, and the demands of a top club job are very different to guiding a team through a summer tournament. Leonardo Jardim Odds: 33/1 Pros: Some of the brightest talents in European football have passed through Jardim's hands at Monaco, and he stitched them together in a stylish team that won Ligue 1 and reached the Champions League semi-finals last season. Is used to working at a club that cuts its cloth accordingly in the transfer market, selling their best players for huge fees and reinvesting in the squad. Arsenal will not plan on losing players at the frequency of Monaco, but they also have to be realistic about their place in the financial pecking order. Only 43 years old, too. Cons:Far from a compelling personality, Arsenal might want more from their figurehead. Will Arsenal's scouting be as fruitful as Monaco's? Could Patrick Vieira be the man to succeed Arsene Wenger? Credit: AP Patrick Vieira Odds: 33/1 Pros: See Arteta, but with the added advantage of managing a team of his own (New York City in the MLS). A club legend who could galvanise the fan-base, and who will have the instant respect of the players. Cons: His abilities as a coach are very difficult to ascertain. While Vieira's ability as a player is undisputed, he also had a difficult relationship with the club during summer sagas that saw him push for a move, particularly when Real Madrid came calling. Would he do the same as a manager? Odds correct on May 15 and via Betfair/Paddy Power.
FILE - In an April 25, 2018 file photo, New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning speaks to reporters during NFL football training camp, in East Rutherford, N.J. Jury selection is scheduled to begin on Monday, May 14, 2018, in a New Jersey memorabilia dealers lawsuit that accuses New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning of conspiring with the team's equipment staff to sell bogus "game-used" helmets to unsuspecting collectors as part of a long-running scam.(AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
Settlement reached in Giants, Manning memorabilia fraud case
FILE - In an April 25, 2018 file photo, New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning speaks to reporters during NFL football training camp, in East Rutherford, N.J. Jury selection is scheduled to begin on Monday, May 14, 2018, in a New Jersey memorabilia dealers lawsuit that accuses New York Giants quarterback Eli Manning of conspiring with the team's equipment staff to sell bogus "game-used" helmets to unsuspecting collectors as part of a long-running scam.(AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
El quarterback de los Gigantes de Nueva York, Eli Manning, habla con sus compañeros durante un campamento de entrenamiento de la NFL en East Rutherford, Nueva Jersey, el martes 24 de abril de 2018. (AP Foto/Seth Wenig)
Arizona Cardinals' second-round draft pick Christian Kirk (13) runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
Cardinals aware of Christian Kirk arrest before draft
Arizona Cardinals' second-round draft pick Christian Kirk (13) runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2018 file photo, NFL footballs sit on the field during warm ups before an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Jacksonville Jaguars in Pittsburgh. The NFL wants Congress to enact a framework for legalized sports betting in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling that clears the way for more states to allow gambling. All the major leagues responded to a ruling that figures to have far-reaching implications throughout the sports world. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
Lay your money down: Court says states can OK sports betting
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 2018 file photo, NFL footballs sit on the field during warm ups before an NFL divisional football AFC playoff game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Jacksonville Jaguars in Pittsburgh. The NFL wants Congress to enact a framework for legalized sports betting in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling that clears the way for more states to allow gambling. All the major leagues responded to a ruling that figures to have far-reaching implications throughout the sports world. (AP Photo/Don Wright, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2017 file photo, Cleveland Browns head coach Hue Jackson answers questions during a news conference after the Baltimore Ravens defeated his team in an NFL football game, in Cleveland. Jackson is making good on his promise to jump into Lake Erie. Jackson announced Monday, May 14, 2018, that he will take a dip into the chilly water on June 1 for charity. Last season, Jackson vowed that if the Browns didnt improve on their 1-15 record from 2016 - his first season - that he would jump into the lake. Cleveland went 0-16 and Jackson is keeping his word. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)
Dive play: Browns coach jumping into Lake Erie for charity
FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2017 file photo, Cleveland Browns head coach Hue Jackson answers questions during a news conference after the Baltimore Ravens defeated his team in an NFL football game, in Cleveland. Jackson is making good on his promise to jump into Lake Erie. Jackson announced Monday, May 14, 2018, that he will take a dip into the chilly water on June 1 for charity. Last season, Jackson vowed that if the Browns didnt improve on their 1-15 record from 2016 - his first season - that he would jump into the lake. Cleveland went 0-16 and Jackson is keeping his word. (AP Photo/David Richard, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1983 file photo Seattle Seahawks coach Chuck Knox listening during a news conference in Miami. Knox, the veteran NFL coach who led the Seattle Seahawks for nine years and took the Los Angeles Rams to three straight NFC championship games, has died. He was 86. Knox died Saturday evening, the Seahawks confirmed Sunday, May 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, file)
Chuck Knox, former Rams, Seahawks, Bills coach, dies at 86
FILE - In this Dec. 31, 1983 file photo Seattle Seahawks coach Chuck Knox listening during a news conference in Miami. Knox, the veteran NFL coach who led the Seattle Seahawks for nine years and took the Los Angeles Rams to three straight NFC championship games, has died. He was 86. Knox died Saturday evening, the Seahawks confirmed Sunday, May 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens, file)
file-This Nov. 3, 2013 file photo shows Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll reacting to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback being sacked late in overtime in an NFL football game in Seattle. Chuck Knox never did it and neither did Mike Holmgren. The Seattle Seahawks have never had consecutive 10-win regular seasons until now under Pete Carroll. At 10-1, they have the best record in the NFL heading into their bye week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Former Seahawks, LA Rams coach Chuck Knox dies at 86
file-This Nov. 3, 2013 file photo shows Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll reacting to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback being sacked late in overtime in an NFL football game in Seattle. Chuck Knox never did it and neither did Mike Holmgren. The Seattle Seahawks have never had consecutive 10-win regular seasons until now under Pete Carroll. At 10-1, they have the best record in the NFL heading into their bye week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
New York Giants head coach Pat Shurmur speaks at a news conference at NFL football rookie camp, Friday, May 11, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Shurmur: Collins shouldn't talk about Flowers situation
New York Giants head coach Pat Shurmur speaks at a news conference at NFL football rookie camp, Friday, May 11, 2018, in East Rutherford, N.J. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Tennessee Titans linebacker Harold Landry (58) runs a drill during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Titans' top draft pick gets personal time with coach Vrabel
Tennessee Titans linebacker Harold Landry (58) runs a drill during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Vrabel watches as players stretch during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Titans' top draft pick gets personal time with coach Vrabel
Tennessee Titans head coach Mike Vrabel watches as players stretch during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Tennessee Titans linebacker Rashaan Evans (54), the team's top draft pick, runs a drill with Robert Spillane (52), Chequan Burkett (50) and Nick DeLuca (46) during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Titans' top draft pick gets personal time with coach Vrabel
Tennessee Titans linebacker Rashaan Evans (54), the team's top draft pick, runs a drill with Robert Spillane (52), Chequan Burkett (50) and Nick DeLuca (46) during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Tennessee Titans wide receiver Devin Ross (83) stretches during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Titans' top draft pick gets personal time with coach Vrabel
Tennessee Titans wide receiver Devin Ross (83) stretches during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Tennessee Titans quarterback Luke Falk (11) stretches during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Titans' top draft pick gets personal time with coach Vrabel
Tennessee Titans quarterback Luke Falk (11) stretches during NFL football rookie minicamp Saturday, May 12, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
Buffalo Bills rookie linebacker Tremaine Edmunds (49) takes part in drills during the team's NFL football rookie minicamp, Friday, May 11, 2018, in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jeffrey T. Barnes)
Bills sign linebacker Tremaine Edmunds to 4-year deal
Buffalo Bills rookie linebacker Tremaine Edmunds (49) takes part in drills during the team's NFL football rookie minicamp, Friday, May 11, 2018, in Orchard Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jeffrey T. Barnes)
FILE - In this March 22, 2018, file photo, Stanford's defensive back Justin Reid runs a drill during Pro Day in Stanford, Calif. Reid of the Houston Texans used to frequent his older brothers house to watch NFL game film and study game preparations. The visits while he was at Stanford gave him a behind-the-scenes look at the NFL life of his older brother, Eric Reid, who was thriving with the San Francisco 49ers. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File
Texans' Reid says time with brother gave him jump start
FILE - In this March 22, 2018, file photo, Stanford's defensive back Justin Reid runs a drill during Pro Day in Stanford, Calif. Reid of the Houston Texans used to frequent his older brothers house to watch NFL game film and study game preparations. The visits while he was at Stanford gave him a behind-the-scenes look at the NFL life of his older brother, Eric Reid, who was thriving with the San Francisco 49ers. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File
Los Angeles Chargers coach Anthony Lynn smiles during the team's NFL football rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
Chargers coach Lynn to get college degree 26 years later
Los Angeles Chargers coach Anthony Lynn smiles during the team's NFL football rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
Washington Redskins Senior Vice President of Player Personnel Doug Williams watches during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp at the Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Friday, May 11, 2018. Williams' connection to Grambling and other Historically Black Colleges and Universities could be a boon for the Redskins in finding another source of talent. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Redskins' Doug Williams keeps an eye out for HBCU talent
Washington Redskins Senior Vice President of Player Personnel Doug Williams watches during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp at the Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Friday, May 11, 2018. Williams' connection to Grambling and other Historically Black Colleges and Universities could be a boon for the Redskins in finding another source of talent. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Washington Redskin's second-round pick Derrius Guice (29) and Martez Carter (22) from Grambling State, perform stretching exercises at the NFL football team's rookie minicamp at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Friday, May 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Redskins' Doug Williams keeps an eye out for HBCU talent
Washington Redskin's second-round pick Derrius Guice (29) and Martez Carter (22) from Grambling State, perform stretching exercises at the NFL football team's rookie minicamp at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Friday, May 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen (3) stands with his teammates during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
Rosen says focus all football on first day in Cardinals camp
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen (3) stands with his teammates during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen stretches during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Rosen says focus all football on first day in Cardinals camp
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen stretches during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Rosen says focus all football on first day in Cardinals camp
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Rosen says focus all football on first day in Cardinals camp
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen runs drills during NFL football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen (3) runs drills during NFL football football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Rosen says focus all football on first day in Cardinals camp
Arizona Cardinals' first-round draft pick Josh Rosen (3) runs drills during NFL football football rookie camp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Matt York)
FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2015, file photo, New England Patriots safeties coach Brian Flores, right, walks on the sideline during NFL football practice in Tempe, Ariz. The Partiots will have a new look on defense, with Flores taking over play calling duties following defensive coordinator Matt Patricia's departure. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
Pats' McDaniels: No promises came with decision to return
FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2015, file photo, New England Patriots safeties coach Brian Flores, right, walks on the sideline during NFL football practice in Tempe, Ariz. The Partiots will have a new look on defense, with Flores taking over play calling duties following defensive coordinator Matt Patricia's departure. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, right, talks with safety's coach Brian Flores as they walk out to the field before practice begins at the NFL football team's facility in Foxborough, Mass. It looked like the Patriots would be replacing both of their coordinators following February's Super Bowl loss to Philadelphia. McDaniels walked away from a deal to coach the Colts. But there will be a new look on defense, with Flores taking over play calling duties following defensive coordinator Matt Patricia's departure. AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)
Pats' McDaniels: No promises came with decision to return
FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2014, file photo, New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels, right, talks with safety's coach Brian Flores as they walk out to the field before practice begins at the NFL football team's facility in Foxborough, Mass. It looked like the Patriots would be replacing both of their coordinators following February's Super Bowl loss to Philadelphia. McDaniels walked away from a deal to coach the Colts. But there will be a new look on defense, with Flores taking over play calling duties following defensive coordinator Matt Patricia's departure. AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)
Chicago Bears players stretch during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears players stretch during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears wide receiver Anthony Miller catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears wide receiver Anthony Miller catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears defensive back Michael Joseph catches a pass during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears defensive back Michael Joseph catches a pass during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears linebacker Roquan Smith talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears linebacker Roquan Smith talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears linebacker Roquan Smith talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears linebacker Roquan Smith talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears linebacker Joel Iyiegbuniwe talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears linebacker Joel Iyiegbuniwe talks to reporters before the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears wide receiver Garrett Johnson catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears wide receiver Garrett Johnson catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Chicago Bears defensive back Kevin Toliver II catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
Roquan Smith puts focus on football at Bears rookie camp
Chicago Bears defensive back Kevin Toliver II catches a ball during the NFL football team's rookie minicamp Friday, May 11, 2018, in Lake Forest, Ill. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

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