Futbol inglés

Las mejores imágenes de la Premier League

Liverpool bermain imbang dengan skor 2-2 lawan West Bromwich Albion pada lanjutan Premier League, Sabtu (21/4/2018).
Striker Liverpool Kecewa Setelah Cetak Gol ke Gawang West Bromwich Albion
Liverpool bermain imbang dengan skor 2-2 lawan West Bromwich Albion pada lanjutan Premier League, Sabtu (21/4/2018).
Could Julian Nagelsmann be on the move to the Premier League? The 30-year-old Hoffenheim head coach says no.
Hoffenheim boss Nagelsmann dismisses Arsenal and Chelsea links
Could Julian Nagelsmann be on the move to the Premier League? The 30-year-old Hoffenheim head coach says no.
Berikut ini adalah jadwal pertandingan Premier League malam ini, 22 April 2018.
Jadwal Pertandingan Premier League Malam Ini
Berikut ini adalah jadwal pertandingan Premier League malam ini, 22 April 2018.
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Real Madrid lower Bale asking price
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
<p>Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours</p>
Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours

Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours

<p>Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours</p>
Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours

Hoffenheim manager Nagelsmann downplays Premier League rumours

Liverpool&#39;s Mohamed Salah celebrates scoring his side&#39;s second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Liverpool's Mohamed Salah celebrates scoring his side's second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Liverpool's Mohamed Salah celebrates scoring his side's second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Liverpool&#39;s Mohamed Salah scores his side&#39;s second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Liverpool's Mohamed Salah scores his side's second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Liverpool's Mohamed Salah scores his side's second goal of the game, during the English Premier League soccer match between West Bromwich Albion and Liverpool, at The Hawthorns, West Bromwich, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Nigel French/PA via AP)
Watford&#39;s Christian Kabasele, left, and Crystal Palace&#39;s Wilfried Zaha battle for the ball during the English Premier League soccer match at Vicarage Road, Watford, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)
Watford's Christian Kabasele, left, and Crystal Palace's Wilfried Zaha battle for the ball during the English Premier League soccer match at Vicarage Road, Watford, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)
Watford's Christian Kabasele, left, and Crystal Palace's Wilfried Zaha battle for the ball during the English Premier League soccer match at Vicarage Road, Watford, England, Saturday April 21, 2018. (Jonathan Brady/PA via AP)
Sean Morrison and Aron Gunnarsson were on target as Cardiff City banked three precious points in their bid to reach the Premier League.
Cardiff edge Forest to boost promotion push
Sean Morrison and Aron Gunnarsson were on target as Cardiff City banked three precious points in their bid to reach the Premier League.
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United&#39;s priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United&#39;s priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United&#39;s priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Jose Mourinho says Premier League remains Manchester United's priority as Mauricio Pochettino questions mentality
Pep Guardiola can finally celebrate Manchester City’s title victory today, one week after it was confirmed, although he believes it will take more such successes before the club can challenge for Europe’s biggest prize. City were knocked out of the Champions League 5-1 by Liverpool in the quarter-finals and Guardiola insists that Europe’s ultimate club honour is not their priority. Instead, he says he would settle for “only” the Premier League again next season as he believes City lack the “respect” and status to win in Europe. “I realise this season how difficult it will be to win the Champions League,” said Guardiola ahead of today’s meeting with Swansea. “Maybe I am wrong but before you win the Champions League you have to win more Premier Leagues in a row, to get respect in Europe that you are a top club. Guardiola has warned his squad against complacency despite their emphatic title win Credit: AP “Of course we are going to try but I don’t know if we are like a club to have the power on and off the pitch to achieve and to get there. So I would prefer, like this season, to be solid in the Premier League. “The Premier League is the priority next season, absolutely. The Premier League is the most important title.” Guardiola declined to expand upon precisely how a lack of respect cost his club in Europe although the City manager was vocal about what he believed were poor refereeing decisions in the defeats against Liverpool. However, the Catalan insisted he was under no pressure from City’s owners to deliver on the European stage. “When I came here, the chairman never said ‘you have to win the Champions League’ or ‘you have to win the Premier League’,” said Guardiola. Manchester City player ratings for Premier League title winning season “They said to do what you believe to do and try to be constant for as long as possible. We did it for one season but I think to be a solid team, and Europe can start watching what we have done, it is not just one season. “But what I have experienced for two seasons with this club in Europe, it is better to be focused on the Premier League, FA Cup, Carabao Cup and then the Champions League.” Despite Sunday&#39;s party atmosphere, Guardiola wants a positive response from his players. “They think that because they’ve done it once they will do it again and that makes them lose energy,” he said. “When they used to run five metres now they run three metres. And that two metres makes the difference. “That’s why next season will be much harder. It happened in Barcelona and Munich. I made the players press more and work more. Our relationship next season will not be this friendly.”
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola can finally celebrate Manchester City’s title victory today, one week after it was confirmed, although he believes it will take more such successes before the club can challenge for Europe’s biggest prize. City were knocked out of the Champions League 5-1 by Liverpool in the quarter-finals and Guardiola insists that Europe’s ultimate club honour is not their priority. Instead, he says he would settle for “only” the Premier League again next season as he believes City lack the “respect” and status to win in Europe. “I realise this season how difficult it will be to win the Champions League,” said Guardiola ahead of today’s meeting with Swansea. “Maybe I am wrong but before you win the Champions League you have to win more Premier Leagues in a row, to get respect in Europe that you are a top club. Guardiola has warned his squad against complacency despite their emphatic title win Credit: AP “Of course we are going to try but I don’t know if we are like a club to have the power on and off the pitch to achieve and to get there. So I would prefer, like this season, to be solid in the Premier League. “The Premier League is the priority next season, absolutely. The Premier League is the most important title.” Guardiola declined to expand upon precisely how a lack of respect cost his club in Europe although the City manager was vocal about what he believed were poor refereeing decisions in the defeats against Liverpool. However, the Catalan insisted he was under no pressure from City’s owners to deliver on the European stage. “When I came here, the chairman never said ‘you have to win the Champions League’ or ‘you have to win the Premier League’,” said Guardiola. Manchester City player ratings for Premier League title winning season “They said to do what you believe to do and try to be constant for as long as possible. We did it for one season but I think to be a solid team, and Europe can start watching what we have done, it is not just one season. “But what I have experienced for two seasons with this club in Europe, it is better to be focused on the Premier League, FA Cup, Carabao Cup and then the Champions League.” Despite Sunday's party atmosphere, Guardiola wants a positive response from his players. “They think that because they’ve done it once they will do it again and that makes them lose energy,” he said. “When they used to run five metres now they run three metres. And that two metres makes the difference. “That’s why next season will be much harder. It happened in Barcelona and Munich. I made the players press more and work more. Our relationship next season will not be this friendly.”
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City &#39;respect in Europe&#39;
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola can finally celebrate Manchester City’s title victory today, one week after it was confirmed, although he believes it will take more such successes before the club can challenge for Europe’s biggest prize. City were knocked out of the Champions League 5-1 by Liverpool in the quarter-finals and Guardiola insists that Europe’s ultimate club honour is not their priority. Instead, he says he would settle for “only” the Premier League again next season as he believes City lack the “respect” and status to win in Europe. “I realise this season how difficult it will be to win the Champions League,” said Guardiola ahead of today’s meeting with Swansea. “Maybe I am wrong but before you win the Champions League you have to win more Premier Leagues in a row, to get respect in Europe that you are a top club. Guardiola has warned his squad against complacency despite their emphatic title win Credit: AP “Of course we are going to try but I don’t know if we are like a club to have the power on and off the pitch to achieve and to get there. So I would prefer, like this season, to be solid in the Premier League. “The Premier League is the priority next season, absolutely. The Premier League is the most important title.” Guardiola declined to expand upon precisely how a lack of respect cost his club in Europe although the City manager was vocal about what he believed were poor refereeing decisions in the defeats against Liverpool. However, the Catalan insisted he was under no pressure from City’s owners to deliver on the European stage. “When I came here, the chairman never said ‘you have to win the Champions League’ or ‘you have to win the Premier League’,” said Guardiola. Manchester City player ratings for Premier League title winning season “They said to do what you believe to do and try to be constant for as long as possible. We did it for one season but I think to be a solid team, and Europe can start watching what we have done, it is not just one season. “But what I have experienced for two seasons with this club in Europe, it is better to be focused on the Premier League, FA Cup, Carabao Cup and then the Champions League.” Despite Sunday&#39;s party atmosphere, Guardiola wants a positive response from his players. “They think that because they’ve done it once they will do it again and that makes them lose energy,” he said. “When they used to run five metres now they run three metres. And that two metres makes the difference. “That’s why next season will be much harder. It happened in Barcelona and Munich. I made the players press more and work more. Our relationship next season will not be this friendly.”
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola can finally celebrate Manchester City’s title victory today, one week after it was confirmed, although he believes it will take more such successes before the club can challenge for Europe’s biggest prize. City were knocked out of the Champions League 5-1 by Liverpool in the quarter-finals and Guardiola insists that Europe’s ultimate club honour is not their priority. Instead, he says he would settle for “only” the Premier League again next season as he believes City lack the “respect” and status to win in Europe. “I realise this season how difficult it will be to win the Champions League,” said Guardiola ahead of today’s meeting with Swansea. “Maybe I am wrong but before you win the Champions League you have to win more Premier Leagues in a row, to get respect in Europe that you are a top club. Guardiola has warned his squad against complacency despite their emphatic title win Credit: AP “Of course we are going to try but I don’t know if we are like a club to have the power on and off the pitch to achieve and to get there. So I would prefer, like this season, to be solid in the Premier League. “The Premier League is the priority next season, absolutely. The Premier League is the most important title.” Guardiola declined to expand upon precisely how a lack of respect cost his club in Europe although the City manager was vocal about what he believed were poor refereeing decisions in the defeats against Liverpool. However, the Catalan insisted he was under no pressure from City’s owners to deliver on the European stage. “When I came here, the chairman never said ‘you have to win the Champions League’ or ‘you have to win the Premier League’,” said Guardiola. Manchester City player ratings for Premier League title winning season “They said to do what you believe to do and try to be constant for as long as possible. We did it for one season but I think to be a solid team, and Europe can start watching what we have done, it is not just one season. “But what I have experienced for two seasons with this club in Europe, it is better to be focused on the Premier League, FA Cup, Carabao Cup and then the Champions League.” Despite Sunday's party atmosphere, Guardiola wants a positive response from his players. “They think that because they’ve done it once they will do it again and that makes them lose energy,” he said. “When they used to run five metres now they run three metres. And that two metres makes the difference. “That’s why next season will be much harder. It happened in Barcelona and Munich. I made the players press more and work more. Our relationship next season will not be this friendly.”
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City &#39;respect in Europe&#39;
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City &#39;respect in Europe&#39;
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
Pep Guardiola insists multiple Premier League titles are needed to earn Manchester City 'respect in Europe'
<p>Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine</p>
Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine

Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine

Manchester City stand a better chance of Champions League success if they keep picking up Premier League titles, says Pep Guardiola.
Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine
Manchester City stand a better chance of Champions League success if they keep picking up Premier League titles, says Pep Guardiola.
<p>Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine</p>
Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine

Guardiola: I want Manchester City to be a Premier League machine

Stoke are ready to cancel Jese Rodriguez’s loan deal from Paris Saint-Germain, as the strugglers prepare for one of the most crucial games in their Premier League history. Jese’s troubled spell at the bet365 Stadium is finally over after angering Stoke officials with his failure to attend training for the last two weeks. The former Real Madrid attacker was expected to report back a week last Wednesday, after being granted compassionate leave, but he is yet to show up and Stoke’s patience has finally snapped. Stoke are now scrapping Jese’s season-long loan early, as they prepare for the final four games of their relegation battle. It is expected that an agreement will be reached to end the deal in the next few days. Paul Lambert, the manager, and Stoke’s board are determined to ensure full focus is on their safety mission and Jese’s conduct has infuriated the club at a time when they are in deep trouble. Jese (right) is being sent back to Paris Saint-Germain Credit: AFP His self-imposed strike has come under sharper scrutiny this week by the dedication of captain Ryan Shawcross, who played against West Ham on Monday just days after the death of his father. Stoke face Burnley at home on Sunday with chairman Peter Coates making no attempt to downplay the significance of the game. Coates told Telegraph Sport: “It’s a massive game and undoubtedly one of the most important in the 10 years Stoke have been in the Premier League. “We’ve never fought relegation before at this stage of the season so we all realise how hugely important it is. We’ve clearly had some great times in the Premier League and we desperately want to keep them going. “If we can win against Burnley it keeps us right in the mix. We’re all up for the fight.” Jese, a Champions League winner with Real Madrid, will now play no further part in Stoke’s relegation battle after a difficult spell in the Potteries. Signed by former Stoke manager Mark Hughes in August, his arrival was initially seen as a huge coup for the club. He scored on his debut in the 1-0 win over Arsenal but has struggled since – he was fined in December for storming down the tunnel before the final whistle when he was an unused substitute. Jese has frequently been granted time to fly back to Spain to care for his ill baby boy, and while the club have been careful to give him time off during a challenging period, his decision to go awol has proven the final straw. Ahead of the clash with Burnley, Lambert said: “I need people that are going to play my way. This is what I do. If you don’t want to do it there is no point coming because I don’t want anything else other than people that are going to put the effort in. “You look at Burnley, they have got some backbone. I saw them against Chelsea, they were never out of the game and Sean [Dyche] has lads that know what it&#39;s about. “It’s a predominantly British team and he’s had it for a few years now. That gives them a good grounding and a good structure. It&#39;s, &#39;this is the way we play and if you don’t abide by that there’s no point in playing&#39;. It’s the same as myself.”
Stoke City in talks to rip up Jese Rodriguez loan deal from PSG
Stoke are ready to cancel Jese Rodriguez’s loan deal from Paris Saint-Germain, as the strugglers prepare for one of the most crucial games in their Premier League history. Jese’s troubled spell at the bet365 Stadium is finally over after angering Stoke officials with his failure to attend training for the last two weeks. The former Real Madrid attacker was expected to report back a week last Wednesday, after being granted compassionate leave, but he is yet to show up and Stoke’s patience has finally snapped. Stoke are now scrapping Jese’s season-long loan early, as they prepare for the final four games of their relegation battle. It is expected that an agreement will be reached to end the deal in the next few days. Paul Lambert, the manager, and Stoke’s board are determined to ensure full focus is on their safety mission and Jese’s conduct has infuriated the club at a time when they are in deep trouble. Jese (right) is being sent back to Paris Saint-Germain Credit: AFP His self-imposed strike has come under sharper scrutiny this week by the dedication of captain Ryan Shawcross, who played against West Ham on Monday just days after the death of his father. Stoke face Burnley at home on Sunday with chairman Peter Coates making no attempt to downplay the significance of the game. Coates told Telegraph Sport: “It’s a massive game and undoubtedly one of the most important in the 10 years Stoke have been in the Premier League. “We’ve never fought relegation before at this stage of the season so we all realise how hugely important it is. We’ve clearly had some great times in the Premier League and we desperately want to keep them going. “If we can win against Burnley it keeps us right in the mix. We’re all up for the fight.” Jese, a Champions League winner with Real Madrid, will now play no further part in Stoke’s relegation battle after a difficult spell in the Potteries. Signed by former Stoke manager Mark Hughes in August, his arrival was initially seen as a huge coup for the club. He scored on his debut in the 1-0 win over Arsenal but has struggled since – he was fined in December for storming down the tunnel before the final whistle when he was an unused substitute. Jese has frequently been granted time to fly back to Spain to care for his ill baby boy, and while the club have been careful to give him time off during a challenging period, his decision to go awol has proven the final straw. Ahead of the clash with Burnley, Lambert said: “I need people that are going to play my way. This is what I do. If you don’t want to do it there is no point coming because I don’t want anything else other than people that are going to put the effort in. “You look at Burnley, they have got some backbone. I saw them against Chelsea, they were never out of the game and Sean [Dyche] has lads that know what it's about. “It’s a predominantly British team and he’s had it for a few years now. That gives them a good grounding and a good structure. It's, 'this is the way we play and if you don’t abide by that there’s no point in playing'. It’s the same as myself.”
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea&#39;s comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year&#39;s FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
Antonio Conte hoping to salvage season and strengthen Chelsea legacy with FA Cup victory over Southampton
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea's comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year's FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea&#39;s comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year&#39;s FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
Antonio Conte hoping to salvage season and strengthen Chelsea legacy with FA Cup victory over Southampton
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea's comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year's FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
Stoke are ready to cancel Jese Rodriguez’s loan deal from Paris Saint-Germain, as the strugglers prepare for one of the most crucial games in their Premier League history. Jese’s troubled spell at the bet365 Stadium is finally over after angering Stoke officials with his failure to attend training for the last two weeks. The former Real Madrid attacker was expected to report back a week last Wednesday, after being granted compassionate leave, but he is yet to show up and Stoke’s patience has finally snapped. Stoke are now scrapping Jese’s season-long loan early, as they prepare for the final four games of their relegation battle. It is expected that an agreement will be reached to end the deal in the next few days. Paul Lambert, the manager, and Stoke’s board are determined to ensure full focus is on their safety mission and Jese’s conduct has infuriated the club at a time when they are in deep trouble. Jese (right) is being sent back to Paris Saint-Germain Credit: AFP His self-imposed strike has come under sharper scrutiny this week by the dedication of captain Ryan Shawcross, who played against West Ham on Monday just days after the death of his father. Stoke face Burnley at home on Sunday with chairman Peter Coates making no attempt to downplay the significance of the game. Coates told Telegraph Sport: “It’s a massive game and undoubtedly one of the most important in the 10 years Stoke have been in the Premier League. “We’ve never fought relegation before at this stage of the season so we all realise how hugely important it is. We’ve clearly had some great times in the Premier League and we desperately want to keep them going. “If we can win against Burnley it keeps us right in the mix. We’re all up for the fight.” Jese, a Champions League winner with Real Madrid, will now play no further part in Stoke’s relegation battle after a difficult spell in the Potteries. Signed by former Stoke manager Mark Hughes in August, his arrival was initially seen as a huge coup for the club. He scored on his debut in the 1-0 win over Arsenal but has struggled since – he was fined in December for storming down the tunnel before the final whistle when he was an unused substitute. Jese has frequently been granted time to fly back to Spain to care for his ill baby boy, and while the club have been careful to give him time off during a challenging period, his decision to go awol has proven the final straw. Ahead of the clash with Burnley, Lambert said: “I need people that are going to play my way. This is what I do. If you don’t want to do it there is no point coming because I don’t want anything else other than people that are going to put the effort in. “You look at Burnley, they have got some backbone. I saw them against Chelsea, they were never out of the game and Sean [Dyche] has lads that know what it&#39;s about. “It’s a predominantly British team and he’s had it for a few years now. That gives them a good grounding and a good structure. It&#39;s, &#39;this is the way we play and if you don’t abide by that there’s no point in playing&#39;. It’s the same as myself.”
Stoke City in talks to rip up Jese Rodriguez loan deal from PSG
Stoke are ready to cancel Jese Rodriguez’s loan deal from Paris Saint-Germain, as the strugglers prepare for one of the most crucial games in their Premier League history. Jese’s troubled spell at the bet365 Stadium is finally over after angering Stoke officials with his failure to attend training for the last two weeks. The former Real Madrid attacker was expected to report back a week last Wednesday, after being granted compassionate leave, but he is yet to show up and Stoke’s patience has finally snapped. Stoke are now scrapping Jese’s season-long loan early, as they prepare for the final four games of their relegation battle. It is expected that an agreement will be reached to end the deal in the next few days. Paul Lambert, the manager, and Stoke’s board are determined to ensure full focus is on their safety mission and Jese’s conduct has infuriated the club at a time when they are in deep trouble. Jese (right) is being sent back to Paris Saint-Germain Credit: AFP His self-imposed strike has come under sharper scrutiny this week by the dedication of captain Ryan Shawcross, who played against West Ham on Monday just days after the death of his father. Stoke face Burnley at home on Sunday with chairman Peter Coates making no attempt to downplay the significance of the game. Coates told Telegraph Sport: “It’s a massive game and undoubtedly one of the most important in the 10 years Stoke have been in the Premier League. “We’ve never fought relegation before at this stage of the season so we all realise how hugely important it is. We’ve clearly had some great times in the Premier League and we desperately want to keep them going. “If we can win against Burnley it keeps us right in the mix. We’re all up for the fight.” Jese, a Champions League winner with Real Madrid, will now play no further part in Stoke’s relegation battle after a difficult spell in the Potteries. Signed by former Stoke manager Mark Hughes in August, his arrival was initially seen as a huge coup for the club. He scored on his debut in the 1-0 win over Arsenal but has struggled since – he was fined in December for storming down the tunnel before the final whistle when he was an unused substitute. Jese has frequently been granted time to fly back to Spain to care for his ill baby boy, and while the club have been careful to give him time off during a challenging period, his decision to go awol has proven the final straw. Ahead of the clash with Burnley, Lambert said: “I need people that are going to play my way. This is what I do. If you don’t want to do it there is no point coming because I don’t want anything else other than people that are going to put the effort in. “You look at Burnley, they have got some backbone. I saw them against Chelsea, they were never out of the game and Sean [Dyche] has lads that know what it's about. “It’s a predominantly British team and he’s had it for a few years now. That gives them a good grounding and a good structure. It's, 'this is the way we play and if you don’t abide by that there’s no point in playing'. It’s the same as myself.”
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea&#39;s comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year&#39;s FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
Antonio Conte hoping to salvage season and strengthen Chelsea legacy with FA Cup victory over Southampton
In the tumultuous history of the modern Chelsea, where impending disaster stalks every title and each boom is followed by bust, it has become increasingly difficult to quantify the meaning of success. Would victory in the FA Cup be enough to assuage the damage of failing to qualify for next season’s Champions League? Would a triumphant day at a Wembley final wash away the various tensions that have pockmarked an awkward season? And would a domestic trophy restore to its gleaming best the reputation of Antonio Conte, a manager who has veered from brilliant to belligerent but still lays claim to being one of Europe’s finest? These are the questions that will hover over Chelsea’s players as they trot out to face Southampton in an FA Cup semi-final that provides them with a chance to salvage a campaign defined by bickering and underperformance. But for Conte, it perhaps goes further than that. For him, the FA Cup represents an opportunity to strengthen his legacy, enhance his standing and add a touch more glamour to the CV before his inevitable departure this summer. The Italian enjoys reminding people that he is a winner - “I don’t play to enjoy,” he said, on the eve of this trip to Wembley - yet his second season is dangerously close to being classified as a failure. It is arguably Conte who has the most to gain from lifting the FA Cup trophy next month, and the most to lose from allowing this season to fade into insignificance. “Every season I start with only one idea in my mind,” he said. “In my mind, in my heart, in my soul must be this winning mentality. If I win something, I did my job, not something special. If we don’t win, I am very angry, above all with myself. But at the same time I am ready to work harder to try and win something the next chance I have.” It is, one suspects, this dynamic that has made Conte so preoccupied with the mental state of his squad. As he has struggled to maintain his hold over players that have become gradually less responsive to his high-maintenance approach, Conte has become increasingly concerned with their “spirit”. He spoke after last week’s league victory over Southampton about the importance of having the right “fire in the eyes”, and said he failed to transfer the “right passion” to his players in the first half. Again, ahead of this second meeting with Mark Hughes’s side in eight days, he reiterated the importance of enthusing his players with his “winning mentality”. The message is clear: you must be as hungry as I am. If not, trouble awaits. Conte learned as much in the first hour of their visit to Southampton last week, when they trailed 2-0 before substitute Olivier Giroud inspired a late comeback. Olivier Giroud inspired Chelsea's comeback against Southampton Credit: AFP “If we are the team that played the first half and a part of the second half [at St Mary’s], we must be concerned,” Conte said. “Really concerned. If we go to play with the right team spirit, like against Burnley [on Thursday] or in the last minutes of the Southampton game, we have a possibility of reaching the final. But my players have to know this.” Conte has been here before, overseeing the defeat of Tottenham Hotspur in a thrilling semi-final last season before they went on to be beaten by an under-strength Arsenal in the final, which clearly still grates. “I must be honest,” he said. “Last season we missed a great chance to win the FA Cup. We were in the best condition to try and go and win the FA Cup, and we missed that chance. It was our fault. We could do better. In that moment, we were stronger than them.” Antonio Conte is rueful about losing last year's FA Cup final Credit: ACTION IMAGES Conte believes that this year’s final would be more challenging, given the calibre of the opposition. They must overcome Southampton first, though, and Conte has a decision to make over which attacking players he selects. He paired Giroud with Alvaro Morata in the victory over Burnley, and could do the same again at Wembley despite Morata’s disappointing return of two goals in 18 games since Boxing Day. Conte will be without the suspended Marcos Alonso again, while midfielder Danny Drinkwater is a doubt. The Italian should still have more than enough firepower, though, to see off the challenge of a Southampton side that remains four points away from Premier League safety with four games remaining. “I am very surprised to see them in this position in the table,” Conte said. “They have talented players. Don’t forget, only one week ago we were losing 2-0 after 60 minutes. The last game, it will be very important for our approach, for our future in this competition.” And, perhaps, for his future beyond this club.
Mauricio Pochettino has hinted that he may not stay around to deliver Tottenham Hotspur their first trophy in a decade after losing to Manchester United at Wembley, the second consecutive FA Cup semi-final defeat from a winning position in two years. Dele Alli gave Spurs the lead within ten minutes but they were beaten by goals in either half from Alexis Sanchez and Ander Herrera, prompting Pochettino to hint at his own future saying that “to create that [success] doesn’t take a few years, Tottenham needs more time - with me or another [manager].” Pochettino, contracted until 2021, had earlier made the same point to broadcaster beIN Sports saying: “To compete in this type of game, I think we are ready to compete - but win is different. The most important [thing] is that we are in this process, that after four years we can compete and that is fantastic. “But the disappointment and frustration is that we are close but we cannot reach. I told your colleague before that with me or another coaching staff the club needs to push on, working in this direction and will be fantastic one day for Tottenham to reach the same level as the clubs like Manchester United and Manchester City. But a long way to work to arrive at this next level.” Heartache | Spurs’ eight successive Cup semi-final defeats Alli said that Tottenham Hotspur had let themselves down with and that the club could not keep “throwing away” the chance to win the first trophy of the Pochettino era. Alli told the BBC: &quot;We let ourselves down, it&#39;s very disappointing. We have to try and pick ourselves up and finish the season strongly. You can&#39;t go 1-0 up and then 2-1 down against a team like Manchester United. We can&#39;t put ourselves in that situation. &quot;We were dominant from the first minute and it only looked to be going one way. Everyone talks. We want to win trophies, we have the staff that want to win. We can&#39;t keep doing this. We can&#39;t throw it away. We have got to improve.” Pochettino was more optimistic saying that in certain games Spurs could compete with the much greater wealth of the two Manchester clubs. He said: “The most difficult thing in football is to be realistic because no-one wants to be realistic. But at some point you need to be. If we believe in that process, in that way that we are working it will be so easy to face teams like City and United. We are able to win. Some games you can do it. But most of the game you are going to struggle to compete. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings “But that is the way we have decided to go and Tottenham is a completely different club to the others. And we are in the process in the last four years, there was the challenge to try to be competitive in the top four. We have been there and competitive but to win a trophy is not easy.” Jose Mourinho said he believed his side were always in control, and challenged his players to compete at the same level every game. “We lost against Spurs and we lost against Chelsea and City in the Premier League too but the players need to educate themselves, of course with a little bit of my help,” he said. “They have to educate themselves to face every game with the same mentality. “If in the cups you can say ‘big game, I’m here’ then in the championship every game means three points. We lost some points that we shouldn’t have.”
Mauricio Pochettino raises doubts over Tottenham future after falling short in FA Cup semi-final once again
Mauricio Pochettino has hinted that he may not stay around to deliver Tottenham Hotspur their first trophy in a decade after losing to Manchester United at Wembley, the second consecutive FA Cup semi-final defeat from a winning position in two years. Dele Alli gave Spurs the lead within ten minutes but they were beaten by goals in either half from Alexis Sanchez and Ander Herrera, prompting Pochettino to hint at his own future saying that “to create that [success] doesn’t take a few years, Tottenham needs more time - with me or another [manager].” Pochettino, contracted until 2021, had earlier made the same point to broadcaster beIN Sports saying: “To compete in this type of game, I think we are ready to compete - but win is different. The most important [thing] is that we are in this process, that after four years we can compete and that is fantastic. “But the disappointment and frustration is that we are close but we cannot reach. I told your colleague before that with me or another coaching staff the club needs to push on, working in this direction and will be fantastic one day for Tottenham to reach the same level as the clubs like Manchester United and Manchester City. But a long way to work to arrive at this next level.” Heartache | Spurs’ eight successive Cup semi-final defeats Alli said that Tottenham Hotspur had let themselves down with and that the club could not keep “throwing away” the chance to win the first trophy of the Pochettino era. Alli told the BBC: "We let ourselves down, it's very disappointing. We have to try and pick ourselves up and finish the season strongly. You can't go 1-0 up and then 2-1 down against a team like Manchester United. We can't put ourselves in that situation. "We were dominant from the first minute and it only looked to be going one way. Everyone talks. We want to win trophies, we have the staff that want to win. We can't keep doing this. We can't throw it away. We have got to improve.” Pochettino was more optimistic saying that in certain games Spurs could compete with the much greater wealth of the two Manchester clubs. He said: “The most difficult thing in football is to be realistic because no-one wants to be realistic. But at some point you need to be. If we believe in that process, in that way that we are working it will be so easy to face teams like City and United. We are able to win. Some games you can do it. But most of the game you are going to struggle to compete. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings “But that is the way we have decided to go and Tottenham is a completely different club to the others. And we are in the process in the last four years, there was the challenge to try to be competitive in the top four. We have been there and competitive but to win a trophy is not easy.” Jose Mourinho said he believed his side were always in control, and challenged his players to compete at the same level every game. “We lost against Spurs and we lost against Chelsea and City in the Premier League too but the players need to educate themselves, of course with a little bit of my help,” he said. “They have to educate themselves to face every game with the same mentality. “If in the cups you can say ‘big game, I’m here’ then in the championship every game means three points. We lost some points that we shouldn’t have.”
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Crystal Palace&#39;s Wilfried Zaha reacts after being shown a yellow card for simulation Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Crystal Palace's Wilfried Zaha reacts after being shown a yellow card for simulation Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford&#39;s Roberto Pereyra in action with Crystal Palace&#39;s Joel Ward Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford's Roberto Pereyra in action with Crystal Palace's Joel Ward Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford&#39;s Troy Deeney in action with Crystal Palace&#39;s Joel Ward and James Tomkins Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford's Troy Deeney in action with Crystal Palace's Joel Ward and James Tomkins Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Crystal Palace&#39;s Wayne Hennessey punches clear of Watford&#39;s Troy Deeney Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Crystal Palace's Wayne Hennessey punches clear of Watford's Troy Deeney Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford&#39;s Stefano Okaka in action with Crystal Palace&#39;s James Tomkins REUTERS/Darren Staples EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford's Stefano Okaka in action with Crystal Palace's James Tomkins REUTERS/Darren Staples EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Wilfried Zaha was involved in a fresh diving storm after the Crystal Palace star was booked for simulation in Saturday&#39;s 0-0 draw at Watford.
Premier League: Wilfred Zaha gets involved in diving storm as Crystal Palace, Watford play out goalless draw
Wilfried Zaha was involved in a fresh diving storm after the Crystal Palace star was booked for simulation in Saturday's 0-0 draw at Watford.
Jose Mourinho had been pretty adamant in the wake of Manchester United’s meek surrender at home to West Bromwich Albion a week ago that some players had blown their chance of starting this FA Cup semi-final. “Some of the guys that played don’t have a place in that team,” the United manager said, simmering with indignation after a defeat that handed Manchester City the Premier League title only eight days after a dramatic comeback in the derby had delayed their rival’s coronation. And as if to ram home the message, he repeated his assertion. “They don’t have a place in that team.” Few had disappointed quite so acutely against the league’s bottom club on that chastening afternoon as Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez and, as Mourinho warned that he cared little for a player’s price tag or salary, nobody, certainly not that pair, seemed safe from the axe. If there was a temptation to drop one or even both of Pogba and Sanchez against Tottenham, though, it was a temptation Mourinho resisted, and as he watched his two most high-profile signings combine to kick-start a memorable comeback at Wembley, the Portuguese must have felt an acute sense of vindication. On an afternoon when Mourinho really needed his big guns to come up trumps, they rewarded his show of faith. Pogba and Sanchez have coughed and spluttered this year but, when United needed to get over the line, they answered their manager’s calling, and one need only quiz Mauricio Pochettino to recognise the difficulties incumbent in that. Once again on the big stage, Tottenham fell just short. Once again, there were more questions than answers for a club whose search for silverware goes on. Pogba and Sanchez combined to drag United level in the first half Credit: GETTY IMAGES For all the criticism levelled at Mourinho, this is one thing he unquestionably does so well. He finds a way. He makes his teams find a way. He is a manager who routinely gets over the line. Want a semi-final, a final, a big match won? Call Mourinho. It is one of the overwhelming reasons why United appointed him. It is not always pretty, although there was much to admire about the tenacity of this fightback and no little quality in the first goal Pogba created for Sanchez, but when it matters Mourinho has a trusty knack of delivering. Still, these were curious beginnings. Tottenham started with a bang, ahead after 11 minutes and well on top, and once again we were left wondering if there was a more Jekyll and Hyde footballer currently playing in the upper echelons of England’s top flight than Pogba. For 23 minutes, he gave us the infuriating version, the one you can’t quite be sure whether to take seriously, the one managers must want to throw tea cups at in the dressing room. What quite possessed him to amble half-heartedly in front of Tottenham’s creator-in-chief, Christian Eriksen, and open up a lovely space in behind for Davinson Sanchez to pump forward a long ball for the Dane to run on to and cross for Dele Alli to score perhaps only Pogba will know. Whatever the warped thought process, it is that sort of indiscipline and inability to sense danger that leaves the Frenchman so open to criticism, and it was not as if he could use the excuse here of being denied the self-protection a midfield three affords. He had that luxury. Soon after, he was indulging in the sort of “overcomplicated” football Mourinho had decried during the defeat to West Brom, losing possession from which Tottenham mounted a counter-attack that culminated in Son’s cross narrowly eluding Harry Kane. And then, as if a switch had been flicked in his head, Pogba started playing. Using that muscular frame to bundle Mousa Dembele off the ball, Pogba won possession deep in Tottenham’s half, looked up and floated a fine cross to the far post where Sanchez rose superbly to steer a controlled header past Michel Vorm. From ugly to beautiful as readily as he changes his hair colour. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings It does not necessarily make life any easier for a manager who cannot be sure which Pogba is going to turn up from one day to the next, particularly a manager such as Mourinho who has always favoured consistent, dependable types over flawed flair players. But it helps to explain why the Portuguese started with Pogba rather than exclude him following the West Brom shambles, when he was substituted 13 minutes into the second half. A man of the match showing in Wednesday’s 2-0 win over Bournemouth clearly went some way to appeasing Mourinho but Pogba still had much to prove. He still has but, as showcased in the second half against City, when he scored twice to inspire that 3-2 comeback, and here, he is worth the trouble, the effort. Reports this week have suggested Mourinho would listen to offers for Pogba in the summer but another look at his pass for Sanchez’s header might convince the manager he is worth the hassle. Sanchez? There were clear signs of his talent in the City game, not least his stunning pass for Pogba’s second goal, but West Brom marked several steps backwards. So could this goal finally mark a corner turned? Or rather, have there been enough signs – the goal against Swansea, three assists against City, a crucial intervention against Spurs – that the Chilean is finally finding his feet at United. Mourinho had warned early on that it would be next season before United fans saw the best of the Chilean but there have been glimpses of his obvious talent of late. The challenge for both Pogba and Sanchez is to ensure they deliver these sort of moments regularly, rather than flickering brightly one game and then disappearing for another three. For the moment, though, they should just savour the occasion. Mourinho certainly will.
Manchester United's chastened stars Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez rise to Jose Mourinho's challenge and the big occasion
Jose Mourinho had been pretty adamant in the wake of Manchester United’s meek surrender at home to West Bromwich Albion a week ago that some players had blown their chance of starting this FA Cup semi-final. “Some of the guys that played don’t have a place in that team,” the United manager said, simmering with indignation after a defeat that handed Manchester City the Premier League title only eight days after a dramatic comeback in the derby had delayed their rival’s coronation. And as if to ram home the message, he repeated his assertion. “They don’t have a place in that team.” Few had disappointed quite so acutely against the league’s bottom club on that chastening afternoon as Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez and, as Mourinho warned that he cared little for a player’s price tag or salary, nobody, certainly not that pair, seemed safe from the axe. If there was a temptation to drop one or even both of Pogba and Sanchez against Tottenham, though, it was a temptation Mourinho resisted, and as he watched his two most high-profile signings combine to kick-start a memorable comeback at Wembley, the Portuguese must have felt an acute sense of vindication. On an afternoon when Mourinho really needed his big guns to come up trumps, they rewarded his show of faith. Pogba and Sanchez have coughed and spluttered this year but, when United needed to get over the line, they answered their manager’s calling, and one need only quiz Mauricio Pochettino to recognise the difficulties incumbent in that. Once again on the big stage, Tottenham fell just short. Once again, there were more questions than answers for a club whose search for silverware goes on. Pogba and Sanchez combined to drag United level in the first half Credit: GETTY IMAGES For all the criticism levelled at Mourinho, this is one thing he unquestionably does so well. He finds a way. He makes his teams find a way. He is a manager who routinely gets over the line. Want a semi-final, a final, a big match won? Call Mourinho. It is one of the overwhelming reasons why United appointed him. It is not always pretty, although there was much to admire about the tenacity of this fightback and no little quality in the first goal Pogba created for Sanchez, but when it matters Mourinho has a trusty knack of delivering. Still, these were curious beginnings. Tottenham started with a bang, ahead after 11 minutes and well on top, and once again we were left wondering if there was a more Jekyll and Hyde footballer currently playing in the upper echelons of England’s top flight than Pogba. For 23 minutes, he gave us the infuriating version, the one you can’t quite be sure whether to take seriously, the one managers must want to throw tea cups at in the dressing room. What quite possessed him to amble half-heartedly in front of Tottenham’s creator-in-chief, Christian Eriksen, and open up a lovely space in behind for Davinson Sanchez to pump forward a long ball for the Dane to run on to and cross for Dele Alli to score perhaps only Pogba will know. Whatever the warped thought process, it is that sort of indiscipline and inability to sense danger that leaves the Frenchman so open to criticism, and it was not as if he could use the excuse here of being denied the self-protection a midfield three affords. He had that luxury. Soon after, he was indulging in the sort of “overcomplicated” football Mourinho had decried during the defeat to West Brom, losing possession from which Tottenham mounted a counter-attack that culminated in Son’s cross narrowly eluding Harry Kane. And then, as if a switch had been flicked in his head, Pogba started playing. Using that muscular frame to bundle Mousa Dembele off the ball, Pogba won possession deep in Tottenham’s half, looked up and floated a fine cross to the far post where Sanchez rose superbly to steer a controlled header past Michel Vorm. From ugly to beautiful as readily as he changes his hair colour. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings It does not necessarily make life any easier for a manager who cannot be sure which Pogba is going to turn up from one day to the next, particularly a manager such as Mourinho who has always favoured consistent, dependable types over flawed flair players. But it helps to explain why the Portuguese started with Pogba rather than exclude him following the West Brom shambles, when he was substituted 13 minutes into the second half. A man of the match showing in Wednesday’s 2-0 win over Bournemouth clearly went some way to appeasing Mourinho but Pogba still had much to prove. He still has but, as showcased in the second half against City, when he scored twice to inspire that 3-2 comeback, and here, he is worth the trouble, the effort. Reports this week have suggested Mourinho would listen to offers for Pogba in the summer but another look at his pass for Sanchez’s header might convince the manager he is worth the hassle. Sanchez? There were clear signs of his talent in the City game, not least his stunning pass for Pogba’s second goal, but West Brom marked several steps backwards. So could this goal finally mark a corner turned? Or rather, have there been enough signs – the goal against Swansea, three assists against City, a crucial intervention against Spurs – that the Chilean is finally finding his feet at United. Mourinho had warned early on that it would be next season before United fans saw the best of the Chilean but there have been glimpses of his obvious talent of late. The challenge for both Pogba and Sanchez is to ensure they deliver these sort of moments regularly, rather than flickering brightly one game and then disappearing for another three. For the moment, though, they should just savour the occasion. Mourinho certainly will.
Jose Mourinho had been pretty adamant in the wake of Manchester United’s meek surrender at home to West Bromwich Albion a week ago that some players had blown their chance of starting this FA Cup semi-final. “Some of the guys that played don’t have a place in that team,” the United manager said, simmering with indignation after a defeat that handed Manchester City the Premier League title only eight days after a dramatic comeback in the derby had delayed their rival’s coronation. And as if to ram home the message, he repeated his assertion. “They don’t have a place in that team.” Few had disappointed quite so acutely against the league’s bottom club on that chastening afternoon as Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez and, as Mourinho warned that he cared little for a player’s price tag or salary, nobody, certainly not that pair, seemed safe from the axe. If there was a temptation to drop one or even both of Pogba and Sanchez against Tottenham, though, it was a temptation Mourinho resisted, and as he watched his two most high-profile signings combine to kick-start a memorable comeback at Wembley, the Portuguese must have felt an acute sense of vindication. On an afternoon when Mourinho really needed his big guns to come up trumps, they rewarded his show of faith. Pogba and Sanchez have coughed and spluttered this year but, when United needed to get over the line, they answered their manager’s calling, and one need only quiz Mauricio Pochettino to recognise the difficulties incumbent in that. Once again on the big stage, Tottenham fell just short. Once again, there were more questions than answers for a club whose search for silverware goes on. Pogba and Sanchez combined to drag United level in the first half Credit: GETTY IMAGES For all the criticism levelled at Mourinho, this is one thing he unquestionably does so well. He finds a way. He makes his teams find a way. He is a manager who routinely gets over the line. Want a semi-final, a final, a big match won? Call Mourinho. It is one of the overwhelming reasons why United appointed him. It is not always pretty, although there was much to admire about the tenacity of this fightback and no little quality in the first goal Pogba created for Sanchez, but when it matters Mourinho has a trusty knack of delivering. Still, these were curious beginnings. Tottenham started with a bang, ahead after 11 minutes and well on top, and once again we were left wondering if there was a more Jekyll and Hyde footballer currently playing in the upper echelons of England’s top flight than Pogba. For 23 minutes, he gave us the infuriating version, the one you can’t quite be sure whether to take seriously, the one managers must want to throw tea cups at in the dressing room. What quite possessed him to amble half-heartedly in front of Tottenham’s creator-in-chief, Christian Eriksen, and open up a lovely space in behind for Davinson Sanchez to pump forward a long ball for the Dane to run on to and cross for Dele Alli to score perhaps only Pogba will know. Whatever the warped thought process, it is that sort of indiscipline and inability to sense danger that leaves the Frenchman so open to criticism, and it was not as if he could use the excuse here of being denied the self-protection a midfield three affords. He had that luxury. Soon after, he was indulging in the sort of “overcomplicated” football Mourinho had decried during the defeat to West Brom, losing possession from which Tottenham mounted a counter-attack that culminated in Son’s cross narrowly eluding Harry Kane. And then, as if a switch had been flicked in his head, Pogba started playing. Using that muscular frame to bundle Mousa Dembele off the ball, Pogba won possession deep in Tottenham’s half, looked up and floated a fine cross to the far post where Sanchez rose superbly to steer a controlled header past Michel Vorm. From ugly to beautiful as readily as he changes his hair colour. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings It does not necessarily make life any easier for a manager who cannot be sure which Pogba is going to turn up from one day to the next, particularly a manager such as Mourinho who has always favoured consistent, dependable types over flawed flair players. But it helps to explain why the Portuguese started with Pogba rather than exclude him following the West Brom shambles, when he was substituted 13 minutes into the second half. A man of the match showing in Wednesday’s 2-0 win over Bournemouth clearly went some way to appeasing Mourinho but Pogba still had much to prove. He still has but, as showcased in the second half against City, when he scored twice to inspire that 3-2 comeback, and here, he is worth the trouble, the effort. Reports this week have suggested Mourinho would listen to offers for Pogba in the summer but another look at his pass for Sanchez’s header might convince the manager he is worth the hassle. Sanchez? There were clear signs of his talent in the City game, not least his stunning pass for Pogba’s second goal, but West Brom marked several steps backwards. So could this goal finally mark a corner turned? Or rather, have there been enough signs – the goal against Swansea, three assists against City, a crucial intervention against Spurs – that the Chilean is finally finding his feet at United. Mourinho had warned early on that it would be next season before United fans saw the best of the Chilean but there have been glimpses of his obvious talent of late. The challenge for both Pogba and Sanchez is to ensure they deliver these sort of moments regularly, rather than flickering brightly one game and then disappearing for another three. For the moment, though, they should just savour the occasion. Mourinho certainly will.
Manchester United's chastened stars Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez rise to Jose Mourinho's challenge and the big occasion
Jose Mourinho had been pretty adamant in the wake of Manchester United’s meek surrender at home to West Bromwich Albion a week ago that some players had blown their chance of starting this FA Cup semi-final. “Some of the guys that played don’t have a place in that team,” the United manager said, simmering with indignation after a defeat that handed Manchester City the Premier League title only eight days after a dramatic comeback in the derby had delayed their rival’s coronation. And as if to ram home the message, he repeated his assertion. “They don’t have a place in that team.” Few had disappointed quite so acutely against the league’s bottom club on that chastening afternoon as Paul Pogba and Alexis Sanchez and, as Mourinho warned that he cared little for a player’s price tag or salary, nobody, certainly not that pair, seemed safe from the axe. If there was a temptation to drop one or even both of Pogba and Sanchez against Tottenham, though, it was a temptation Mourinho resisted, and as he watched his two most high-profile signings combine to kick-start a memorable comeback at Wembley, the Portuguese must have felt an acute sense of vindication. On an afternoon when Mourinho really needed his big guns to come up trumps, they rewarded his show of faith. Pogba and Sanchez have coughed and spluttered this year but, when United needed to get over the line, they answered their manager’s calling, and one need only quiz Mauricio Pochettino to recognise the difficulties incumbent in that. Once again on the big stage, Tottenham fell just short. Once again, there were more questions than answers for a club whose search for silverware goes on. Pogba and Sanchez combined to drag United level in the first half Credit: GETTY IMAGES For all the criticism levelled at Mourinho, this is one thing he unquestionably does so well. He finds a way. He makes his teams find a way. He is a manager who routinely gets over the line. Want a semi-final, a final, a big match won? Call Mourinho. It is one of the overwhelming reasons why United appointed him. It is not always pretty, although there was much to admire about the tenacity of this fightback and no little quality in the first goal Pogba created for Sanchez, but when it matters Mourinho has a trusty knack of delivering. Still, these were curious beginnings. Tottenham started with a bang, ahead after 11 minutes and well on top, and once again we were left wondering if there was a more Jekyll and Hyde footballer currently playing in the upper echelons of England’s top flight than Pogba. For 23 minutes, he gave us the infuriating version, the one you can’t quite be sure whether to take seriously, the one managers must want to throw tea cups at in the dressing room. What quite possessed him to amble half-heartedly in front of Tottenham’s creator-in-chief, Christian Eriksen, and open up a lovely space in behind for Davinson Sanchez to pump forward a long ball for the Dane to run on to and cross for Dele Alli to score perhaps only Pogba will know. Whatever the warped thought process, it is that sort of indiscipline and inability to sense danger that leaves the Frenchman so open to criticism, and it was not as if he could use the excuse here of being denied the self-protection a midfield three affords. He had that luxury. Soon after, he was indulging in the sort of “overcomplicated” football Mourinho had decried during the defeat to West Brom, losing possession from which Tottenham mounted a counter-attack that culminated in Son’s cross narrowly eluding Harry Kane. And then, as if a switch had been flicked in his head, Pogba started playing. Using that muscular frame to bundle Mousa Dembele off the ball, Pogba won possession deep in Tottenham’s half, looked up and floated a fine cross to the far post where Sanchez rose superbly to steer a controlled header past Michel Vorm. From ugly to beautiful as readily as he changes his hair colour. Manchester United vs Tottenham Hotspur player ratings It does not necessarily make life any easier for a manager who cannot be sure which Pogba is going to turn up from one day to the next, particularly a manager such as Mourinho who has always favoured consistent, dependable types over flawed flair players. But it helps to explain why the Portuguese started with Pogba rather than exclude him following the West Brom shambles, when he was substituted 13 minutes into the second half. A man of the match showing in Wednesday’s 2-0 win over Bournemouth clearly went some way to appeasing Mourinho but Pogba still had much to prove. He still has but, as showcased in the second half against City, when he scored twice to inspire that 3-2 comeback, and here, he is worth the trouble, the effort. Reports this week have suggested Mourinho would listen to offers for Pogba in the summer but another look at his pass for Sanchez’s header might convince the manager he is worth the hassle. Sanchez? There were clear signs of his talent in the City game, not least his stunning pass for Pogba’s second goal, but West Brom marked several steps backwards. So could this goal finally mark a corner turned? Or rather, have there been enough signs – the goal against Swansea, three assists against City, a crucial intervention against Spurs – that the Chilean is finally finding his feet at United. Mourinho had warned early on that it would be next season before United fans saw the best of the Chilean but there have been glimpses of his obvious talent of late. The challenge for both Pogba and Sanchez is to ensure they deliver these sort of moments regularly, rather than flickering brightly one game and then disappearing for another three. For the moment, though, they should just savour the occasion. Mourinho certainly will.
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford manager Javi Gracia acknowledges fans after the match Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford manager Javi Gracia acknowledges fans after the match Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs
Manchester United won the Premier League title by 11 points in Sir Alex Ferguson’s final campaign, the fifth championship he delivered in his final seven seasons in charge at Old Trafford. It would have been six from seven but for a dramatic stoppage-time strike from Sergio Aguero clinching Manchester City the 2011-12 title on goal difference. Arsenal appear resigned to finishing sixth in Arsene Wenger’s final season in what would be the worst league finish of his 22-year reign as manager. They are actually closer to bottom club West Bromwich Albion in point terms than Manchester City. Viewed solely in the context of those statistics, the next Arsenal manager’s impending inheritance looks vastly poorer to the one with which David Moyes was bequeathed at United when he succeeded Ferguson in 2013. Yet, scratch the surface and it is not unreasonable to suggest Wenger’s successor may be starting from a slightly higher base than Moyes. That is not to suggest the transition at Arsenal will be any less problematic than it has proved in Manchester but there are differences. There was almost an expectation of success among United fans. A generation of them had grown up accustomed to serial silverware. Once that first Premier League was secured in 1992-93, seasons without titles were short-lived, the longest drought running to three years between 2003 and 2006, during which time they still won the FA Cup and League Cup and acquired Cristiano Ronaldo and Wayne Rooney. The bar could not have been set much higher when Moyes arrived. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Of course, there is expectation at Arsenal but 13 years without a title has provided a sharp reality check for their supporters, few of whom are likely to get giddy at the thought of a sudden title charge when a halt to the gradual slide of recent years would constitute progress. Nor do Arsenal have the departure of an experienced chief executive at the same time as their manager to contend with. For all Moyes’s shortcomings, the transition process at Old Trafford was complicated by David Gill leaving along with Ferguson and handing the reins to Ed Woodward, a novice. Ivan Gazidis remains at Arsenal and at least has a leadership team with football expertise, something United’s hierarchical structure was frequently accused of lacking post-Ferguson. And then there are the respective squads. Whoever replaces Wenger will find a squad in need of surgery, but as much work as United’s squad required when Moyes pitched up? As curious as it may sound, probably not. Ferguson’s final title success was arguably the greatest monument to his remarkable powers, but several stars also aligned for the Scot that season. Robin van Persie miraculously stayed fit to lead the charge with 26 league goals in what would prove the Holland striker’s last hurrah as a world-class centre forward. Similarly, Rio Ferdinand put the ravages of numerous injuries behind him to excel for one last time in central defence. Paul Scholes staged an impressive last stand and other older stagers, from Patrice Evra and Nemanja Vidic to Ryan Giggs and Michael Carrick, were not the same again after that. At the same time, City were imploding under Roberto Mancini, while Chelsea had sacked Roberto Di Matteo in the November. Wenger&#39;s successor would inherit a less impressive squad than Moyes did at United in 2013 Credit: ACTION IMAGES Moyes came in and found a glut of experienced winners well into their 30s whose best days were behind them. Rooney was also on the wane and, below that, there was a largely underwhelming, mixed bag of players. There was a world class goalkeeper in the making in David de Gea but few others with the quality and age profile to get really excited about, and those weaknesses were exacerbated by a bungled first summer in the transfer market that Arsenal will hope and expect to avoid. There are plenty of players in Wenger’s current squad that Moyes would likely have found a place for. Crucially, and unlike United’s oldest heads in 2013 whom Moyes must have wished were a few years younger, most of Arsenal’s most experienced players still have plenty of life in them yet. Pierre Emerick-Aubameyang, Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan are the right side of 30. There is a pool of players between 23 and 27 with talent and something to prove (Hector Bellerin, Alexandre Lacazette, Sead Kolasinac, Danny Welbeck and Jack Wilshere among them) and one or two youngsters with promise coming through, not least Ainsley Maitland-Niles. An outstanding squad it is not, but there is a clear nucleus to build upon, something Moyes felt he lacked. Will it be enough to guarantee a smooth transition? No. But it is questionable to suggest Arsenal are in significantly worse shape than United were when Ferguson left.
Arsenal's post-Wenger transition may not be smooth but they have a solid base on which to rebuild
Manchester United won the Premier League title by 11 points in Sir Alex Ferguson’s final campaign, the fifth championship he delivered in his final seven seasons in charge at Old Trafford. It would have been six from seven but for a dramatic stoppage-time strike from Sergio Aguero clinching Manchester City the 2011-12 title on goal difference. Arsenal appear resigned to finishing sixth in Arsene Wenger’s final season in what would be the worst league finish of his 22-year reign as manager. They are actually closer to bottom club West Bromwich Albion in point terms than Manchester City. Viewed solely in the context of those statistics, the next Arsenal manager’s impending inheritance looks vastly poorer to the one with which David Moyes was bequeathed at United when he succeeded Ferguson in 2013. Yet, scratch the surface and it is not unreasonable to suggest Wenger’s successor may be starting from a slightly higher base than Moyes. That is not to suggest the transition at Arsenal will be any less problematic than it has proved in Manchester but there are differences. There was almost an expectation of success among United fans. A generation of them had grown up accustomed to serial silverware. Once that first Premier League was secured in 1992-93, seasons without titles were short-lived, the longest drought running to three years between 2003 and 2006, during which time they still won the FA Cup and League Cup and acquired Cristiano Ronaldo and Wayne Rooney. The bar could not have been set much higher when Moyes arrived. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Of course, there is expectation at Arsenal but 13 years without a title has provided a sharp reality check for their supporters, few of whom are likely to get giddy at the thought of a sudden title charge when a halt to the gradual slide of recent years would constitute progress. Nor do Arsenal have the departure of an experienced chief executive at the same time as their manager to contend with. For all Moyes’s shortcomings, the transition process at Old Trafford was complicated by David Gill leaving along with Ferguson and handing the reins to Ed Woodward, a novice. Ivan Gazidis remains at Arsenal and at least has a leadership team with football expertise, something United’s hierarchical structure was frequently accused of lacking post-Ferguson. And then there are the respective squads. Whoever replaces Wenger will find a squad in need of surgery, but as much work as United’s squad required when Moyes pitched up? As curious as it may sound, probably not. Ferguson’s final title success was arguably the greatest monument to his remarkable powers, but several stars also aligned for the Scot that season. Robin van Persie miraculously stayed fit to lead the charge with 26 league goals in what would prove the Holland striker’s last hurrah as a world-class centre forward. Similarly, Rio Ferdinand put the ravages of numerous injuries behind him to excel for one last time in central defence. Paul Scholes staged an impressive last stand and other older stagers, from Patrice Evra and Nemanja Vidic to Ryan Giggs and Michael Carrick, were not the same again after that. At the same time, City were imploding under Roberto Mancini, while Chelsea had sacked Roberto Di Matteo in the November. Wenger's successor would inherit a less impressive squad than Moyes did at United in 2013 Credit: ACTION IMAGES Moyes came in and found a glut of experienced winners well into their 30s whose best days were behind them. Rooney was also on the wane and, below that, there was a largely underwhelming, mixed bag of players. There was a world class goalkeeper in the making in David de Gea but few others with the quality and age profile to get really excited about, and those weaknesses were exacerbated by a bungled first summer in the transfer market that Arsenal will hope and expect to avoid. There are plenty of players in Wenger’s current squad that Moyes would likely have found a place for. Crucially, and unlike United’s oldest heads in 2013 whom Moyes must have wished were a few years younger, most of Arsenal’s most experienced players still have plenty of life in them yet. Pierre Emerick-Aubameyang, Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan are the right side of 30. There is a pool of players between 23 and 27 with talent and something to prove (Hector Bellerin, Alexandre Lacazette, Sead Kolasinac, Danny Welbeck and Jack Wilshere among them) and one or two youngsters with promise coming through, not least Ainsley Maitland-Niles. An outstanding squad it is not, but there is a clear nucleus to build upon, something Moyes felt he lacked. Will it be enough to guarantee a smooth transition? No. But it is questionable to suggest Arsenal are in significantly worse shape than United were when Ferguson left.
Manchester United won the Premier League title by 11 points in Sir Alex Ferguson’s final campaign, the fifth championship he delivered in his final seven seasons in charge at Old Trafford. It would have been six from seven but for a dramatic stoppage-time strike from Sergio Aguero clinching Manchester City the 2011-12 title on goal difference. Arsenal appear resigned to finishing sixth in Arsene Wenger’s final season in what would be the worst league finish of his 22-year reign as manager. They are actually closer to bottom club West Bromwich Albion in point terms than Manchester City. Viewed solely in the context of those statistics, the next Arsenal manager’s impending inheritance looks vastly poorer to the one with which David Moyes was bequeathed at United when he succeeded Ferguson in 2013. Yet, scratch the surface and it is not unreasonable to suggest Wenger’s successor may be starting from a slightly higher base than Moyes. That is not to suggest the transition at Arsenal will be any less problematic than it has proved in Manchester but there are differences. There was almost an expectation of success among United fans. A generation of them had grown up accustomed to serial silverware. Once that first Premier League was secured in 1992-93, seasons without titles were short-lived, the longest drought running to three years between 2003 and 2006, during which time they still won the FA Cup and League Cup and acquired Cristiano Ronaldo and Wayne Rooney. The bar could not have been set much higher when Moyes arrived. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Of course, there is expectation at Arsenal but 13 years without a title has provided a sharp reality check for their supporters, few of whom are likely to get giddy at the thought of a sudden title charge when a halt to the gradual slide of recent years would constitute progress. Nor do Arsenal have the departure of an experienced chief executive at the same time as their manager to contend with. For all Moyes’s shortcomings, the transition process at Old Trafford was complicated by David Gill leaving along with Ferguson and handing the reins to Ed Woodward, a novice. Ivan Gazidis remains at Arsenal and at least has a leadership team with football expertise, something United’s hierarchical structure was frequently accused of lacking post-Ferguson. And then there are the respective squads. Whoever replaces Wenger will find a squad in need of surgery, but as much work as United’s squad required when Moyes pitched up? As curious as it may sound, probably not. Ferguson’s final title success was arguably the greatest monument to his remarkable powers, but several stars also aligned for the Scot that season. Robin van Persie miraculously stayed fit to lead the charge with 26 league goals in what would prove the Holland striker’s last hurrah as a world-class centre forward. Similarly, Rio Ferdinand put the ravages of numerous injuries behind him to excel for one last time in central defence. Paul Scholes staged an impressive last stand and other older stagers, from Patrice Evra and Nemanja Vidic to Ryan Giggs and Michael Carrick, were not the same again after that. At the same time, City were imploding under Roberto Mancini, while Chelsea had sacked Roberto Di Matteo in the November. Wenger&#39;s successor would inherit a less impressive squad than Moyes did at United in 2013 Credit: ACTION IMAGES Moyes came in and found a glut of experienced winners well into their 30s whose best days were behind them. Rooney was also on the wane and, below that, there was a largely underwhelming, mixed bag of players. There was a world class goalkeeper in the making in David de Gea but few others with the quality and age profile to get really excited about, and those weaknesses were exacerbated by a bungled first summer in the transfer market that Arsenal will hope and expect to avoid. There are plenty of players in Wenger’s current squad that Moyes would likely have found a place for. Crucially, and unlike United’s oldest heads in 2013 whom Moyes must have wished were a few years younger, most of Arsenal’s most experienced players still have plenty of life in them yet. Pierre Emerick-Aubameyang, Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan are the right side of 30. There is a pool of players between 23 and 27 with talent and something to prove (Hector Bellerin, Alexandre Lacazette, Sead Kolasinac, Danny Welbeck and Jack Wilshere among them) and one or two youngsters with promise coming through, not least Ainsley Maitland-Niles. An outstanding squad it is not, but there is a clear nucleus to build upon, something Moyes felt he lacked. Will it be enough to guarantee a smooth transition? No. But it is questionable to suggest Arsenal are in significantly worse shape than United were when Ferguson left.
Arsenal's post-Wenger transition may not be smooth but they have a solid base on which to rebuild
Manchester United won the Premier League title by 11 points in Sir Alex Ferguson’s final campaign, the fifth championship he delivered in his final seven seasons in charge at Old Trafford. It would have been six from seven but for a dramatic stoppage-time strike from Sergio Aguero clinching Manchester City the 2011-12 title on goal difference. Arsenal appear resigned to finishing sixth in Arsene Wenger’s final season in what would be the worst league finish of his 22-year reign as manager. They are actually closer to bottom club West Bromwich Albion in point terms than Manchester City. Viewed solely in the context of those statistics, the next Arsenal manager’s impending inheritance looks vastly poorer to the one with which David Moyes was bequeathed at United when he succeeded Ferguson in 2013. Yet, scratch the surface and it is not unreasonable to suggest Wenger’s successor may be starting from a slightly higher base than Moyes. That is not to suggest the transition at Arsenal will be any less problematic than it has proved in Manchester but there are differences. There was almost an expectation of success among United fans. A generation of them had grown up accustomed to serial silverware. Once that first Premier League was secured in 1992-93, seasons without titles were short-lived, the longest drought running to three years between 2003 and 2006, during which time they still won the FA Cup and League Cup and acquired Cristiano Ronaldo and Wayne Rooney. The bar could not have been set much higher when Moyes arrived. Who will replace Arsene Wenger at Arsenal? Of course, there is expectation at Arsenal but 13 years without a title has provided a sharp reality check for their supporters, few of whom are likely to get giddy at the thought of a sudden title charge when a halt to the gradual slide of recent years would constitute progress. Nor do Arsenal have the departure of an experienced chief executive at the same time as their manager to contend with. For all Moyes’s shortcomings, the transition process at Old Trafford was complicated by David Gill leaving along with Ferguson and handing the reins to Ed Woodward, a novice. Ivan Gazidis remains at Arsenal and at least has a leadership team with football expertise, something United’s hierarchical structure was frequently accused of lacking post-Ferguson. And then there are the respective squads. Whoever replaces Wenger will find a squad in need of surgery, but as much work as United’s squad required when Moyes pitched up? As curious as it may sound, probably not. Ferguson’s final title success was arguably the greatest monument to his remarkable powers, but several stars also aligned for the Scot that season. Robin van Persie miraculously stayed fit to lead the charge with 26 league goals in what would prove the Holland striker’s last hurrah as a world-class centre forward. Similarly, Rio Ferdinand put the ravages of numerous injuries behind him to excel for one last time in central defence. Paul Scholes staged an impressive last stand and other older stagers, from Patrice Evra and Nemanja Vidic to Ryan Giggs and Michael Carrick, were not the same again after that. At the same time, City were imploding under Roberto Mancini, while Chelsea had sacked Roberto Di Matteo in the November. Wenger's successor would inherit a less impressive squad than Moyes did at United in 2013 Credit: ACTION IMAGES Moyes came in and found a glut of experienced winners well into their 30s whose best days were behind them. Rooney was also on the wane and, below that, there was a largely underwhelming, mixed bag of players. There was a world class goalkeeper in the making in David de Gea but few others with the quality and age profile to get really excited about, and those weaknesses were exacerbated by a bungled first summer in the transfer market that Arsenal will hope and expect to avoid. There are plenty of players in Wenger’s current squad that Moyes would likely have found a place for. Crucially, and unlike United’s oldest heads in 2013 whom Moyes must have wished were a few years younger, most of Arsenal’s most experienced players still have plenty of life in them yet. Pierre Emerick-Aubameyang, Mesut Ozil and Henrikh Mkhitaryan are the right side of 30. There is a pool of players between 23 and 27 with talent and something to prove (Hector Bellerin, Alexandre Lacazette, Sead Kolasinac, Danny Welbeck and Jack Wilshere among them) and one or two youngsters with promise coming through, not least Ainsley Maitland-Niles. An outstanding squad it is not, but there is a clear nucleus to build upon, something Moyes felt he lacked. Will it be enough to guarantee a smooth transition? No. But it is questionable to suggest Arsenal are in significantly worse shape than United were when Ferguson left.
Julian Nagelsmann wurde zuletzt immer wieder mit der Premier League in Verbindung gebracht. Nun hat sich der Hoffenheim-Coach geäußert.
Hoffenheims Julian Nagelsmann dementiert Kontakt zu Arsenal und Chelsea: "Es sind Gerüchte"
Julian Nagelsmann wurde zuletzt immer wieder mit der Premier League in Verbindung gebracht. Nun hat sich der Hoffenheim-Coach geäußert.
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford manager Javi Gracia and Crystal Palace manager Roy Hodgson REUTERS/Darren Staples
Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace
Soccer Football - Premier League - Watford v Crystal Palace - Vicarage Road, Watford, Britain - April 21, 2018 Watford manager Javi Gracia and Crystal Palace manager Roy Hodgson REUTERS/Darren Staples

Qué leer a continuación