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Unai Emery said: "This is a big team, with great players. We think we need change, little things, a few players. I want to speak individually with all the players face to face."
Premier League: Manager Unai Emery issues warning for underperforming stars, promises 'new future' for Arsenal
Unai Emery said: "This is a big team, with great players. We think we need change, little things, a few players. I want to speak individually with all the players face to face."
Stressing that they needed one of the top four batsmen to stay at the crease till the end, skipper Ajinkya Rahane said with so many wickets in hand, Rajasthan Royals should have won against the Kolkata Knight Riders in the Indian Premier League (IPL) Eliminator here.
RR Needed Someone to Bat Through Chase: Ajinkya Rahane
Stressing that they needed one of the top four batsmen to stay at the crease till the end, skipper Ajinkya Rahane said with so many wickets in hand, Rajasthan Royals should have won against the Kolkata Knight Riders in the Indian Premier League (IPL) Eliminator here.
The Indian Premier League match between Chennai and Hyderabad on Tuesday set a new global benchmark with 8.26 million concurrent viewers logging onto Hotstar, the chief executive of the video streaming platform told Reuters.
IPL Sets New Benchmark with Hotstar Streaming Record in CSK-SRH Tie
The Indian Premier League match between Chennai and Hyderabad on Tuesday set a new global benchmark with 8.26 million concurrent viewers logging onto Hotstar, the chief executive of the video streaming platform told Reuters.
The Indian Premier League match between Chennai and Hyderabad on Tuesday set a new global benchmark with 8.26 million concurrent viewers logging onto Hotstar
Hotstar establishes a new streaming record with IPL 2018 getting 8.26 mn concurrent viewers
The Indian Premier League match between Chennai and Hyderabad on Tuesday set a new global benchmark with 8.26 million concurrent viewers logging onto Hotstar
FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017 file photo, Liverpool fans at the Kop sing "You'll Never Walk Alone" during the English Premier League soccer match between Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur at Anfield, Liverpool, England. The famous tune will be sung Saturday by 16,000-plus Liverpool fans at Olympic Stadium in Kiev, Ukraine. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017 file photo, Liverpool fans at the Kop sing "You'll Never Walk Alone" during the English Premier League soccer match between Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur at Anfield, Liverpool, England. The famous tune will be sung Saturday by 16,000-plus Liverpool fans at Olympic Stadium in Kiev, Ukraine. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2017 file photo, Liverpool fans at the Kop sing "You'll Never Walk Alone" during the English Premier League soccer match between Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur at Anfield, Liverpool, England. The famous tune will be sung Saturday by 16,000-plus Liverpool fans at Olympic Stadium in Kiev, Ukraine. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira, File)
Rondon scored 24 goals in three Premier League seasons at West Brom, almost a quarter of the 104 produced by the Baggies.
Rondon wanted by Atleti, Inter Milan, and West Ham
Rondon scored 24 goals in three Premier League seasons at West Brom, almost a quarter of the 104 produced by the Baggies.
Rondon scored 24 goals in three Premier League seasons at West Brom, almost a quarter of the 104 produced by the Baggies.
Rondon wanted by Atleti, Inter Milan, and West Ham
Rondon scored 24 goals in three Premier League seasons at West Brom, almost a quarter of the 104 produced by the Baggies.
The latest gossip from around the Premier League.
Transfer Rumors: Seri to Arsenal; Vagnoman to Chelsea
The latest gossip from around the Premier League.
The latest gossip from around the Premier League.
Transfer Rumors: Seri to Arsenal; Vagnoman to Chelsea
The latest gossip from around the Premier League.
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Man City near £60m Mahrez deal
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Soccer Football - Premier League - Chelsea vs Liverpool - Stamford Bridge, London, Britain - May 6, 2018 Liverpool's Trent Alexander-Arnold REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Premier League - Chelsea vs Liverpool
Soccer Football - Premier League - Chelsea vs Liverpool - Stamford Bridge, London, Britain - May 6, 2018 Liverpool's Trent Alexander-Arnold REUTERS/Eddie Keogh
Unai Emery has promised that his Arsenal team will be fearless in their pursuit of restoring the club to the top of English football, despite chief executive Ivan Gazidis warning fans to be patient. Arsenal have handed Emery a three-year contract to succeed Arsene Wenger and the Spaniard will have to work with a strict £50 million transfer budget. Emery has admitted there is unlikely to be an overhaul of the squad which finished 37 points and five places behind Premier League champions Manchester City, but he is confident he can turn them into trophy hunters again. Asked whether Arsenal could catch City next season, Emery said: “That is our objective. Arsenal is a club with fantastic personality and identity, and I believe and the club has shown me that they believe. It is about showing that personality and showing the stature of this football club. “What we want to do is not fear any team, neither here in the Premier League nor in Europe, and our objective is to be among the best and to beat the best. “The target is to be a candidate and to challenge for the title. It is important for the club after two years outside of the Champions League to work this way. We need to be in the best club in the Premier League and in the world.” Gazidis is confident he has the right man to reunite the club and bring success but is aware progress may be slow. “I think we need to understand that success isn’t instant,” said Gazidis. “So, this is going to be a process. As Unai said, day after day you try to improve a little bit, you try to move forward. That’s what we have to do. “We have to work hard, we have to work well together and take this step by step. There are so many stories in sport of people who achieve things that were not believed possible at the beginning of the journey, because they focused on that process of just getting a little better every day. “It’s not going to be instant. So, this kind of significant change in a club doesn’t deliver instant success, nobody is naive enough to think that. But I do think the new way of working, the new energy, stimulates the environment and I think it’s going to be very positive. I could not possibly feel better about this appointment.” Emery with Ivan Gazidis at the Emirates Credit: Getty images Handed the title of head coach, rather than manager, Emery will have to work closely with head of recruitment Sven Mislintat over transfers, but he is not expecting to make big changes to the squad. “We think we need change, very little, a little bit with the players,” said Emery. “I know all the players, I think they are very important and I want to be with them. But I want to speak to them individually and to speak with them face to face. “I think it is about having belief in the players. We will have time to speak about where we need to improve, we have already touched on that a little bit. We do need to go into more detail but we have got that strong nucleus, if you like. “I’m the type of coach who has always worked really hard, not because I do it better than anyone else but because that is what I believe the most important thing is. “I’m very demanding of myself, I’m passionate and I really want to transmit that to the people around me – that we can and must improve in the future.” Unai Emery: what style can Arsenal expect from their new manager? Emery wasted no time in conveying his message within the club, as he addressed his new staff for the first time over a conference call. Ahead of his first press conference, Emery, together with Gazidis, told members of staff that he wanted to create a new history and a great future for Arsenal. Expanding on that point in front of the media, Emery said: “I think the most important thing is to connect with people and have those personal relationships. Heart to heart, head to head. The heart transmits emotion, the head transmits the intelligence. “So, it’s really important to have that connection both on a personal and collective level. What you are looking for is a shared experience. I’m a coach that has come from the second division, gone through to the first division, coached at Paris Saint-Germain and now at Arsenal. And, really, the essence of it all is people.”
Unai Emery says he will get 'fearless' Arsenal back on top
Unai Emery has promised that his Arsenal team will be fearless in their pursuit of restoring the club to the top of English football, despite chief executive Ivan Gazidis warning fans to be patient. Arsenal have handed Emery a three-year contract to succeed Arsene Wenger and the Spaniard will have to work with a strict £50 million transfer budget. Emery has admitted there is unlikely to be an overhaul of the squad which finished 37 points and five places behind Premier League champions Manchester City, but he is confident he can turn them into trophy hunters again. Asked whether Arsenal could catch City next season, Emery said: “That is our objective. Arsenal is a club with fantastic personality and identity, and I believe and the club has shown me that they believe. It is about showing that personality and showing the stature of this football club. “What we want to do is not fear any team, neither here in the Premier League nor in Europe, and our objective is to be among the best and to beat the best. “The target is to be a candidate and to challenge for the title. It is important for the club after two years outside of the Champions League to work this way. We need to be in the best club in the Premier League and in the world.” Gazidis is confident he has the right man to reunite the club and bring success but is aware progress may be slow. “I think we need to understand that success isn’t instant,” said Gazidis. “So, this is going to be a process. As Unai said, day after day you try to improve a little bit, you try to move forward. That’s what we have to do. “We have to work hard, we have to work well together and take this step by step. There are so many stories in sport of people who achieve things that were not believed possible at the beginning of the journey, because they focused on that process of just getting a little better every day. “It’s not going to be instant. So, this kind of significant change in a club doesn’t deliver instant success, nobody is naive enough to think that. But I do think the new way of working, the new energy, stimulates the environment and I think it’s going to be very positive. I could not possibly feel better about this appointment.” Emery with Ivan Gazidis at the Emirates Credit: Getty images Handed the title of head coach, rather than manager, Emery will have to work closely with head of recruitment Sven Mislintat over transfers, but he is not expecting to make big changes to the squad. “We think we need change, very little, a little bit with the players,” said Emery. “I know all the players, I think they are very important and I want to be with them. But I want to speak to them individually and to speak with them face to face. “I think it is about having belief in the players. We will have time to speak about where we need to improve, we have already touched on that a little bit. We do need to go into more detail but we have got that strong nucleus, if you like. “I’m the type of coach who has always worked really hard, not because I do it better than anyone else but because that is what I believe the most important thing is. “I’m very demanding of myself, I’m passionate and I really want to transmit that to the people around me – that we can and must improve in the future.” Unai Emery: what style can Arsenal expect from their new manager? Emery wasted no time in conveying his message within the club, as he addressed his new staff for the first time over a conference call. Ahead of his first press conference, Emery, together with Gazidis, told members of staff that he wanted to create a new history and a great future for Arsenal. Expanding on that point in front of the media, Emery said: “I think the most important thing is to connect with people and have those personal relationships. Heart to heart, head to head. The heart transmits emotion, the head transmits the intelligence. “So, it’s really important to have that connection both on a personal and collective level. What you are looking for is a shared experience. I’m a coach that has come from the second division, gone through to the first division, coached at Paris Saint-Germain and now at Arsenal. And, really, the essence of it all is people.”
Unai Emery has promised that his Arsenal team will be fearless in their pursuit of restoring the club to the top of English football, despite chief executive Ivan Gazidis warning fans to be patient. Arsenal have handed Emery a three-year contract to succeed Arsene Wenger and the Spaniard will have to work with a strict £50 million transfer budget. Emery has admitted there is unlikely to be an overhaul of the squad which finished 37 points and five places behind Premier League champions Manchester City, but he is confident he can turn them into trophy hunters again. Asked whether Arsenal could catch City next season, Emery said: “That is our objective. Arsenal is a club with fantastic personality and identity, and I believe and the club has shown me that they believe. It is about showing that personality and showing the stature of this football club. “What we want to do is not fear any team, neither here in the Premier League nor in Europe, and our objective is to be among the best and to beat the best. “The target is to be a candidate and to challenge for the title. It is important for the club after two years outside of the Champions League to work this way. We need to be in the best club in the Premier League and in the world.” Gazidis is confident he has the right man to reunite the club and bring success but is aware progress may be slow. “I think we need to understand that success isn’t instant,” said Gazidis. “So, this is going to be a process. As Unai said, day after day you try to improve a little bit, you try to move forward. That’s what we have to do. “We have to work hard, we have to work well together and take this step by step. There are so many stories in sport of people who achieve things that were not believed possible at the beginning of the journey, because they focused on that process of just getting a little better every day. “It’s not going to be instant. So, this kind of significant change in a club doesn’t deliver instant success, nobody is naive enough to think that. But I do think the new way of working, the new energy, stimulates the environment and I think it’s going to be very positive. I could not possibly feel better about this appointment.” Emery with Ivan Gazidis at the Emirates Credit: Getty images Handed the title of head coach, rather than manager, Emery will have to work closely with head of recruitment Sven Mislintat over transfers, but he is not expecting to make big changes to the squad. “We think we need change, very little, a little bit with the players,” said Emery. “I know all the players, I think they are very important and I want to be with them. But I want to speak to them individually and to speak with them face to face. “I think it is about having belief in the players. We will have time to speak about where we need to improve, we have already touched on that a little bit. We do need to go into more detail but we have got that strong nucleus, if you like. “I’m the type of coach who has always worked really hard, not because I do it better than anyone else but because that is what I believe the most important thing is. “I’m very demanding of myself, I’m passionate and I really want to transmit that to the people around me – that we can and must improve in the future.” Unai Emery: what style can Arsenal expect from their new manager? Emery wasted no time in conveying his message within the club, as he addressed his new staff for the first time over a conference call. Ahead of his first press conference, Emery, together with Gazidis, told members of staff that he wanted to create a new history and a great future for Arsenal. Expanding on that point in front of the media, Emery said: “I think the most important thing is to connect with people and have those personal relationships. Heart to heart, head to head. The heart transmits emotion, the head transmits the intelligence. “So, it’s really important to have that connection both on a personal and collective level. What you are looking for is a shared experience. I’m a coach that has come from the second division, gone through to the first division, coached at Paris Saint-Germain and now at Arsenal. And, really, the essence of it all is people.”
Unai Emery says he will get 'fearless' Arsenal back on top
Unai Emery has promised that his Arsenal team will be fearless in their pursuit of restoring the club to the top of English football, despite chief executive Ivan Gazidis warning fans to be patient. Arsenal have handed Emery a three-year contract to succeed Arsene Wenger and the Spaniard will have to work with a strict £50 million transfer budget. Emery has admitted there is unlikely to be an overhaul of the squad which finished 37 points and five places behind Premier League champions Manchester City, but he is confident he can turn them into trophy hunters again. Asked whether Arsenal could catch City next season, Emery said: “That is our objective. Arsenal is a club with fantastic personality and identity, and I believe and the club has shown me that they believe. It is about showing that personality and showing the stature of this football club. “What we want to do is not fear any team, neither here in the Premier League nor in Europe, and our objective is to be among the best and to beat the best. “The target is to be a candidate and to challenge for the title. It is important for the club after two years outside of the Champions League to work this way. We need to be in the best club in the Premier League and in the world.” Gazidis is confident he has the right man to reunite the club and bring success but is aware progress may be slow. “I think we need to understand that success isn’t instant,” said Gazidis. “So, this is going to be a process. As Unai said, day after day you try to improve a little bit, you try to move forward. That’s what we have to do. “We have to work hard, we have to work well together and take this step by step. There are so many stories in sport of people who achieve things that were not believed possible at the beginning of the journey, because they focused on that process of just getting a little better every day. “It’s not going to be instant. So, this kind of significant change in a club doesn’t deliver instant success, nobody is naive enough to think that. But I do think the new way of working, the new energy, stimulates the environment and I think it’s going to be very positive. I could not possibly feel better about this appointment.” Emery with Ivan Gazidis at the Emirates Credit: Getty images Handed the title of head coach, rather than manager, Emery will have to work closely with head of recruitment Sven Mislintat over transfers, but he is not expecting to make big changes to the squad. “We think we need change, very little, a little bit with the players,” said Emery. “I know all the players, I think they are very important and I want to be with them. But I want to speak to them individually and to speak with them face to face. “I think it is about having belief in the players. We will have time to speak about where we need to improve, we have already touched on that a little bit. We do need to go into more detail but we have got that strong nucleus, if you like. “I’m the type of coach who has always worked really hard, not because I do it better than anyone else but because that is what I believe the most important thing is. “I’m very demanding of myself, I’m passionate and I really want to transmit that to the people around me – that we can and must improve in the future.” Unai Emery: what style can Arsenal expect from their new manager? Emery wasted no time in conveying his message within the club, as he addressed his new staff for the first time over a conference call. Ahead of his first press conference, Emery, together with Gazidis, told members of staff that he wanted to create a new history and a great future for Arsenal. Expanding on that point in front of the media, Emery said: “I think the most important thing is to connect with people and have those personal relationships. Heart to heart, head to head. The heart transmits emotion, the head transmits the intelligence. “So, it’s really important to have that connection both on a personal and collective level. What you are looking for is a shared experience. I’m a coach that has come from the second division, gone through to the first division, coached at Paris Saint-Germain and now at Arsenal. And, really, the essence of it all is people.”
Slavisa Jokanovic, the Fulham manager, has insisted he has not thought about his future beyond Saturday’s Championship play-off final, despite speculation that a string of key figures will leave the club if they cannot seal promotion to the Premier League. Jokanovic, who has turned Fulham into one of the Championship’s most attractive sides, has been linked with a move and is likely to be in demand this summer. Speaking ahead of the match against Aston Villa at Wembley, Jokanovic refused to discuss either his future or the prospect of key players leaving. Tom Cairney, Fulham’s captain, warned this month that the club needed to be in the Premier League next season if they wanted to keep the team together. Cairney has been linked with a move to West Ham United, while Ryan Sessegnon and Ryan Fredericks have also been targeted by top-flight clubs. Jokanovic, who has one year remaining on his deal, said: “I have a contract and that’s it. I am not thinking about the future. This game is so huge that I do not know what I am going to do on Sunday morning. “To be honest, I do not care. I am not thinking about this. I am only thinking about the job ahead of us. We want to fight to bring Fulham to the place we believe they belong.” The 49-year-old added that he believed Fulham could “dominate” Steve Bruce’s Villa with their high-intensity, possession-based style of football. Tom Cairney wants to be playing in the Premier League Credit: pa Fulham were defeated 2-1 at Villa Park in October, but won 2-0 when the sides met again in February. Jokanovic said his players would attempt to target Villa’s John Terry, the 37-year-old centre-back who played alongside Jokanovic at Chelsea from 2000 to 2002. “We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players,” said Jokanovic. “I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it.” In Terry and James Chester, his defensive partner, Villa boast an experienced back-line, as well as former Premier League players Mile Jedinak, Glenn Whelan, Robert Snodgrass and Alan Hutton. Jokanovic, however, believes his younger side, who enjoyed a 23-game unbeaten run during the regular season, will have the required energy to overcome the more wily Villa, who finished fourth in the Championship, one place behind Fulham. “When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past,” Jokanovic said. “Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. “We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything.”
Slavisa Jokanovic unfazed by talk of Fulham players leaving if they do not get promoted
Slavisa Jokanovic, the Fulham manager, has insisted he has not thought about his future beyond Saturday’s Championship play-off final, despite speculation that a string of key figures will leave the club if they cannot seal promotion to the Premier League. Jokanovic, who has turned Fulham into one of the Championship’s most attractive sides, has been linked with a move and is likely to be in demand this summer. Speaking ahead of the match against Aston Villa at Wembley, Jokanovic refused to discuss either his future or the prospect of key players leaving. Tom Cairney, Fulham’s captain, warned this month that the club needed to be in the Premier League next season if they wanted to keep the team together. Cairney has been linked with a move to West Ham United, while Ryan Sessegnon and Ryan Fredericks have also been targeted by top-flight clubs. Jokanovic, who has one year remaining on his deal, said: “I have a contract and that’s it. I am not thinking about the future. This game is so huge that I do not know what I am going to do on Sunday morning. “To be honest, I do not care. I am not thinking about this. I am only thinking about the job ahead of us. We want to fight to bring Fulham to the place we believe they belong.” The 49-year-old added that he believed Fulham could “dominate” Steve Bruce’s Villa with their high-intensity, possession-based style of football. Tom Cairney wants to be playing in the Premier League Credit: pa Fulham were defeated 2-1 at Villa Park in October, but won 2-0 when the sides met again in February. Jokanovic said his players would attempt to target Villa’s John Terry, the 37-year-old centre-back who played alongside Jokanovic at Chelsea from 2000 to 2002. “We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players,” said Jokanovic. “I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it.” In Terry and James Chester, his defensive partner, Villa boast an experienced back-line, as well as former Premier League players Mile Jedinak, Glenn Whelan, Robert Snodgrass and Alan Hutton. Jokanovic, however, believes his younger side, who enjoyed a 23-game unbeaten run during the regular season, will have the required energy to overcome the more wily Villa, who finished fourth in the Championship, one place behind Fulham. “When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past,” Jokanovic said. “Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. “We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything.”
Slavisa Jokanovic, the Fulham manager, has insisted he has not thought about his future beyond Saturday’s Championship play-off final, despite speculation that a string of key figures will leave the club if they cannot seal promotion to the Premier League. Jokanovic, who has turned Fulham into one of the Championship’s most attractive sides, has been linked with a move and is likely to be in demand this summer. Speaking ahead of the match against Aston Villa at Wembley, Jokanovic refused to discuss either his future or the prospect of key players leaving. Tom Cairney, Fulham’s captain, warned this month that the club needed to be in the Premier League next season if they wanted to keep the team together. Cairney has been linked with a move to West Ham United, while Ryan Sessegnon and Ryan Fredericks have also been targeted by top-flight clubs. Jokanovic, who has one year remaining on his deal, said: “I have a contract and that’s it. I am not thinking about the future. This game is so huge that I do not know what I am going to do on Sunday morning. “To be honest, I do not care. I am not thinking about this. I am only thinking about the job ahead of us. We want to fight to bring Fulham to the place we believe they belong.” The 49-year-old added that he believed Fulham could “dominate” Steve Bruce’s Villa with their high-intensity, possession-based style of football. Tom Cairney wants to be playing in the Premier League Credit: pa Fulham were defeated 2-1 at Villa Park in October, but won 2-0 when the sides met again in February. Jokanovic said his players would attempt to target Villa’s John Terry, the 37-year-old centre-back who played alongside Jokanovic at Chelsea from 2000 to 2002. “We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players,” said Jokanovic. “I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it.” In Terry and James Chester, his defensive partner, Villa boast an experienced back-line, as well as former Premier League players Mile Jedinak, Glenn Whelan, Robert Snodgrass and Alan Hutton. Jokanovic, however, believes his younger side, who enjoyed a 23-game unbeaten run during the regular season, will have the required energy to overcome the more wily Villa, who finished fourth in the Championship, one place behind Fulham. “When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past,” Jokanovic said. “Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. “We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything.”
Slavisa Jokanovic unfazed by talk of Fulham players leaving if they do not get promoted
Slavisa Jokanovic, the Fulham manager, has insisted he has not thought about his future beyond Saturday’s Championship play-off final, despite speculation that a string of key figures will leave the club if they cannot seal promotion to the Premier League. Jokanovic, who has turned Fulham into one of the Championship’s most attractive sides, has been linked with a move and is likely to be in demand this summer. Speaking ahead of the match against Aston Villa at Wembley, Jokanovic refused to discuss either his future or the prospect of key players leaving. Tom Cairney, Fulham’s captain, warned this month that the club needed to be in the Premier League next season if they wanted to keep the team together. Cairney has been linked with a move to West Ham United, while Ryan Sessegnon and Ryan Fredericks have also been targeted by top-flight clubs. Jokanovic, who has one year remaining on his deal, said: “I have a contract and that’s it. I am not thinking about the future. This game is so huge that I do not know what I am going to do on Sunday morning. “To be honest, I do not care. I am not thinking about this. I am only thinking about the job ahead of us. We want to fight to bring Fulham to the place we believe they belong.” The 49-year-old added that he believed Fulham could “dominate” Steve Bruce’s Villa with their high-intensity, possession-based style of football. Tom Cairney wants to be playing in the Premier League Credit: pa Fulham were defeated 2-1 at Villa Park in October, but won 2-0 when the sides met again in February. Jokanovic said his players would attempt to target Villa’s John Terry, the 37-year-old centre-back who played alongside Jokanovic at Chelsea from 2000 to 2002. “We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players,” said Jokanovic. “I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it.” In Terry and James Chester, his defensive partner, Villa boast an experienced back-line, as well as former Premier League players Mile Jedinak, Glenn Whelan, Robert Snodgrass and Alan Hutton. Jokanovic, however, believes his younger side, who enjoyed a 23-game unbeaten run during the regular season, will have the required energy to overcome the more wily Villa, who finished fourth in the Championship, one place behind Fulham. “When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past,” Jokanovic said. “Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. “We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything.”
Cricketer Andre Russell plays a shot during an Indian Premier League game in West Bengal (AFP Photo/Dibyangshu SARKAR)
Swing
Cricketer Andre Russell plays a shot during an Indian Premier League game in West Bengal (AFP Photo/Dibyangshu SARKAR)
Liverpool and Real Madrid put on a Premier League versus La Liga showdown in Ukraine this weekend.
Three key battles for Champions League Final
Liverpool and Real Madrid put on a Premier League versus La Liga showdown in Ukraine this weekend.
Liverpool and Real Madrid put on a Premier League versus La Liga showdown in Ukraine this weekend.
Three key battles for Champions League Final
Liverpool and Real Madrid put on a Premier League versus La Liga showdown in Ukraine this weekend.
Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) skipper Dinesh Karthik said they were under pressure in the Eliminator against Rajasthan Royals but eventually came up trumps to win by 25 runs and make Qualifier 2 of the Indian Premier League (IPL) here on Wednesday.
IPL 2018: Bowlers, Fielders Picked Up Their Game, Says Karthik
Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) skipper Dinesh Karthik said they were under pressure in the Eliminator against Rajasthan Royals but eventually came up trumps to win by 25 runs and make Qualifier 2 of the Indian Premier League (IPL) here on Wednesday.
Arsenal chief executive Ivan Gazidis welcomed Unai Emery as his club's manager and claimed the Gunners' job is the most attractive in world football.
Premier League: Arsenal manager's job most attractive in football, says CEO Ivan Gazidis
Arsenal chief executive Ivan Gazidis welcomed Unai Emery as his club's manager and claimed the Gunners' job is the most attractive in world football.
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Yaya Toure open to moving to Man Utd where he could 'teach Paul Pogba some things'
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Yaya Toure open to moving to Man Utd where he could 'teach Paul Pogba some things'
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Yaya Toure open to moving to Man Utd where he could 'teach Paul Pogba some things'
Yaya Toure believes he would be a good “teacher” to Paul Pogba as the outgoing Manchester City midfielder admitted he would not rule out a move to Old Trafford. Toure is a free agent this summer after Pep Guardiola opted not to renew his contract at the Premier League champions but the Ivorian midfielder has indicated that he would not be averse to making the switch across the city to rivals Manchester United. Jose Mourinho is in the market for at least one central midfielder following the retirement of Michael Carrick, with United working on a deal for Shakhtar Donetsk’s Fred. But Mourinho could be forced into the market for a second midfielder if Marouane Fellaini, who has attracted interest from AC Milan, fails to agree a new contract. With United already targeting two full backs, a centre-half and a winger, Toure would be a relatively cheap midfield option for Mourinho. And the 35-year-old says he would be open to the transfer, despite his allegiance to City where he spent eight years, as he weighs up his next career move. Maroane Fellaini could leave Untied this summer, too Credit: AFP “Yeah he just left,” Toure said about Carrick’s retirement at United. “Let’s see, let’s see. I don’t rule big teams out. The big teams are very important for me. What they want to achieve, the way they want to go, for me is very important. “I want to go somewhere I can win and achieve. It’s going to be hard one day to play against City, but I have to do that. It is part of my job. I’ve been playing football for such a long time, I’m no good in the office or something else. I am good in football. “To see myself at a different club is going to be difficult. I have been such a big part of City for such a long time now. I just want to say that definitely I will continue to play at a high level – Champions League or Europa League. I want to play two more years. They have to be in the higher level and then I can do something else.” Toure, who is keen to stay in England despite offers from China, the Middle East and America, believes he could also help improve Pogba, whose future at Old Trafford is uncertain after a deeply disappointing second season at Old Trafford. Pogba’s erratic form since the turn of the year has coincided with the Frenchman’s increasingly strained relationship with Mourinho but Toure believes he could be a mentor to the United midfielder. Pogba has failed to fully convince at United Credit: Reuters “I love Paul Pogba,” Toure told the Manchester Evening News. “It’s difficult because of the way the media has treated him. We don’t have the same characteristics because for me I was involved in all the balls, I ran everywhere. I liked that. I was prepared for that. I was working for that for a long time. “When I was in the academy in Africa I had to run everywhere, get box to box in 50 seconds. “Pogba is the same size, power – but different in the way he wants to go, technically as well, the ability to score goals as well. It is a player I want to play with, to be honest, just to teach him some things. “Pogba is a great player. He’s a fantastic player. He’s a little bit young at the moment. “Criticism is a part of life. If they criticise you it’s because they want you to be good or be better. I’ve been criticised and I love to be criticised. I like it. I don’t mind if people talk about me – it’s good. It means I have to achieve, I have to be better. Even if you continue to be at the peak of your game, sometimes they are going to find something to tell you. It’s part of life. We have to deal with that.” Asked if he genuinely saw his next move at United, Toure sounded a note of caution. “No, no, no, no. The fans are going to kill me!” he laughed.
Kolkata Knight Riders snatched victory from the jaws of defeat as they came out on top against Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League (IPL) Eliminator by 25 runs at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on Wednesday.
IPL 2018: Kolkata Register Convincing Win Over Rajasthan, To Meet Hyderabad for a Place in Final
Kolkata Knight Riders snatched victory from the jaws of defeat as they came out on top against Rajasthan Royals in the Indian Premier League (IPL) Eliminator by 25 runs at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata on Wednesday.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Lucas Perez de retour à Arsenal ?
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
<p>Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club&#39;s former coach Arsene Wenger.</p>
Arsenal appoint former PSG coach Unai Emery as Wenger successor

Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club's former coach Arsene Wenger.

<p>Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club&#39;s former coach Arsene Wenger.</p>
Arsenal appoint former PSG coach Unai Emery as Wenger successor

Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club's former coach Arsene Wenger.

<p>Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club&#39;s former coach Arsene Wenger.</p>
Arsenal appoint former PSG coach Unai Emery as Wenger successor

Arsenal announces former Paris Saint-Germain coach Unai Emery as their new boss, handing him the daunting task of revitalising a club that has slipped well behind their Premier League rivals. Emery took the opportunity to thank English club's former coach Arsene Wenger.

Manuel Pellegrini was confirmed as Hammers boss on Tuesday and immediately targeted &quot;four or five&quot; new signings.
Premier League: West Ham United promise new manager Manuel Pellegrini 'major funds' to rebuild side
Manuel Pellegrini was confirmed as Hammers boss on Tuesday and immediately targeted "four or five" new signings.
The Porcupine Warriors claimed full points on Wednesday as the league leaders suffered a setback in Berekum
Matchday 13 wrap: Kotoko win as Medeama fall on Ghana Premier League return
The Porcupine Warriors claimed full points on Wednesday as the league leaders suffered a setback in Berekum
Everton’s new director of football Marcel Brands has vowed to appoint a ‘modern’ manager as the club closes in on Marco Silva. Setting out his vision for Goodison Park, Brands says confirming the replacement to Sam Allardyce is his priority, and he wants a manager who ‘wants to work with young players’. “The priority in the first month is the first team and to be ready for the start of the next Premier League season,” said Brands. “The first thing is a new manager. I think it is important that he wants to work in the new philosophy, the new strategy of how we want to work with a director of football. I think it is important that he creates the environment for the long-term, and I think it is important that he is a modern coach. If you think about what Everton’s plans are, I think a modern coach will fit into that profile. “Then his philosophy and how he wants to play is important. I think it has to be a coach who wants to work with young players.” Premier League club-by-club review Brands will be holding talks with Ademola Lookman&#39;s representatives in an effort to convince the exciting forward his future is at Goodison Park rather than RB Leipzig, where he enjoyed a successful loan period. “I have watched several Everton games and I have looked at the players. I also saw some who were on loan to other clubs but if we are going to take decisions about players it is important the manager is involved because he is going to work with them every day,” said Brands. “I will take care of the long-term strategy but the first job now is to find a manager as soon as possible and straight away go to work with the squad.”
New Everton chief vows to appoint 'modern' manager as club closes in on Marco Silva
Everton’s new director of football Marcel Brands has vowed to appoint a ‘modern’ manager as the club closes in on Marco Silva. Setting out his vision for Goodison Park, Brands says confirming the replacement to Sam Allardyce is his priority, and he wants a manager who ‘wants to work with young players’. “The priority in the first month is the first team and to be ready for the start of the next Premier League season,” said Brands. “The first thing is a new manager. I think it is important that he wants to work in the new philosophy, the new strategy of how we want to work with a director of football. I think it is important that he creates the environment for the long-term, and I think it is important that he is a modern coach. If you think about what Everton’s plans are, I think a modern coach will fit into that profile. “Then his philosophy and how he wants to play is important. I think it has to be a coach who wants to work with young players.” Premier League club-by-club review Brands will be holding talks with Ademola Lookman's representatives in an effort to convince the exciting forward his future is at Goodison Park rather than RB Leipzig, where he enjoyed a successful loan period. “I have watched several Everton games and I have looked at the players. I also saw some who were on loan to other clubs but if we are going to take decisions about players it is important the manager is involved because he is going to work with them every day,” said Brands. “I will take care of the long-term strategy but the first job now is to find a manager as soon as possible and straight away go to work with the squad.”
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L&#39;ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
Foot - ANG - Arsenal : Emery «Ce challenge est un rêve»
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L'ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L&#39;ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
Foot - ANG - Arsenal : Emery «Ce challenge est un rêve»
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L'ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L'ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
Foot - ANG - Arsenal : Emery «Ce challenge est un rêve»
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L'ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L&#39;ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
Foot - ANG - Arsenal : Emery «Ce challenge est un rêve»
VIDEO PREMIER LEAGUE - Unai Emery, nommé à la tête d?Arsenal, a été présenté ce mercredi à la presse. L'ancien entraineur du Paris-SG a partagé son bonheur de succéder à Arsène Wenger.
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
IPL 2018 Eliminator: A do-or-die game for KKR and RR
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
IPL 2018 Eliminator: A do-or-die game for KKR and RR
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
IPL 2018 Eliminator: A do-or-die game for KKR and RR
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
IPL 2018 Eliminator: A do-or-die game for KKR and RR
The Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) are all set to play the Rajasthan Royals (RR) in the eliminator of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 on Wednesday. The match is scheduled to be played at the Eden Gardens in Kolkata which has been the fortress for KKR Captain Dinesh Karthik and team. This is the last chance for both the sides to get a step closer to the finale. The Knights comparatively look strong on-paper while the Royals have been extremely lucky as far as their entry into the playoffs is concerned. While the losing team will be ousted from the tournament, the winner will later face the Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) on May 25 in the qualifier 2.
DC United coach Ben Olsen confirmed earlier this month that the club were interested in bringing Rooney to America but said the deal is not done.
Premier League: Everton's Wayne Rooney in talks to join MLS side DC United, confirms club
DC United coach Ben Olsen confirmed earlier this month that the club were interested in bringing Rooney to America but said the deal is not done.
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
IPL Final Fixed? CSK v/s KKR promo goes viral, Twitterati Fuming
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
IPL Final Fixed? CSK v/s KKR promo goes viral, Twitterati Fuming
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
IPL Final Fixed? CSK v/s KKR promo goes viral, Twitterati Fuming
Chennai Super Kings have already booked their place in the final of the Indian Premier League while Sunerisers and Knight Riders will battle it in the second qualifier later today to book their date with Supers Kings at Wankade for the ultimate prize.
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: &quot;There are places I remember all my life. I know I&#39;ll often stop and think about them.&quot; My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool&#39;s players after the &#39;Miracle of Istanbul&#39; Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
The Champions League changed my life - it can do the same for this Liverpool team
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: "There are places I remember all my life. I know I'll often stop and think about them." My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool's players after the 'Miracle of Istanbul' Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: &quot;There are places I remember all my life. I know I&#39;ll often stop and think about them.&quot; My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool&#39;s players after the &#39;Miracle of Istanbul&#39; Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
The Champions League changed my life - it can do the same for this Liverpool team
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: "There are places I remember all my life. I know I'll often stop and think about them." My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool's players after the 'Miracle of Istanbul' Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: &quot;There are places I remember all my life. I know I&#39;ll often stop and think about them.&quot; My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool&#39;s players after the &#39;Miracle of Istanbul&#39; Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
The Champions League changed my life - it can do the same for this Liverpool team
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: "There are places I remember all my life. I know I'll often stop and think about them." My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool's players after the 'Miracle of Istanbul' Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: &quot;There are places I remember all my life. I know I&#39;ll often stop and think about them.&quot; My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool&#39;s players after the &#39;Miracle of Istanbul&#39; Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
The Champions League changed my life - it can do the same for this Liverpool team
I need only talk about the venue and the memories come pouring back. Istanbul. Say the word at Anfield and that is enough. It is the same for Paris and Rome. To some they conjure images of landmarks from Europe’s greatest cities. For Liverpool supporters these locations are inseparable from the pictures of Emlyn Hughes, Phil Thompson, Graeme Souness and Steven Gerrard lifting the European Cup. I played 737 games for Liverpool. No matter where I go, supporters ask about one. My career – and that of each of my teammates on that glorious evening in the Ataturk Stadium - is defined by victory over AC Milan in 2005. Everything I aspired to be as a footballer was geared towards preparing me for that moment. Everything I aspired to after was about maintaining the standard that helped achieve that ambition. The reputation of those of us who won that night is bonded for eternity. Many years ago I watched a documentary about the British and Irish Lions touring South Africa in 1997. Sir Ian McGeechan was speaking to his squad before the second Test, and the words he delivered resonate when I think of the Champions League final. Carragher (L) celebrates Liverpool winning the Champions League in 2005 Credit: Getty Images “There are days like this. Many players never have it,” he said. “It is special. These are the days you never believe will come again. As you meet each other in the street in 30 years time, there will just be a look. No words. Just a look. You’ll know how special some days in your lives are.” It sounded like he was quoting my favourite Beatles song: "There are places I remember all my life. I know I'll often stop and think about them." My Liverpool teammates from 2005 came to understand ‘the look’ as McGeechan described it. We understand the uniqueness of the experience that ties us. Those Liverpool players walking out in Kiev are not just on the threshold of legendary status – which is so valuable to the club and their careers - but forming that same connection which they will cherish beyond their playing days. Win, and they will have books written, documentaries produced and museum exhibitions curated. They will enjoy reunions celebrating their triumph, and the performances against Porto, Manchester City and Roma that took them there. It may sound a cliché, but it is true. Lives will change. The current Liverpool team is on the cusp of greatness Credit: Getty Images Lose, and the memories fade, as they did after I lost the final in Athens in 2007. We beat Barcelona and Chelsea that year. No-one ever mentions it. Athens is just a place to go and visit the Parthenon. Whatever the result in Kiev, I can recall from my own experience what will be said on Sunday morning. “This is just the start. We must build on this,” is the message of the winners. “We can’t forget what we achieved to get here. We will recover and try again,” is the consoling wisdom for those defeated. These will be words devoid of meaning. Forget the past. Ignore the consequences for the future. This is it. Here and now. It is not about starting a new era for those players, or continuing a ‘five-year plan’. Win the European Cup and the world holds you in a higher regard. It cannot and will not get any better than the feeling of holding that beautiful trophy for the first time. You are elevated to global status. My life, perceptions of my playing career and self-perception of my ability changed after Istanbul. Before 2005 I considered myself a good Premier League footballer, but my Champions League experience took it to another level. Everything changed for Liverpool's players after the 'Miracle of Istanbul' Credit: Getty Images I recall the build-up to final, reading an interview with Paolo Maldini – already an AC Milan legend at that point of his career - where he praised my defending, discussing my performances against Chelsea in the semi-final. I was taken aback. Until then, Maldini was a player I admired from afar as one of the greatest of our generation. It may sound strange, but I was shocked he even knew who I was, let alone recognised me enough to compliment me. Psychologically, it had a profound impact. When I walked side by side with the AC Milan players, I was not sure I belonged on that stage. Once we won it, I was sure I did. The nature of our victory led many to say it was a fluke, but in subsequent years key members of that side – Steven Gerrard, Xabi Alonso, Sami Hyypia, John Arne Riise and myself – played in another final, semi-final and quarter-final. The game itself was freakish, but the standard of our performance to win was not. We became better players, and a much-improved team after 2005. The Liverpool side that lost to AC Milan in 2007 was superior to that which won the competition, but we never experienced the emotion of Istanbul again. The four years between 2005 and 2009 were my most consistent as a footballer, in part because of the belief I took from winning the Champions League, but also because having seen my reputation soar in Europe I was even more determined not to let it slip. I do not like the word ‘arrogant’ but when you hear managers talk about this in a football sense, this is what they mean – knowing you have played well under the greatest pressure and you will do so again. This is why players will often tell you winning that first trophy breeds more success. European Cup final 2018 | Real Madrid vs Liverpool There will be players in Jurgen Klopp’s dressing room today going through a similar transformation.If you interviewed Andy Robertson, Jordan Henderson, Trent Alexander-Arnold or Dejan Lovren a year ago, and asked if they regarded themselves as peers of Real Madrid, what would the reaction be? A humble response, I would bet. Yes, they would have spoken of their ambitions and belief in their ability, but getting to the level of the two-time Champions League winners at the end of this season? They would have cautioned about expecting too much, too soon. Any other response would have been mocked. Look where Liverpool have recruited some of their players: Hull, Sunderland, Southampton and Mainz. They must have doubted they would ever play in such a fixture. What will those Liverpool players say if they win this game? They will want more of the same and demand more from themselves. My fear is they are facing a side well-established on this pedestal, with the greatest understanding of how to win at all costs. Cristiano Ronaldo and Sergio Ramos are ‘beasts’ of the modern game, in the best sense of the word. I have confidence the Liverpool players will perform because they have already done so under the highest pressure. Player-for-player, this Liverpool team is better than that which won in Istanbul. It has fewer weaknesses. Yet I maintain the true star of this Liverpool team is the manager. Like his players, Klopp will be consumed by getting over the line. He has been there before and suffered. This is his third European final. Liverpool are in their fifth in 17 years. Some clubs and managers never experience one, but winning isn’t everything - it is the only thing. It is not only the reputation of players that is irreversibly enhanced by lifting the Champions League. This is also true of managers. Klopp will join Bob Paisley, Joe Fagan and Rafa Benitez as an Anfield immortal if he succeeds. To join the elite ranks of ‘super-coaches’ he must add the European Cup to his CV. There has been a prolonged build-up this game. The players and manager will be sick of talking about it. If they win, everything changes. They will be talking about it for forever. My hope is those players will need only state a single word to start the conversation.
<p>Inglaterra quiere volver a tener un buen Mundial y para eso necesitará a Harry Kane a pleno. El delantero del Tottenham brilla en la Premier League y confían en que traslade su buen rendimiento a Rusia. Condiciones no le faltan.</p>
Harry Kane (Inglaterra)

Inglaterra quiere volver a tener un buen Mundial y para eso necesitará a Harry Kane a pleno. El delantero del Tottenham brilla en la Premier League y confían en que traslade su buen rendimiento a Rusia. Condiciones no le faltan.

Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Champions League final: Real Madrid rejected two £130m bids for Marco Asensio from Premier League clubs
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Arsenal hold Forsberg talks
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today's match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
IPL 2018 Qualifier 2: Battle between SRH and KKR for the ticket to finale
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today's match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
What is it? The so-called &#39;richest game in football.&#39; Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What&#39;s the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa&#39;s only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa&#39;s semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. &quot;The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He&#39;s trained for the past two days. He could be in contention,&quot; said Bruce. &quot;We&#39;ll make a decision on Friday.&quot; Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I&#39;ve waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We&#39;re the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That&#39;s the expectation of this club. I&#39;m at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It&#39;s a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn&#39;t let me down at all. I&#39;ve enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. &quot;My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let&#39;s get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let&#39;s hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents&#39; nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
Championship play-off final 2018, Aston Villa vs Fulham: What time is kick off and what TV channel is it on?
What is it? The so-called 'richest game in football.' Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What's the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa's only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa's semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. "The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He's trained for the past two days. He could be in contention," said Bruce. "We'll make a decision on Friday." Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I've waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We're the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That's the expectation of this club. I'm at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It's a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn't let me down at all. I've enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. "My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let's get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let's hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents' nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
What is it? The so-called &#39;richest game in football.&#39; Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What&#39;s the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa&#39;s only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa&#39;s semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. &quot;The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He&#39;s trained for the past two days. He could be in contention,&quot; said Bruce. &quot;We&#39;ll make a decision on Friday.&quot; Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I&#39;ve waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We&#39;re the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That&#39;s the expectation of this club. I&#39;m at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It&#39;s a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn&#39;t let me down at all. I&#39;ve enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. &quot;My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let&#39;s get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let&#39;s hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents&#39; nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
Championship play-off final 2018, Aston Villa vs Fulham: What time is kick off and what TV channel is it on?
What is it? The so-called 'richest game in football.' Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What's the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa's only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa's semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. "The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He's trained for the past two days. He could be in contention," said Bruce. "We'll make a decision on Friday." Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I've waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We're the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That's the expectation of this club. I'm at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It's a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn't let me down at all. I've enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. "My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let's get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let's hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents' nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
What is it? The so-called &#39;richest game in football.&#39; Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What&#39;s the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa&#39;s only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa&#39;s semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. &quot;The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He&#39;s trained for the past two days. He could be in contention,&quot; said Bruce. &quot;We&#39;ll make a decision on Friday.&quot; Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I&#39;ve waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We&#39;re the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That&#39;s the expectation of this club. I&#39;m at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It&#39;s a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn&#39;t let me down at all. I&#39;ve enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. &quot;My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let&#39;s get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let&#39;s hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents&#39; nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
Championship play-off final 2018, Aston Villa vs Fulham: What time is kick off and what TV channel is it on?
What is it? The so-called 'richest game in football.' Aston Villa and Fulham meet at Wembley to decide who will become the third and final Championship team to be promoted to the Premier League. When is it? Saturday May 26: a tasty appetiser before the main course of the Champions League final later that evening. What time is kick off? 5pm. What TV channel is it on? You can watch the game live on Sky Sport Football or Sky Sports Main Event. What's the team news? Ahmed Elmohamady is Aston Villa's only injury doubt going into the final. The full-back injured his hamstring during Aston Villa's semi-final first leg against Middlesbrough and manager Steve Bruce admits he faces a race against time to be fit for Wembley on Saturday. "The next 24-48 hours are crucial. He's trained for the past two days. He could be in contention," said Bruce. "We'll make a decision on Friday." Fulham also have no new injury concerns after their semi-final triumph over Derby County. Ryan Sessegnon boy wonder What are they saying? Steve Bruce on taking Villa back to the top flight Steve Bruce knows Aston Villa fans expect their club to be playing top-flight football next season Credit: Getty Images I've waited 20 years to work at a club like this. We're the fifth most successful club in England. On 26th May 1982 we won the European Cup. That's the expectation of this club. I'm at a great club, a big club that needs to be in the Premier League. To manage here has been an absolute pleasure. It's a great place with a lot of good people working at it. It hasn't let me down at all. I've enjoyed being associated with Aston Villa ever since I arrived. "My hope now is that I can get it moving even more in the right direction and make it even bigger. Let's get it up, build again for next season and take it to where it needs to be. Let's hope this is the start of a new beginning for us – in the Premier League. Slavisa Jokanovic on targeting John Terry Slavisa Jokanovic has admitted Fulham will look to target John Terry Credit: Reuters We are going to try to put against him some fast and some stronger players. I hope he will make some mistakes. This is the kind of impact I expect from his side. All of us can make mistakes. I expect some mistakes from his side and that’s it. When you talk about experience, you are talking about the past Terry is a fantastic player, Chester is a fantastic player. They have experience playing in this stadium. But probably they cannot be in their best level right now. We are the youngest team, the team with more energy. We believe in our style. We believe we can dominate the situation. Experience in life is important but it is not everything. What are the betting odds? Aston Villa 5/4 Fulham 8/11 Prediction The pressure will be firmly on Aston Villa as they bid to justify the huge outlay they have made on transfers in recent seasons. Expect a youthful Fulham side to capitalise on their opponents' nervousness. Score: Fulham 3-1 Aston Villa
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
How Fulham can beat Aston Villa and seal return to the Premier League
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today&#39;s match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
IPL 2018 Qualifier 2: Battle between SRH and KKR for the ticket to finale
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today's match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today&#39;s match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
IPL 2018 Qualifier 2: Battle between SRH and KKR for the ticket to finale
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today's match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today&#39;s match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
IPL 2018 Qualifier 2: Battle between SRH and KKR for the ticket to finale
The Sunrisers Hyderabad (SRH) and Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR) will lock horn in the second qualifier of the Indian Premier League (IPL) 2018 today at Eden Gardens in Kolkata. The two-time champions KKR will cash on their current form which led them to this stage. On the other hand, SRH need to come out with a strong plan to curb their poor performance they exhibited lately. While KKR will look forward to maintain their momentum, SRH would count on their bowling attack which is capable of creating big differences during the game. The winner of today's match will play the finals against the Chennai Super Kings (CSK) on May 27 at the Wankhede Stadium in Mumbai.
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Slavisa Jokanovic wanted by bigger teams so Fulham must reach Premier League now, says Denis Odoi
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the &#39;next cab off the rank&#39; of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next &#39;Big Six&#39; job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco&#39;s parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy&#39;s most productive academies, Giasperini&#39;s Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery&#39;s appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig&#39;s hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe&#39;s name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs&#39; lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal&#39;s hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth&#39;s last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil&#39;s Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves&#39; injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the &#39;siege mentality&#39; that is part of Millwall&#39;s essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison&#39;s strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina&#39;s first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players&#39; mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid&#39;s shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea&#39;s interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho&#39;s former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
The 10 managers nobody is linking with vacant jobs...but should be
Frustration with the same old names and faces occupying Premier League jobs was a feature of last season, and could even prove a watershed moment in how fans think about their manager. Sam Allardyce, Mark Hughes and Alan Pardew are just three beneficiaries of the managerial merry-go-round, but a culture of safe appointments is just as true in the upper echelons of the Premier League. Arsenal appointed Unai Emery as their new head coach on Wednesday while Chelsea have a strong interest Maurizio Sarri and both feel like the 'next cab off the rank' of European coaches. The omnipotent gaffer is being phased out of the game, in favour of more democratic and collegiate structures with power shared between a technical director, recruitment guru and head coach. Here are 10 coaches who might find themselves in contention for jobs when the sacking seasons begins in autumn. Domenico Tedesco (Schalke) Dominic Tedesco led Schalke to a second place finish in the Bundesliga Credit: AFP The head coach of the team who finished second in the Bundesliga is hardly an obscure selection, but 32-year-old Domenico Tedesco looks a cast-iron certainty to be considered for the next 'Big Six' job available. Born in Italy, Tedesco's parents emigrated to Germany when he was two years old. He never played football professionally but like Hoffenheim coach Julian Nagelsmann found a break in coaching at a young age. Appointed by second-tier Erzgebirge Aue in March 2017, Tedesco won 13 points from five games to guide them to safety. Schalke took a chance on him last summer and under his guidance the Gelsenkirchen club have qualified for the Champions League after a three-year absence. Regarded as a tactically flexible coach, one highlight of a superb debut season was a comeback from 4-0 down to 4-4 in the derby against Borussia Dortmund. Gian Piero Gasperini (Atalanta) Gasperini lasted only five games as Inter Milan manager in 2011, but has bounced back since then Credit: Getty Images Lasted only five games at Inter in 2011, but Gian Piero Gasperini has a warranted reputation for getting a lot from a little. He guided Genoa to Europe in 2009 but it is his work at Atalanta over the past few seasons that has really caught the eye. Benefiting from one of Italy's most productive academies, Giasperini's Atlanta recovered from losing four of their first five league games to finish fourth in 2016-17, achieving European qualification for the first time in 26-years. The 58-year-old coach ripped up the tactical rule-book, using a Dutch-style 3-4-3 that left opponents dumbfounded. Despite losing Franck Kessie to Milan last summer and other key players, Atalanta continued to punch above their weight with a seventh-placed finish. Giasperini is not the youthful up-and-comer some clubs crave, but any club looking to maximise meagre resources could do far worse. Giovanni van Bronckhorst (Feyenoord) Giovanni van Bronckhorst was loosely linked with Arsenal before Unai Emery's appointment Credit: Getty Images The former Arsenal player received a ringing endorsement from Arsene Wenger last year and a glance at his record makes it easy to see why. Guided Feyenoord to the Dutch Cup in his first season before winning the Eredivisie in his second, coaxing the best out of a squad with a mix of talented youngsters and wise old heads such as Dirk Kuyt. Last season proved more challenging, but Feyenoord did rally late, winning their last eight league matches to finish fourth and claimed another cup. Ralph Hasenhüttl (free agent) Hasenhüttl stepped down as RB Leipzig head coach at the end of last season after two seasons in charge. Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund have made both made new appointments this summer, so Hasenhüttl must consider his next move. The Austrian guided the controversial Bundesliga newcomers to second-place and Champions League qualification with a brand of high-octane, progressive football. He may have fallen out with RB Leipzig's hierarchy over a new contract, but Hasenhüttl looks ideally suited to any club with a technical director-head coach set-up. Whether he can find a club that can unearth talent like Naby Keita or Emil Forsberg is another matter. Eddie Howe (Bournemouth) Eddie Howe's name has not been mentioned for recent managerial vacancies Credit: Reuters Not an unfamiliar name, but one who seems to be drifting down clubs' lists. In the summer of 2016 there were reports that he was well thought of by Arsenal's hierarchy, and he was also linked with Everton - the club he supported as a boy. He was frequently spoken of as a potential England manager too. Several managerial vacancies have opened up in the last few months, and Howe does not seem to have been considered for any of them. He has done nothing to diminish his reputation in the intervening period, quite the opposite in fact, so his diminished status is curious. Bournemouth's last two league finishes are ninth and 12th - a commendable achievement. His record in the transfer market is patchy however, and there is also a risk that becomes institutionalised at Bournemouth. Familiarity breeds contempt. Tite (Brazil) Tite has been praised for his man-management of Neymar Credit: Reuters The quality of manager in international football is desperately low, but Brazil's Tite is one who looks capable of stepping into a top club job. Has galvanised a group of players rocked by a 7-1 World Cup semi-final humiliation on home soil at the hands of Germany. Following the oppressive Dunga, Tite has put an arm round a few of his charges and the result is possibly the best Brazil team since 2002. Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Philippe Coutinho will lead the charge in Russia, with Roberto Firmino and Willian in reserve, supported by a likely midfield three of Casemiro, Paulinho and Rene Augusto. Dani Alves' injury is a blow, leaving the right-back berth free in a back four otherwise compromised of Thiago Silva, Marquinhos and Marcelo. In goal, they can choose between Alisson and Ederson. Not bad. Neil Harris (Millwall) Lee Johnson, Dean Smith and Paul Cook are all promising Championship managers, but Neil Harris has done a remarkable job at the Den against all the odds. Building upon the 'siege mentality' that is part of Millwall's essential character, and thanks in no small part to Lee Gregory and Steve Morison's strike partnership, Harris has taken the London club from League One to the brink of the play-offs. It would take a hell of an offer to tempt Harris away from Millwall however, where he enjoys legendary status. Marcelo Gallardo (River Plate) Another disciple of Marcelo Bielsa, Gallardo could be the next successful Argentinian coaching export. Appointed River Plate manager in 2014, he has tucked away the Copa Sudamericana, Copa Libertadores and the Recopa already. Gallardo has a reputation as an innovator too, becoming the first coach in Argentina's first division to appoint a female assistant as well as working with a neuroscientist to hone players' mental approach. Could be on Atletico Madrid's shortlist should Diego Simeone ever depart. Slavisa Jokanovic (Fulham) There have been some recent whispers that Chelsea are interested in Slavisa Jokanovic Credit: PA There have already been whispers of Chelsea's interest, but if Fulham win their play-off final against Aston Villa and thrive in the Premier League then Jokanovic will be a wanted man. Fulham were without a doubt the best footballing side in the Championship last season, but Jokanovic also possesses an inner-steel that ensures discipline is not lost in all the pretty passing patterns. For clubs lost in the Premier League mid-table morass, Jokanovic would instill a style of play and an identity for fans to believe in. Rui Vitoria (Benfica) Has lifted two Portuguese championships and two cups in three seasons at Benfica, and at 48 Vitoria must surely be considering a fresh challenge. Losing out on the championship to Porto this season also has Vitoria under pressure Benfica are a dominant force, but a win percentage of 70% after 152 matches in charge remains impressive. Jose Mourinho's former assistant Rui Faria has been linked to the job, so that could free Vitoria to seek pastures new.
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