LA Galaxy campeón de la MLS

El experimento Beckham tuvo un final de cuento de hadas, el Galaxy es campeón.

Head coach Bob Bradley talks with reporters during the introduction of players and coaches at the first training camp of the Los Angeles Football Club MLS soccer team on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Expansion LAFC reveals jerseys with YouTube TV sponsor deal
Head coach Bob Bradley talks with reporters during the introduction of players and coaches at the first training camp of the Los Angeles Football Club MLS soccer team on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
<p>Time is running out on the MLS offseason and, with it, commissioner Don Garber’s hope (and that of many fans) that the current round of expansion will be finalized before the league’s 23rd campaign kicks off.</p><p>The games begin March 3. The race to be named MLS’s 26th team, which actually could wind up being the 24th to take the field, now looks like it’s going to extend beyond that date.</p><p>But maybe not too far beyond.</p><p>Appearing on <a href="https://www.si.com/soccer/2018/01/24/don-garber-mls-expansion-columbus-aly-wagner-alexis-sanchez-barco-uswnt" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:SI TV’s Planet Fútbol show in late January" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">SI TV’s <i>Planet Fútbol</i> show in late January</a>, Garber said, “My guess is hopefully before the start of the season,” when asked when the next expansion club would be identified. Nashville was granted a franchise in mid-December and FC Cincinnati, the Sacramento Republic and a Detroit bid fronted by NBA owners Dan Gilbert and Tom Gores were vying for the second and final award of the round (which doesn’t include Miami).</p><p>Originally, MLS hoped to name both new teams before the end of 2017. Then, it hoped to have it done by the start of the ‘18 season. And Garber sounded optimistic last month it could happen.</p><p>“No issues there. Just dotting the Is and crossing the Ts,” he said.</p><p>But opening day approaches, there are no plans for an announcement and with Sacramento still looking for a new investor and Cincinnati involved in a public (and occasionally passionate) dialogue over its preferred West End stadium site, it appears this marathon still has a few miles to go.</p><p>“Although we haven’t finalized any deals and all of the finalist markets remain under consideration, we’ve made the most progress in Cincinnati,” MLS president and deputy commissioner Mark Abbott told SI.com on Friday.</p><p>Reflecting on Garber’s January comment, it turns out there are lots of Is to dot and a T to cross in “Cincinnati.” The USL club owned primarily by local insurance and financial services billionaire Carl Lindner III remains the heavy favorite.</p><p>“We don’t have, and don’t need to have, a fixed deadline, and we will wait until all of the necessary elements are in place before selecting the next club,” Abbott said. “Whether the announcement is in a few weeks or a couple months is dependent on finalizing the details, but I don’t anticipate that it will be an extended period of time.”</p><p>Cincinnati’s stadium situation is complex. The team has either three sites or no sites, depending on how particular you want to be. The clearest path to an arena runs through Oakley, a growing neighborhood about five miles northeast of central Cincinnati. The club will get $51 million in infrastructure funding in Oakley—FCC will finance construction of the stadium itself—and MLS typically is reluctant to turn its back on public money. But it also typically prefers to be closer to downtown, and the league would rather see FCC play in the West End or even in Newport, Kentucky, which is just across the Ohio river.</p><p>It’s possible the infrastructure funding could be available for the West End site (Hamilton County has agreed to pay for a 1,000-space parking garage), but building in such a densely populated area—the club would replace and relocate a high school football stadium—inevitably creates concern among residents. FCC president Jeff Berding, a former Cincinnati city councilman and Bengals executive, has faced a bit of heat at recent school board and community meetings.</p><p>Berding was unavailable to comment Friday.</p><p>Abbott said there was no handshake deal with FC Cincinnati in place that might allow the club to lobby for the West End site with maximum leverage. FCC already has several advantages in the expansion race, after all. It has the billionaire owner Sacramento needs and the commitment to build a new stadium still absent in Detroit. Even if FCC doesn’t secure the ideal site, it’s still the furthest along among the three finalists.</p><p>That doesn’t mean Sacramento has given up. Investor Kevin Nagle was unable to deliver a fully-funded proposal when meeting with MLS in December, and Republic suffered another blow when billionaire technology executive Meg Whitman bowed out as a minority owner soon thereafter. But multiple sources have confirmed <a href="http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/news-columns-blogs/city-beat/article200400399.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:a recent report in The Sacramento Bee" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">a recent report in <i>The Sacramento Bee</i></a> that Nagle has received expressions of interest from several potential partners, and he said he’s willing to step aside as the lead investor in order to make MLS happen. Nagle’s group already includes the San Francisco 49ers and several investors in the Sacramento Kings.</p><p>The league likes the market and Republic’s Railyard stadium plan, and even if FCC is awarded the next franchise, Sacramento immediately becomes a favorite to land No. 27 or 28. A lot of the hard work in California’s capital already has been done. No timeline has been announced for the awarding of those final two expansion slots, but it’s understood that the 12 cities that applied in January 2017 remain the ones under consideration.</p><p>If Cincinnati gets its team soon, it also becomes the most likely to kick off in 2019 and bring MLS back to an even number of members. MLS and FCC have looked at what Nippert Stadium might need to host league matches for a season or two, and the team already has some of the required technical infrastructure in place. Garber and David Beckham both said Miami would begin play in 2020. Nashville also isn’t too interested in rushing to take the field as it approaches its inaugural season in the USL (FCC is entering its third).</p><p>Los Angeles FC’s arrival this season leaves MLS at 23 teams. The league’s board of governors is scheduled to meet in mid April in Los Angeles.</p>
Next MLS Expansion Decision Likely to Come After Start of 2018 Season

Time is running out on the MLS offseason and, with it, commissioner Don Garber’s hope (and that of many fans) that the current round of expansion will be finalized before the league’s 23rd campaign kicks off.

The games begin March 3. The race to be named MLS’s 26th team, which actually could wind up being the 24th to take the field, now looks like it’s going to extend beyond that date.

But maybe not too far beyond.

Appearing on SI TV’s Planet Fútbol show in late January, Garber said, “My guess is hopefully before the start of the season,” when asked when the next expansion club would be identified. Nashville was granted a franchise in mid-December and FC Cincinnati, the Sacramento Republic and a Detroit bid fronted by NBA owners Dan Gilbert and Tom Gores were vying for the second and final award of the round (which doesn’t include Miami).

Originally, MLS hoped to name both new teams before the end of 2017. Then, it hoped to have it done by the start of the ‘18 season. And Garber sounded optimistic last month it could happen.

“No issues there. Just dotting the Is and crossing the Ts,” he said.

But opening day approaches, there are no plans for an announcement and with Sacramento still looking for a new investor and Cincinnati involved in a public (and occasionally passionate) dialogue over its preferred West End stadium site, it appears this marathon still has a few miles to go.

“Although we haven’t finalized any deals and all of the finalist markets remain under consideration, we’ve made the most progress in Cincinnati,” MLS president and deputy commissioner Mark Abbott told SI.com on Friday.

Reflecting on Garber’s January comment, it turns out there are lots of Is to dot and a T to cross in “Cincinnati.” The USL club owned primarily by local insurance and financial services billionaire Carl Lindner III remains the heavy favorite.

“We don’t have, and don’t need to have, a fixed deadline, and we will wait until all of the necessary elements are in place before selecting the next club,” Abbott said. “Whether the announcement is in a few weeks or a couple months is dependent on finalizing the details, but I don’t anticipate that it will be an extended period of time.”

Cincinnati’s stadium situation is complex. The team has either three sites or no sites, depending on how particular you want to be. The clearest path to an arena runs through Oakley, a growing neighborhood about five miles northeast of central Cincinnati. The club will get $51 million in infrastructure funding in Oakley—FCC will finance construction of the stadium itself—and MLS typically is reluctant to turn its back on public money. But it also typically prefers to be closer to downtown, and the league would rather see FCC play in the West End or even in Newport, Kentucky, which is just across the Ohio river.

It’s possible the infrastructure funding could be available for the West End site (Hamilton County has agreed to pay for a 1,000-space parking garage), but building in such a densely populated area—the club would replace and relocate a high school football stadium—inevitably creates concern among residents. FCC president Jeff Berding, a former Cincinnati city councilman and Bengals executive, has faced a bit of heat at recent school board and community meetings.

Berding was unavailable to comment Friday.

Abbott said there was no handshake deal with FC Cincinnati in place that might allow the club to lobby for the West End site with maximum leverage. FCC already has several advantages in the expansion race, after all. It has the billionaire owner Sacramento needs and the commitment to build a new stadium still absent in Detroit. Even if FCC doesn’t secure the ideal site, it’s still the furthest along among the three finalists.

That doesn’t mean Sacramento has given up. Investor Kevin Nagle was unable to deliver a fully-funded proposal when meeting with MLS in December, and Republic suffered another blow when billionaire technology executive Meg Whitman bowed out as a minority owner soon thereafter. But multiple sources have confirmed a recent report in The Sacramento Bee that Nagle has received expressions of interest from several potential partners, and he said he’s willing to step aside as the lead investor in order to make MLS happen. Nagle’s group already includes the San Francisco 49ers and several investors in the Sacramento Kings.

The league likes the market and Republic’s Railyard stadium plan, and even if FCC is awarded the next franchise, Sacramento immediately becomes a favorite to land No. 27 or 28. A lot of the hard work in California’s capital already has been done. No timeline has been announced for the awarding of those final two expansion slots, but it’s understood that the 12 cities that applied in January 2017 remain the ones under consideration.

If Cincinnati gets its team soon, it also becomes the most likely to kick off in 2019 and bring MLS back to an even number of members. MLS and FCC have looked at what Nippert Stadium might need to host league matches for a season or two, and the team already has some of the required technical infrastructure in place. Garber and David Beckham both said Miami would begin play in 2020. Nashville also isn’t too interested in rushing to take the field as it approaches its inaugural season in the USL (FCC is entering its third).

Los Angeles FC’s arrival this season leaves MLS at 23 teams. The league’s board of governors is scheduled to meet in mid April in Los Angeles.

Yohan Mollo n&#39;a finalement pas été conservé par Vancouver (MLS), après un stage de dix jours. Sa situation se complique.
Foot - Transferts - Yohan Mollo se retrouve dans l'impasse aux États-Unis
Yohan Mollo n'a finalement pas été conservé par Vancouver (MLS), après un stage de dix jours. Sa situation se complique.
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
MLS transaction tracker: All of the latest trades and transfers across the league
Goal keeps you up to date with all the moves going on around Major League Soccer during the offseason
El conjunto de la MLS hizo oficial la incorporación del ay ex jugador del Athletic Club. Firma por dos temporadas con opción a otra más.
Ager Aketxe firma con el Toronto FC
El conjunto de la MLS hizo oficial la incorporación del ay ex jugador del Athletic Club. Firma por dos temporadas con opción a otra más.
<p>Perspective is a curious thing. From one point of view, Sunday’s League Cup final could bring Pep Guardiola his first trophy as manager of Manchester City and herald the start of a great era of silverware. But so high were expectations in November and December, when Man City seemed all but unbeatable, that were the club to lose to Arsenal, it would mean this season risks feeling like a failure, a possible quadruple reduced in the space of a week to a possible double.</p><p>On the same day, two of the other grandees of English football, Manchester United and Chelsea, meet at Old Trafford. It’s not merely a battle between two managers who have been sniping at each other all season; it’s also a clash of two sides whose recent form has been patchy, whose managers are conducting complicated political campaigns and who could conceivably find themselves slipping out of the gilded top four and so missing out on Champions League qualification. Sunday, for varying reasons, is a big day for a lot of Premier League clubs.</p><p>Part of Man City’s problem is that it is too good. It is 16 points clear at the top of the table. Winning the Premier League no longer seems relevant. By the time the title is confirmed, possibly as early as next month, it will have seen inevitable for so long that it will feel as though it’s no longer an achievement. The attention had already moved on. Talk of a possible quadruple was perhaps premature, but given how well Guardiola&#39;s men were playing, it seemed reasonable enough, which is why <a href="https://www.si.com/soccer/2018/02/19/wigan-athletic-manchester-city-fa-cup-will-grigg-goal-video" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Monday’s FA Cup defeat to third-tier Wigan" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Monday’s FA Cup defeat to third-tier Wigan</a> was such a shock.</p><p>Rationally, it should be nothing to worry about. City had most of the ball and most of the chances. Wigan rode its luck to an extent and its goal was the result of a bizarre mistake by Kyle Walker and more leaden-footed goalkeeping from Claudio Bravo, who surely won’t play again this season as long as Ederson remains fit. Perhaps David Silva and Leroy Sane weren’t quite at their sharpest after significant layoffs, but they’ll be back.</p><p>But reason isn’t necessarily the dominant factor. What if Arsenal wins on Sunday? Arsene Wenger’s side remains inconsistent and prone to self-destructive laxity, but that was true last season when it produced one of its inexplicably excellent performances to beat City at Wembley in the FA Cup semifinal. The danger then is that City comes to be regarded as a team of chokers, the sort of reputation that can become self-fulfilling if their players begin to believe it of themselves.</p><p>The biggest question over City, anyway, was whether it is defensively robust enough to cope in the latter stages of the Champions League when it cannot rely on opponents to be blown away or intimidated by its attacking verve. Lose on Sunday, and it could be, slightly ridiculously, that this season ends up being regarded as anti-climactic for City when the truth is that it has played some of the best football the Premier League has ever seen.</p><p>For Man United and Chelsea, the issues are far less elevated. This isn’t about reputation or how history will regard them; it’s about ensuring they finish in the top four. Tottenham sits in fifth, but has picked up more points in 2018 than any other Premier League side, while Liverpool has lost only once in its last 18 league games. A draw could see Chelsea slip out of the top four, while defeat would leave United with just a one-point lead over Spurs in fifth, provided they beat Crystal Palace.</p><p>Perhaps Antonio Conte doesn’t care too much. It’s widely believed <a href="https://www.si.com/soccer/2018/02/20/antonio-conte-chelsea-real-madrid-mls-targeted-allocation-money" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:he will leave at the end of the season anyway" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">he will leave at the end of the season anyway</a>, meaning the main challenge for him is progress in the Champions League which, even if it doesn’t bring glory, might at least challenge the perception that he under-performs in European competition.</p><p>But Mourinho certainly cares. Having already agreed to a contract extension, he has begun <a href="https://www.si.com/soccer/2018/02/21/paul-pogba-jose-mourinho-manchester-united-transfer-raiola-roma-ffp" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:machinating against Paul Pogba" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">machinating against Paul Pogba</a>, much as a new contract at Real Madrid led to Jorge Valdano being ousted as technical director and a civil war with Iker Casillas. That Mourinho is frustrated with Pogba’s tactical ill-discipline has been clear for some time, but the campaign has been ramped up over the past few weeks, with his substitutions against Tottenham and Newcastle, followed by overt criticism after defeat at St James’ Park.</p><p>Leaving Pogba on the bench vs. Sevilla while adopting a 4-3-3, supposedly the shape Pogba believes suits him best (and certainly the shape most outside observers believe suits him best) seems remarkably pointed, even by Mourinho’s standards. With Ander Herrera and Marouane Fellaini both injured, Pogba probably has to play on Sunday, adding another layer of intrigue to an already important game.</p><p>Since Guardiola and Mourinho arrived in England in the summer of 2016, the underlying narrative has been about the two managers. As Guardiola seeks his first trophy with City and Mourinho plays a dangerous game with his most expensive signing, Sunday feels like a crunch day in that story.</p>
Sunday Stakes High for Man City, Arsenal, Man United, Chelsea in Seminal Weekend

Perspective is a curious thing. From one point of view, Sunday’s League Cup final could bring Pep Guardiola his first trophy as manager of Manchester City and herald the start of a great era of silverware. But so high were expectations in November and December, when Man City seemed all but unbeatable, that were the club to lose to Arsenal, it would mean this season risks feeling like a failure, a possible quadruple reduced in the space of a week to a possible double.

On the same day, two of the other grandees of English football, Manchester United and Chelsea, meet at Old Trafford. It’s not merely a battle between two managers who have been sniping at each other all season; it’s also a clash of two sides whose recent form has been patchy, whose managers are conducting complicated political campaigns and who could conceivably find themselves slipping out of the gilded top four and so missing out on Champions League qualification. Sunday, for varying reasons, is a big day for a lot of Premier League clubs.

Part of Man City’s problem is that it is too good. It is 16 points clear at the top of the table. Winning the Premier League no longer seems relevant. By the time the title is confirmed, possibly as early as next month, it will have seen inevitable for so long that it will feel as though it’s no longer an achievement. The attention had already moved on. Talk of a possible quadruple was perhaps premature, but given how well Guardiola's men were playing, it seemed reasonable enough, which is why Monday’s FA Cup defeat to third-tier Wigan was such a shock.

Rationally, it should be nothing to worry about. City had most of the ball and most of the chances. Wigan rode its luck to an extent and its goal was the result of a bizarre mistake by Kyle Walker and more leaden-footed goalkeeping from Claudio Bravo, who surely won’t play again this season as long as Ederson remains fit. Perhaps David Silva and Leroy Sane weren’t quite at their sharpest after significant layoffs, but they’ll be back.

But reason isn’t necessarily the dominant factor. What if Arsenal wins on Sunday? Arsene Wenger’s side remains inconsistent and prone to self-destructive laxity, but that was true last season when it produced one of its inexplicably excellent performances to beat City at Wembley in the FA Cup semifinal. The danger then is that City comes to be regarded as a team of chokers, the sort of reputation that can become self-fulfilling if their players begin to believe it of themselves.

The biggest question over City, anyway, was whether it is defensively robust enough to cope in the latter stages of the Champions League when it cannot rely on opponents to be blown away or intimidated by its attacking verve. Lose on Sunday, and it could be, slightly ridiculously, that this season ends up being regarded as anti-climactic for City when the truth is that it has played some of the best football the Premier League has ever seen.

For Man United and Chelsea, the issues are far less elevated. This isn’t about reputation or how history will regard them; it’s about ensuring they finish in the top four. Tottenham sits in fifth, but has picked up more points in 2018 than any other Premier League side, while Liverpool has lost only once in its last 18 league games. A draw could see Chelsea slip out of the top four, while defeat would leave United with just a one-point lead over Spurs in fifth, provided they beat Crystal Palace.

Perhaps Antonio Conte doesn’t care too much. It’s widely believed he will leave at the end of the season anyway, meaning the main challenge for him is progress in the Champions League which, even if it doesn’t bring glory, might at least challenge the perception that he under-performs in European competition.

But Mourinho certainly cares. Having already agreed to a contract extension, he has begun machinating against Paul Pogba, much as a new contract at Real Madrid led to Jorge Valdano being ousted as technical director and a civil war with Iker Casillas. That Mourinho is frustrated with Pogba’s tactical ill-discipline has been clear for some time, but the campaign has been ramped up over the past few weeks, with his substitutions against Tottenham and Newcastle, followed by overt criticism after defeat at St James’ Park.

Leaving Pogba on the bench vs. Sevilla while adopting a 4-3-3, supposedly the shape Pogba believes suits him best (and certainly the shape most outside observers believe suits him best) seems remarkably pointed, even by Mourinho’s standards. With Ander Herrera and Marouane Fellaini both injured, Pogba probably has to play on Sunday, adding another layer of intrigue to an already important game.

Since Guardiola and Mourinho arrived in England in the summer of 2016, the underlying narrative has been about the two managers. As Guardiola seeks his first trophy with City and Mourinho plays a dangerous game with his most expensive signing, Sunday feels like a crunch day in that story.

After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
FC Dallas 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
After missing the playoffs in 2017, FC Dallas hopes additions at the back and on the wing get it back in the MLS Cup hunt
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign
Minnesota United 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign
Minnesota United 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign
Minnesota United 2018 season preview: Roster, projected lineup, schedule, national TV and more
Following a rough debut season, the Loons will look for improvement in their sophomore MLS campaign

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