Futbol inglés

Las mejores imágenes de la Premier League

Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Man Utd learn Boateng price
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Manchester City have finally agreed a deal with Napoli for Jorginho worth an initial £43.1 million after weeks of protracted negotiations with the Italian club. The Premier League champions are hopeful of completing the transfer in the coming days and it is thought the fee could rise up to £48.3 million with add ons. Napoli had been holding out for around £50 million for the Brazil-born Italy midfielder but City were reluctant to go that high, despite Pep Guardiola’s eagerness to sign the 26-year-old. City switched their attention to Jorginho after backing out of a move for Brazil midfielder Fred, who has agreed to join Manchester United, and Guardiola is confident he will provide quality competition for Fernandinho in the defensive midfield role following the departure of Yaya Toure. Napoli are already on the verge of signing Fabian Ruiz from Real Betis after meeting the £26.4 million release clause in the Spain Under-21 midfielder’s contract. Ruiz flew into Naples yesterday (Wednesday) ahead of a medical and has agreed a five-year deal. City are also signing highly rated 17-year-old midfielder, Adria Bernabe, from Barcelona.
Manchester City agree Jorginho deal with Napoli for initial £43.1m
Manchester City have finally agreed a deal with Napoli for Jorginho worth an initial £43.1 million after weeks of protracted negotiations with the Italian club. The Premier League champions are hopeful of completing the transfer in the coming days and it is thought the fee could rise up to £48.3 million with add ons. Napoli had been holding out for around £50 million for the Brazil-born Italy midfielder but City were reluctant to go that high, despite Pep Guardiola’s eagerness to sign the 26-year-old. City switched their attention to Jorginho after backing out of a move for Brazil midfielder Fred, who has agreed to join Manchester United, and Guardiola is confident he will provide quality competition for Fernandinho in the defensive midfield role following the departure of Yaya Toure. Napoli are already on the verge of signing Fabian Ruiz from Real Betis after meeting the £26.4 million release clause in the Spain Under-21 midfielder’s contract. Ruiz flew into Naples yesterday (Wednesday) ahead of a medical and has agreed a five-year deal. City are also signing highly rated 17-year-old midfielder, Adria Bernabe, from Barcelona.
A concussion row erupted at a second successive World Cup on Wednesday after a player returned to action five days after being in hospital. Morocco made a mockery of Fifa protocol on head injuries by picking Watford winger Nordin Amrabat against Portugal in defiance of guidelines that concussed players should not return for six days. The 31-year-old, taken off in his country’s loss to Iran after a 72nd-minute clash of heads with Vahid Amiri on Friday, even began the game in protective headgear which he soon discarded, drawing condemnation from the world players’ union, FifPro, and brain-injury experts. The chairman of Fifa’s medical committee, Michel D’Hooghe, announced he would seek an explanation from Morocco’s team doctor about the decision to allow Amrabat to play. But the controversy also raised serious questions about whether the governing body’s protocol – debuting in Russia four years after a string of concussion incidents in Brazil – was fit for purpose and needed to become a rule with concrete sanctions. Amrabat, who spent one night in hospital after Friday’s game, revealed he had defied doctor’s orders by playing yesterday. “I am my own doctor,” he declared before admitting he hoped he had not done himself any “long-term” damage. He also disclosed he was suffering from memory loss in what was an alarming echo of comments made by Christoph Kramer after the Germany midfielder collapsed during the last World Cup final. Amrabat said: “From the first minute, ’til I wake up in the hospital. I think five, six hours, gone. Totally gone. When you think about it, it is a little bit scary.” World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage Manager Herve Renard defended his decision to pick the player, saying: “He’s a warrior; he wanted to play. It’s because his spirit is amazing and I was lucky to have a player like this. “I’m not a doctor. Medical reports are read by competent people. I’m not competent in medical matters. They take their own responsibilities and so does the player, and I think he’s shown that he’s done an exceptional and outstanding match.” Team doctor Abderrazak Hifti confirmed this week that Amrabat had shown “clear symptoms of cerebral concussion” against Iran in an interview to counter criticism medics had responded by spraying him with water and slapping him around the face. That was after D’Hooghe wrote to the Moroccan Football Federation to express his “shock” that the correct guidelines had not been followed. The former Fifa executive committee member said on Wednesday: “I will now ask for an explanation from the Moroccan team doctor about what has happened so that he played again today. “Fifa has no authority over this – we produce the guidelines but it is the team doctors who make the decision.” How to predict a World Cup winner FifPro’s head of communications, Andrew Orsatti, posted on Twitter: “Here we go again. Four years on from debacle of the last #WorldCup, where several players didn’t receive adequate care, football has not made sufficient progress in #concussion management. Repeated calls to implement world-class standards all overlooked.” Dr Willie Stewart, the man heading a Football Association and Professional Footballers’ Association study into the long-term impact of head trauma in the game, posted: “Surely this can’t be happening, but if it is presumably @FIFAWorldCup @FIFAcom have means to sanction actions that threaten player welfare.” The chief executive of brain-injury association Headway, Peter McCabe, said: “On the face of it, this appears to be a scant disregard for Fifa’s concussion protocols. The decision to allow this player to take to the field not only put his short and long-term health and career at risk but it also set an appalling example for the millions of fans and players around the world. Russia World Cup in pictures: Best photos of teams, games and players “Fifa must act – and act decisively – in order to send a clear message that breaches of this vital safety protocol will not be tolerated. It would also be very helpful to understand why the player was wearing a protective head cap. “It is important that people are not given the false impression that they can play a role in reducing the chances of sustaining a concussion.” Fifa last week ruled out “concussion bins” being introduced to football after The Daily Telegraph exclusively revealed that Premier League doctors were pushing for teams to be allowed to make temporary substitutions for up to 10 minutes while players who take a blow to the head are assessed by medics. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Concussion row breaks out at World Cup as Morocco field Nordin Amrabat five days after head injury
A concussion row erupted at a second successive World Cup on Wednesday after a player returned to action five days after being in hospital. Morocco made a mockery of Fifa protocol on head injuries by picking Watford winger Nordin Amrabat against Portugal in defiance of guidelines that concussed players should not return for six days. The 31-year-old, taken off in his country’s loss to Iran after a 72nd-minute clash of heads with Vahid Amiri on Friday, even began the game in protective headgear which he soon discarded, drawing condemnation from the world players’ union, FifPro, and brain-injury experts. The chairman of Fifa’s medical committee, Michel D’Hooghe, announced he would seek an explanation from Morocco’s team doctor about the decision to allow Amrabat to play. But the controversy also raised serious questions about whether the governing body’s protocol – debuting in Russia four years after a string of concussion incidents in Brazil – was fit for purpose and needed to become a rule with concrete sanctions. Amrabat, who spent one night in hospital after Friday’s game, revealed he had defied doctor’s orders by playing yesterday. “I am my own doctor,” he declared before admitting he hoped he had not done himself any “long-term” damage. He also disclosed he was suffering from memory loss in what was an alarming echo of comments made by Christoph Kramer after the Germany midfielder collapsed during the last World Cup final. Amrabat said: “From the first minute, ’til I wake up in the hospital. I think five, six hours, gone. Totally gone. When you think about it, it is a little bit scary.” World Cup 2018 | The best of the Telegraph's coverage Manager Herve Renard defended his decision to pick the player, saying: “He’s a warrior; he wanted to play. It’s because his spirit is amazing and I was lucky to have a player like this. “I’m not a doctor. Medical reports are read by competent people. I’m not competent in medical matters. They take their own responsibilities and so does the player, and I think he’s shown that he’s done an exceptional and outstanding match.” Team doctor Abderrazak Hifti confirmed this week that Amrabat had shown “clear symptoms of cerebral concussion” against Iran in an interview to counter criticism medics had responded by spraying him with water and slapping him around the face. That was after D’Hooghe wrote to the Moroccan Football Federation to express his “shock” that the correct guidelines had not been followed. The former Fifa executive committee member said on Wednesday: “I will now ask for an explanation from the Moroccan team doctor about what has happened so that he played again today. “Fifa has no authority over this – we produce the guidelines but it is the team doctors who make the decision.” How to predict a World Cup winner FifPro’s head of communications, Andrew Orsatti, posted on Twitter: “Here we go again. Four years on from debacle of the last #WorldCup, where several players didn’t receive adequate care, football has not made sufficient progress in #concussion management. Repeated calls to implement world-class standards all overlooked.” Dr Willie Stewart, the man heading a Football Association and Professional Footballers’ Association study into the long-term impact of head trauma in the game, posted: “Surely this can’t be happening, but if it is presumably @FIFAWorldCup @FIFAcom have means to sanction actions that threaten player welfare.” The chief executive of brain-injury association Headway, Peter McCabe, said: “On the face of it, this appears to be a scant disregard for Fifa’s concussion protocols. The decision to allow this player to take to the field not only put his short and long-term health and career at risk but it also set an appalling example for the millions of fans and players around the world. Russia World Cup in pictures: Best photos of teams, games and players “Fifa must act – and act decisively – in order to send a clear message that breaches of this vital safety protocol will not be tolerated. It would also be very helpful to understand why the player was wearing a protective head cap. “It is important that people are not given the false impression that they can play a role in reducing the chances of sustaining a concussion.” Fifa last week ruled out “concussion bins” being introduced to football after The Daily Telegraph exclusively revealed that Premier League doctors were pushing for teams to be allowed to make temporary substitutions for up to 10 minutes while players who take a blow to the head are assessed by medics. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Fabia�ski odchodzi ze Swansea. Zostaje w Premier League
Fabia�ski odchodzi ze Swansea. Zostaje w Premier League
Fabia�ski odchodzi ze Swansea. Zostaje w Premier League
While talks continue around Leicester's Riyad Mahrez, the Premier League champions are hoping to announce the capture of the Brazilian midfielder
Man City close on £50m deal for Napoli star Jorginho
While talks continue around Leicester's Riyad Mahrez, the Premier League champions are hoping to announce the capture of the Brazilian midfielder
FILE PHOTO - Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Liverpool - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - January 1, 2018 General view of a corner flag before the match Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
Premier League - Burnley vs Liverpool
FILE PHOTO - Soccer Football - Premier League - Burnley vs Liverpool - Turf Moor, Burnley, Britain - January 1, 2018 General view of a corner flag before the match Action Images via Reuters/Jason Cairnduff
The former goal king says the hiatus in the top-flight may affect his chances of playing in Europe this summer
Indefinite suspension on Ghana Premier League affecting players, says Asamoah
The former goal king says the hiatus in the top-flight may affect his chances of playing in Europe this summer
Scottish Premier League side Aberdeen will host Burnley in the club's first European trip for over 50 years.
No passports required - Burnley's 51-year wait for European tie sees Clarets draw... Aberdeen
Scottish Premier League side Aberdeen will host Burnley in the club's first European trip for over 50 years.
They arent in the Premier League any more, but they are in Russia this summer its the ex-top flight stars who feature in World Cup squads
Quiz! Can you name the 50 highest-appearing FORMER Premier League players at the 2018 World Cup?
They arent in the Premier League any more, but they are in Russia this summer its the ex-top flight stars who feature in World Cup squads
Bert van Marwijk is often reluctant to single players out for praise but he believes Aaron Mooy could reach a bigger Premier League club.
Mooy can play at a higher level, says Socceroos boss Van Marwijk
Bert van Marwijk is often reluctant to single players out for praise but he believes Aaron Mooy could reach a bigger Premier League club.
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
West Ham confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for club-record £35m fee
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
West Ham confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for club-record £35m fee
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
West Ham confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for club-record £35m fee
West Ham United are increasingly confident of signing Lazio winger Felipe Anderson for a club-record fee which could be as high as £35 million. Talks have progressed between West Ham and Anderson’s representatives with one source close to the deal saying there is now a “big chance” that it will be completed. It comes after West Ham announced their third signing after appointing Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager with the confirmation that goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski has been acquired from relegated Swansea City for £7m on a three-year contract. Having signed the 33 year-old, who is at the World Cup with Poland, West Ham are also continuing to hold talks for another Swansea player, Alfie Mawson. West Ham had been searching for a replacement for Joe Hart following the end of his loan spell from Premier League champions Manchester City and targeted Fabianski, who is Swansea’s current player of the year. "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level," said West Ham’s new director of football Mario Husillos. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position." Lukasz Fabianski has signed for West Ham Credit: getty images West Ham also have Adrian who played much of last season after Hart was dropped. In a sign of their ambition - and wanting to get deals done quickly - West Ham have also completed the signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for £22m on a five-year deal. The 21 year-old is a France Under-21 international and was club captain at his hometown club. West Ham have also brought in Ryan Fredericks from newly-promoted Fulham, on a four-year contract, after he became a free agent. Issa Diop has his West Ham medical Credit: getty images However, it will be the signing of Anderson which will excite the West Ham fans. The 25-year-old right-winger scored four goals and provided seven assists in 21 appearances in Serie A last season and also scored three times in the Italian club’s Europa League campaign. Anderson has been capped by Brazil and was signed from the Brazilian club Santos by Lazio for £6.75m in 2015 and has been scouted by a number of leading clubs, including those in the Premier League.
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Man Utd, Chelsea & PSG eye Asensio
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
The Serie A club have confirmed that their 22-year-old midfielder will leave for the Premier League once the World Cup has finished
Sampdoria chief confirms Torreira's €30m Arsenal transfer
The Serie A club have confirmed that their 22-year-old midfielder will leave for the Premier League once the World Cup has finished
The experienced Poland international has moved to London Stadium following Swansea's relegation from the Premier League
West Ham sign Swansea goalkeeper Fabianski for £7m
The experienced Poland international has moved to London Stadium following Swansea's relegation from the Premier League
The former USMNT head coach says the teen should ignore talk of a Premier League move and instead stay at his current club
Pulisic in right place at Dortmund, says Arena
The former USMNT head coach says the teen should ignore talk of a Premier League move and instead stay at his current club
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What England can expect from Panama... one or two bruises for a start
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What England can expect from Panama... one or two bruises for a start
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What England can expect from Panama... one or two bruises for a start
Panama are nothing if not physical, although it should probably be pointed out that the worst tackle in their 3-0 defeat to Belgium was actually made by Kevin De Bruyne two minutes from time, for which the Manchester City midfielder was booked. Roberto Martinez, the Belgium coach, was distinctly unhappy afterwards with the treatment Eden Hazard got and goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois talked about a need for referees to clamp down on the “cheap and unnecessary tackles” he felt Panama administered. The Panama defenders, Roman Torres and Michael Murillo, both received yellow cards for strong challenges on Hazard. But was this really that different from what the Chelsea forward gets in the Premier League most weeks? Most of the bookings Panama racked up - five inside an hour, the most by a team in a single game at a World Cup since Holland hacked lumps out of Spain in the 2010 final - were a consequence of clumsiness and difficulties dealing with the speed of their opponents than anything more sinister. Belgium only committed one tackle fewer than Panama’s 18. “I don’t know what people are complaining about,” Roman Torres, the Panama centre-half, said. “Football is like that - you always have to impose yourself, you have to mark out your territory.” World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more A lot of huff and puff... but a lack of mobility The spine of Panama’s team is ageing. Goalkeeper Jaime Penedo is 36, captain Torres 32, midfield sentry Gabriel Gomez 34 and, up front, Blas Perez is the oldest of the lot at 37. There was certainly a chronic lack of pace and mobility in the Panama ranks against Belgium but they strive to make up for that with a strong work ethic and upbeat attitude. The surprise in the first half, before Belgium’s superior quality told in the second, was the difficulty Martinez’s men had creating a numerical advantage in midfield, which led to a lot of long balls being pumped from defence and Hazard having to go it alone at times. If England can create overloads, Panama will be in trouble. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game No shortage of confidence but a lack of ideas going forward Panama may be one of the weakest teams in the tournament but their pride at reaching a first World Cup shines through and there is no shortage of confidence that they can beat or at least frustrate England. There is a clear belief in their ranks that Belgium would provide their stiffest test in Group G so England are likely to encounter opponents determined to cause an upset. Gareth Southgate’s side must show that confidence is misplaced. “For me, Belgium are a more difficult opponent than England,” midfielder Jose Luis Rodriguez said. That belief was echoed by the Panama president, who is in regular conversation with the squad and coach Hernan Gomez. “We feel the hard game was today’s,” Juan Carlos Varela said of the Belgium match as he looked ahead to England. Jose Luis Rodriguez (left) says Belgium are better than England Credit: afp That is all very well but Panama would have to show a lot more wit and imagination once they cross their own half-way line than they managed against Belgium. The one time they did get in behind Belgium, Courtois was off his line quick to deny Murillo. It was not as if Panama ventured forward enough to pose a threat from set pieces either. They had three corners in total against Belgium and no direct or indirect free-kicks near goal. A susceptibility on the counter-attack Whoever Southgate decides to pick, it is imperative England’s attack is flush with pace. Whether it is Raheem Sterling, Marcus Rashford or Jamie Vardy supplementing Harry Kane, or perhaps two of them, Panama are susceptible to pace on the break and England should have plenty of joy if they can get in behind their opponents. For a team that defend in numbers, Panama still left a lot of space for Belgium to exploit. They also tired visibly in the final half an hour so, if things are not going to plan for Southgate, as they were not for Martinez for a good while, the likelihood is space will eventually start to open up. Belgium’s third goal on the counter had begun with De Bruyne intercepting deep in Belgium territory but Panama were unable to deal with the speed with which Belgium then went through the gears. Eden Hazard breaks through the Panama defence Credit: getty images A robust centre-half pairing Torres plays his football with the Seattle Sounders in the MLS and Fidel Escobar also plies his trade in the US with New York Red Bulls. Neither are going to challenge the best central-defensive pairings at this tournament but they impressed in the first half against Belgium especially and coped well, at that stage, with what Romelu Lukaku had to offer. Torres made a crucial clearance from a dangerous De Bruyne cross and Escobar cut a fairly composed figure for a 23 year-old playing on the biggest stage of his life. Kane should still fancy his chances, though. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
Premier League transfer round-up: Wilshere out, Leno in at Arsenal
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
Premier League transfer round-up: Wilshere out, Leno in at Arsenal
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
Premier League transfer round-up: Wilshere out, Leno in at Arsenal
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
Premier League transfer round-up: Wilshere out, Leno in at Arsenal
A round-up of the latest gossip and signings in the Premier League transfer window.
Der frühere englische Nationalspieler Rio Ferdinand hat Joachim Löw dafür kritisiert, dass er Leroy Sane von Manchester City nicht in den DFB-Kader für die WM in Russland berufen hat. "Der beste Nachwuchsspieler der Premier League ist nicht bei der WM dabei. Das gibt es nicht, das verstehe ich nicht, das macht keinen Sinn", sagte der 39-Jährige der Sport Bild .
DFB-Team: England-Legende kritisiert Löw wegen Sane
Der frühere englische Nationalspieler Rio Ferdinand hat Joachim Löw dafür kritisiert, dass er Leroy Sane von Manchester City nicht in den DFB-Kader für die WM in Russland berufen hat. "Der beste Nachwuchsspieler der Premier League ist nicht bei der WM dabei. Das gibt es nicht, das verstehe ich nicht, das macht keinen Sinn", sagte der 39-Jährige der Sport Bild .
Kalidou Koulibaly, the Senegal and Napoli defender, has effectively confirmed that Maurizio Sarri will be Chelsea manager after delivering a ringing endorsement of his work in Naples. Speaking after Senegal’s 2-1 win against Poland on Tuesday night, Koulibaly stressed that Sarri would need time at Chelsea but is confident that he will ultimately deliver exciting football. “You can expect nice football because he's a very good coach,” said Koulibaly. “It's disappointing that he leaves like this. We have now a big coach and we know we can win something with him. I hope he can win something with Chelsea. “When a person like this comes, he needs time. They have to give him time because he will suit the football of Chelsea. I think Chelsea fans will enjoy the style of football he plays. At Napoli, we enjoyed so much the play and the supporters enjoyed so much too. I think at Chelsea it will be the same.” Chelsea are now close to confirming the appointment of Sarri, who has been Napoli manager for the past three season, and it is also believed that he is keen on the idea of having club favourite Gianfranco Zola with him. Premier League club-by-club review Zola would be a popular appointment with both the fans and a number of members of Chelsea’s first-team squad, and there is likely to be space for him either on the coaching or technical side. The former West Ham striker Diafro Sakho, who is now at Rennes, also predicted that Senegal or another African team were still good enough to win this World Cup. Senegal’s victory was the first by an African country following defeats for Tunisia, Egypt, Nigeria and Morocco. “We need to be together if the African continent is going to win a World Cup,” said Sakho. “It's a very important job for us to keep it this way, to play together. It's time now to give us all in Africa one opportunity to win a World Cup.”
Chelsea fans will enjoy the style of football Maurizio Sarri plays, says Kalidou Koulibaly
Kalidou Koulibaly, the Senegal and Napoli defender, has effectively confirmed that Maurizio Sarri will be Chelsea manager after delivering a ringing endorsement of his work in Naples. Speaking after Senegal’s 2-1 win against Poland on Tuesday night, Koulibaly stressed that Sarri would need time at Chelsea but is confident that he will ultimately deliver exciting football. “You can expect nice football because he's a very good coach,” said Koulibaly. “It's disappointing that he leaves like this. We have now a big coach and we know we can win something with him. I hope he can win something with Chelsea. “When a person like this comes, he needs time. They have to give him time because he will suit the football of Chelsea. I think Chelsea fans will enjoy the style of football he plays. At Napoli, we enjoyed so much the play and the supporters enjoyed so much too. I think at Chelsea it will be the same.” Chelsea are now close to confirming the appointment of Sarri, who has been Napoli manager for the past three season, and it is also believed that he is keen on the idea of having club favourite Gianfranco Zola with him. Premier League club-by-club review Zola would be a popular appointment with both the fans and a number of members of Chelsea’s first-team squad, and there is likely to be space for him either on the coaching or technical side. The former West Ham striker Diafro Sakho, who is now at Rennes, also predicted that Senegal or another African team were still good enough to win this World Cup. Senegal’s victory was the first by an African country following defeats for Tunisia, Egypt, Nigeria and Morocco. “We need to be together if the African continent is going to win a World Cup,” said Sakho. “It's a very important job for us to keep it this way, to play together. It's time now to give us all in Africa one opportunity to win a World Cup.”
Even before his formal appointment, Chelsea's new manager has submitted his list of demands, while Pep Guardiola is looking for reinforcements in order to defend their Premier League title. Juventus are trying to keep Barcelona and Real Madrid off their midfield ace Pjanic and Marco Asensio is the most wanted player across Europe. Here are the top transfer rumors and news.
Football transfers: Movers and shakers of the market
Even before his formal appointment, Chelsea's new manager has submitted his list of demands, while Pep Guardiola is looking for reinforcements in order to defend their Premier League title. Juventus are trying to keep Barcelona and Real Madrid off their midfield ace Pjanic and Marco Asensio is the most wanted player across Europe. Here are the top transfer rumors and news.
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Young players find it harder to secure a first team spot in today's game
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Young players find it harder to secure a first team spot in today's game
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Young players find it harder to secure a first team spot in today's game
Premier league legend Tony Cottee warns it is hard for youngsters to get their big break and even when they do it could lead to then getting burned out quickly.
Soccer Football - Premier League - Swansea City vs Stoke City - Liberty Stadium, Swansea, Britain - May 13, 2018 Swansea City's Lukasz Fabianski applauds their fans after the match as they are relegated from the Premier League Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra/Files
Premier League - Swansea City vs Stoke City
Soccer Football - Premier League - Swansea City vs Stoke City - Liberty Stadium, Swansea, Britain - May 13, 2018 Swansea City's Lukasz Fabianski applauds their fans after the match as they are relegated from the Premier League Action Images via Reuters/Peter Cziborra/Files
FILE PHOTO - Soccer Football - Premier League - Huddersfield Town vs Swansea City - John Smith’s Stadium, Huddersfield, Britain - March 10, 2018 Swansea City's Lukasz Fabianski REUTERS/Phil Noble
Premier League - Huddersfield Town vs Swansea City
FILE PHOTO - Soccer Football - Premier League - Huddersfield Town vs Swansea City - John Smith’s Stadium, Huddersfield, Britain - March 10, 2018 Swansea City's Lukasz Fabianski REUTERS/Phil Noble
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
The 32: Premier League legend Tony Cottee on why it's easier to get a England cap nowadays
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
The 32 ep7: Premier League legend Tony Cottee on why it's easier to get a England cap nowadays
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
The 32: Premier League legend Tony Cottee on why it's easier to get a England cap nowadays
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
The 32: Premier League legend Tony Cottee on why it's easier to get a England cap nowadays
Tony Cottee says that it is easier today to get a cap for England in today's game on episode 7 of Yahoo's daily World Cup The 32.
The experienced Poland international has moved to London Stadium following Swansea's relegation from the Premier League
West Ham sign Swansea goalkeeper Fabianski for £7m
The experienced Poland international has moved to London Stadium following Swansea's relegation from the Premier League
West Ham United have announced the signing of Poland goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski from Swansea City. Fabianski, 33, joins West Ham on a three-year deal for an undisclosed fee following the Welsh club's relegation from the Premier League. "West Ham is a massive club so I'm really happy to be joining at such an exciting time here," said former Arsenal goalkeeper on the West Ham website. "I will do my best on and off the pitch to help the team to achieve the best results possible and can't wait to start this new chapter of my career." His transfer follows the club-record signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for a club-record fee, reported to be £22 million, and full-back Ryan Fredericks from Fulham. Premier League club-by-club review Fabianski, who is currently at the World Cup with Poland, looks set to compete with Spaniard Adrian as new West Ham manager Manuel Pellegrini reshapes his squad. West Ham director of football Mario Husillos said: "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position."
West Ham sign Poland goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski from Swansea City
West Ham United have announced the signing of Poland goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski from Swansea City. Fabianski, 33, joins West Ham on a three-year deal for an undisclosed fee following the Welsh club's relegation from the Premier League. "West Ham is a massive club so I'm really happy to be joining at such an exciting time here," said former Arsenal goalkeeper on the West Ham website. "I will do my best on and off the pitch to help the team to achieve the best results possible and can't wait to start this new chapter of my career." His transfer follows the club-record signing of defender Issa Diop from Toulouse for a club-record fee, reported to be £22 million, and full-back Ryan Fredericks from Fulham. Premier League club-by-club review Fabianski, who is currently at the World Cup with Poland, looks set to compete with Spaniard Adrian as new West Ham manager Manuel Pellegrini reshapes his squad. West Ham director of football Mario Husillos said: "Lukasz is an experienced and established Premier League goalkeeper, with great quality that he has shown at both domestic and international level. "He fits perfectly the mould of the modern goalkeeper, with excellent agility, presence and distribution, and will bring strong competition to the position."
The Serie A club have confirmed that their 22-year-old midfielder will leave for the Premier League once the World Cup has finished
Sampdoria chief confirms Torreira's €30m Arsenal transfer
The Serie A club have confirmed that their 22-year-old midfielder will leave for the Premier League once the World Cup has finished
Rio Ferdinand kritisiert Joachim Löw für die Nicht-Nominierung Leroy Sanes. Dem ManCity-Profi prophezeit er eine steile Entwicklung.
Rio Ferdinand: "Leroy Sane wird der beste Spieler der Premier League"
Rio Ferdinand kritisiert Joachim Löw für die Nicht-Nominierung Leroy Sanes. Dem ManCity-Profi prophezeit er eine steile Entwicklung.
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What is VAR, what are the rules, and how is it being used at the 2018 World Cup?
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What is VAR, what are the rules, and how is it being used at the 2018 World Cup?
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
What is VAR, what are the rules, and how is it being used at the 2018 World Cup?
'What is VAR - and what does it stand for? The Video Assistant Referee system, known as VAR, is football's first use of video technology to reach more correct decisions. The system was trialled in the FA and Carabao Cups last season, as well as the German and Italian leagues. The system has already been used in the World Cup group stage to correct and clarify decisions, including Diego Costa's first goal against Portugal, France's penalty against Australia as well as Sweden's penalty against South Korea. Is it being used at the World Cup? Yes, following the unanimous approval of the International Football Association Board in Zurich in March, who voted to introduce the system permanently. This is the first World Cup using video replays, although goal line technology was successfully employed in Brazil four years ago. What are the rules of VAR being used? VAR only intervenes in the course of a match when the officials have made a 'clear and obvious error' in one of four key areas. Goals A close offside decision is the most common reason for VAR being consulted after a goal has been scored, but shirt-pulling and other infringements can cause goals to be chalked off. The Var room at the official World Cup broadcast center Credit: Getty Images NB. The concept of 'clear and obvious' errors does not apply to offsides. A player is either onside or offside - you cannot be a little bit pregnant. So even if a player is offside by a matter of inches, the goal will be ruled out. Penalties The most subjective and arguably problematic area. Penalties can be awarded or rescinded using VAR if there has been a 'clear and obvious error' in the original decision. Straight red cards Violent conduct and dangerous tackles can be penalised using VAR. Second-yellow cards cannot. Mistaken identity If the referee sends off the wrong player, such as the famous incident with Kieran Gibbs and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain in Arsenal's 6-0 drubbing at Chelsea in 2014, that injustice can be repaired. The system is restricted to these areas in order to minimise disruption to the flow of the game. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more Is there a time limit on decisions using VAR? Not as such, but VAR cannot be used for an incident once play has restarted after being stopped. So if a VAR fails to spot and flag up something prior to a free-kick, goal-kick, throw-in, corner-kick etc, it is too late. Goals can also only be disallowed using VAR if something is amiss in the attacking move which leads to it being scored, not during the longer build-up period. However.... New Fifa regulations do give referees the power, backed by VAR, could in theory lead to players being retrospectively punished at half-time for incidents that were missed. Likely to prove controversial. test - do not delete Where are the video referees? They watch the match in a remote location, with access to dozen of camera angles and are miked up to the on-pitch officials so they can alert them to any mistakes. Officials watch replays and review incidents from a remote location Credit: Getty Images How will it work in practice? There are three ways VAR can play out during the game: The video referee speaks to the on-field referee through an earpiece, who will put his hand up to pause play and inform the players a decision is being reviewed. If satisfied there is no error, he will signal for play to re-start. VAR decides. In this instance the referee will draw a rectangle with his arms to replicate a TV a screen. The video referee will review the incident and the referee will make the same signal if he wishes to change his decision. An 'on-field review', as we saw when Italy were rewarded a penalty at Wembley earlier this year. With more subjective decisions, the video referee will instruct the referee to watch a replay on a pitchside screen. He will make the 'TV signal' before communicating his final decision. An example of VAR in action during this season's FA Cup Credit: BT Sport The referee must always make a decision - he cannot let play unfold and wait for VAR. He can only go back to the start of the attacking phase that provoked the incident, and must wait until the ball is in a neutral zone to stop play. Why have Fifa decided to use it? The sport's governing bodies want to improve decision making and accuracy. "I would say to the fans, players and coaches that it will have an impact, a positive impact," said Fifa president Infantino. "That is what the results of the study show. "From almost 1,000 live matches that were part of the experiment, the level of the accuracy increased from 93% to 99%. It's almost perfect." "We have looked into all the details and benefits it can bring," Infantino added. "Of course, we need to speed up the reviews and the communication to the referees that are applying it but also for the general public." What are some of the criticisms? There have been several controversies and teething problems during VAR's trial stages, and the system has many opponents. Their criticisms have included: Fans in the stadium not being aware of when a decision is being reviewed, particularly in venues with no big screen. Fifa say they are working on a system to keep supporters informed. The subjective nature of football's laws. Despite the availability of replays, there remain debates and disagreements about penalty incidents. Decisions still come down to human interpretation. Chaos on the pitch, delays to matches and even more angry fans - yet the Premier League would be better off with VAR The time it takes for decisions to be reached disrupts the flow of the match. Some games with VAR in use have produced five or six minutes of first-half stoppage time. The spontaneous joy of goal celebrations being lost due to the possibility of a review, detrimental to the atmosphere in stadiums. World Cup referees lacking experience of the technology. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Sarri, a former banker, has been linked with the post even before the 59-year-old stepped down from the Napoli hotseat after guiding them to runners-up spot behind Juventus for the second time in three campaigns.
Premier League: Antonio Conte to be sacked as Chelsea manager; Maurizio Sarri will be likely replacement, say reports
Sarri, a former banker, has been linked with the post even before the 59-year-old stepped down from the Napoli hotseat after guiding them to runners-up spot behind Juventus for the second time in three campaigns.
Arsenal could welcome another defensive signing in the form of Caglar Soyuncu, who has revealed he is keen on a move to the Premier League.
Soyuncu keen on Arsenal switch
Arsenal could welcome another defensive signing in the form of Caglar Soyuncu, who has revealed he is keen on a move to the Premier League.
 1:10PM 10 min Denmark 1 Australia 0 Not sure there's been a better goal this tournament. The technique required to get that right and not slice the ball over...very few players in the wolrd besides Eriksen could have managed it. Denmark looking well placed to reach the last 16. 1:06PM GOOOOOOOOOAL! Denmark 1 Australia 0 (Eriksen 7') Sensational goal puts Denmark in front! Jorgensen flicks a pass into the path of Eriksen, who smashes a half-volley left-footed into the top corner. What a hit that was from the Tottenham man. 1:06PM 6 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Swift Australia breakaway led by Leckie ends with Rogic getting a shot away from the edge of the box that's deflected wide for a corner. Mooy swings the corner in beautifully to Leckie, who meets it powerfully but sends his header over the bar. Should have got that on target. 1:04PM 4 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Australia are stroking the ball around in their own half. Each pass is met with an 'ole' by their very vocal supporters. 1:02PM 3 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Australia forward Kruse gives away a free-kick straight away wide on the right. Eriksen whips it in dangerously for Denmark but Milligan heads clear. From the resulting corner Delaney (not the former Aston Villa defender) skews a header a few feet wide. 1:00PM Kick-off We're under way in Samara. All eyes on Christian Eriksen, and whether Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy can keep him at bay. A reminder of the teams for this one: Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. 12:53PM The players are out And lining up for the national anthems. 12:46PM VAR We've heard a lot about VAR over the last few days, but this is very nice from Al Tyers: The unintended consequences of VAR. Credit: Getty Images 12:28PM Permutations Denmark, who won their opener, will all but qualify with a win today. Australia, will pretty much be eliminated if they lose and a draw does them little good either. Now or never for the Socceroos (who apparently don't really like being called that). 12:13PM Here are the teams together - in tweet form The teams for #DENAUS are in! �� Score prediction?— FIFA World Cup �� (@FIFAWorldCup) June 21, 2018 12:08PM As is the Denmark team Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. Just the one change for Denmark, as Lasse Schone comes in for the injured William Kvist in midfield. 12:03PM The Australia team is in Bert van Marwijk has named an unchanged team. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. Tim Cahill is on the bench. Excited for today's game against Denmark. Our fans are here in force and we really appreciate the support from back in Australia as well. Big games are the best games to be a part of so let's embrace today and make it count. Always #FEARLESSpic.twitter.com/6z63qYTEbQ— TIM CAHILL (@Tim_Cahill) June 21, 2018 11:41AM Predict the score This is really cool. Tell us what you think will be the key factors in today's game and our clever machine will tell you what the score will be. Personally, I'm expecting a 2-0 Denmark win. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game 11:30AM Will Aussies rule? The 2018 World Cup continues on Thursday with Denmark, who fortuitously scraped past Peru 1-0 in their opening World Cup match on Saturday, against Group C rivals Australia, who were unlucky to lose 2-1 to France a few hours earlier. For Australia, today will pose a different challenge from the weekend. Against France they were dogged in defence - expertly marshalled by Mark Milligan and Trent Sainsbury - and had Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy snapping away at French heels in front of them. The tactic was to contain and frustrate France, and hope to land a sucker punch from set pieces. It very nearly worked. This afternoon though will require a more proactive approach because Australia will be staring at elimination if they fail to win. Denmark on the other hand can afford to be more reactive - as they were against Peru - and rely on the creativity of Christian Eriksen to unlock the Australian defence on the counter. With Kasper Schmeichel on a run of five consecutive clean sheets for Denmark, they may well only need a single goal to claim the win that would all but send them to the last 16. Australia prepare for today's game in traditional style Credit: AFP Ahead of the match, Australia manager Bert van Marwijk suggested Denmark would have no qualms about playing direct. "They are physical," Van Marwijk told reporters on Wednesday. "The French they are more creative and have a lot of speed. The Danish can also play football and want to play football but when they don't see a solution they kick the ball as far as possible." Denmark manager Age Hareide meanwhile acknowledged yesterday that Australia's game-plan will revolve around stopping Eriksen. "Christian is a player who can change matches and we try to get him involved as much as we can," Hareide said. "The opponents, they are going to be very cautious and careful about him, but he is used to that, isn’t he, from the Premier League. We hope that we will get him up to a good level and that he will be able to show good things at this World Cup." We'll be getting the team news at 12pm, if not before, and will very generously share it with you as soon as we have it.
Denmark vs Australia, World Cup 2018: live score and latest updates
1:10PM 10 min Denmark 1 Australia 0 Not sure there's been a better goal this tournament. The technique required to get that right and not slice the ball over...very few players in the wolrd besides Eriksen could have managed it. Denmark looking well placed to reach the last 16. 1:06PM GOOOOOOOOOAL! Denmark 1 Australia 0 (Eriksen 7') Sensational goal puts Denmark in front! Jorgensen flicks a pass into the path of Eriksen, who smashes a half-volley left-footed into the top corner. What a hit that was from the Tottenham man. 1:06PM 6 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Swift Australia breakaway led by Leckie ends with Rogic getting a shot away from the edge of the box that's deflected wide for a corner. Mooy swings the corner in beautifully to Leckie, who meets it powerfully but sends his header over the bar. Should have got that on target. 1:04PM 4 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Australia are stroking the ball around in their own half. Each pass is met with an 'ole' by their very vocal supporters. 1:02PM 3 min Denmark 0 Australia 0 Australia forward Kruse gives away a free-kick straight away wide on the right. Eriksen whips it in dangerously for Denmark but Milligan heads clear. From the resulting corner Delaney (not the former Aston Villa defender) skews a header a few feet wide. 1:00PM Kick-off We're under way in Samara. All eyes on Christian Eriksen, and whether Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy can keep him at bay. A reminder of the teams for this one: Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. 12:53PM The players are out And lining up for the national anthems. 12:46PM VAR We've heard a lot about VAR over the last few days, but this is very nice from Al Tyers: The unintended consequences of VAR. Credit: Getty Images 12:28PM Permutations Denmark, who won their opener, will all but qualify with a win today. Australia, will pretty much be eliminated if they lose and a draw does them little good either. Now or never for the Socceroos (who apparently don't really like being called that). 12:13PM Here are the teams together - in tweet form The teams for #DENAUS are in! �� Score prediction?— FIFA World Cup �� (@FIFAWorldCup) June 21, 2018 12:08PM As is the Denmark team Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. Just the one change for Denmark, as Lasse Schone comes in for the injured William Kvist in midfield. 12:03PM The Australia team is in Bert van Marwijk has named an unchanged team. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. Tim Cahill is on the bench. Excited for today's game against Denmark. Our fans are here in force and we really appreciate the support from back in Australia as well. Big games are the best games to be a part of so let's embrace today and make it count. Always #FEARLESSpic.twitter.com/6z63qYTEbQ— TIM CAHILL (@Tim_Cahill) June 21, 2018 11:41AM Predict the score This is really cool. Tell us what you think will be the key factors in today's game and our clever machine will tell you what the score will be. Personally, I'm expecting a 2-0 Denmark win. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game 11:30AM Will Aussies rule? The 2018 World Cup continues on Thursday with Denmark, who fortuitously scraped past Peru 1-0 in their opening World Cup match on Saturday, against Group C rivals Australia, who were unlucky to lose 2-1 to France a few hours earlier. For Australia, today will pose a different challenge from the weekend. Against France they were dogged in defence - expertly marshalled by Mark Milligan and Trent Sainsbury - and had Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy snapping away at French heels in front of them. The tactic was to contain and frustrate France, and hope to land a sucker punch from set pieces. It very nearly worked. This afternoon though will require a more proactive approach because Australia will be staring at elimination if they fail to win. Denmark on the other hand can afford to be more reactive - as they were against Peru - and rely on the creativity of Christian Eriksen to unlock the Australian defence on the counter. With Kasper Schmeichel on a run of five consecutive clean sheets for Denmark, they may well only need a single goal to claim the win that would all but send them to the last 16. Australia prepare for today's game in traditional style Credit: AFP Ahead of the match, Australia manager Bert van Marwijk suggested Denmark would have no qualms about playing direct. "They are physical," Van Marwijk told reporters on Wednesday. "The French they are more creative and have a lot of speed. The Danish can also play football and want to play football but when they don't see a solution they kick the ball as far as possible." Denmark manager Age Hareide meanwhile acknowledged yesterday that Australia's game-plan will revolve around stopping Eriksen. "Christian is a player who can change matches and we try to get him involved as much as we can," Hareide said. "The opponents, they are going to be very cautious and careful about him, but he is used to that, isn’t he, from the Premier League. We hope that we will get him up to a good level and that he will be able to show good things at this World Cup." We'll be getting the team news at 12pm, if not before, and will very generously share it with you as soon as we have it.
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
Too many average foreign players prevent England's tournament winning youngsters playing for top clubs
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
Too many average foreign players prevent England's tournament winning youngsters playing for top clubs
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
Too many average foreign players prevent England's tournament winning youngsters playing for top clubs
Rob Lee says there are too many average foreign players in the Premier League taking up spots for young English players.
The Premier League side's board member says made it clear that talks were advanced, but says that the negotiations have not been simple
Still some things to sort in Jorginho to Man City deal - Alberto Galassi
The Premier League side's board member says made it clear that talks were advanced, but says that the negotiations have not been simple
The Premier League playmakers get set to meet in Samara and their delivery from set-pieces could prove to be decisive
Aaron Mooy vs Christian Eriksen: The battle to decide Australia's World Cup clash with Denmark
The Premier League playmakers get set to meet in Samara and their delivery from set-pieces could prove to be decisive
The Premier League playmakers get set to meet in Samara and their delivery from set-pieces could prove to be decisive
Aaron Mooy vs Christian Eriksen: The battle to decide Australia's World Cup clash with Denmark
The Premier League playmakers get set to meet in Samara and their delivery from set-pieces could prove to be decisive
A profile of Swansea's Jordan Ayew with the forward gathering interest from the Premier League
Video: Jordan Ayew - player profile
A profile of Swansea's Jordan Ayew with the forward gathering interest from the Premier League
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Man Utd learn Boateng price
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Denmark vs Australia, World Cup 2018 Group C, kicks off at 1pm on ITV 1 You are the VAR: Think you can do better than the World Cup referees? Test yourself here Get Telegraph Football WhatsApp for in-match analysis and talking points throughout the World Cup Betting guide: predictions and tips for Denmark v Australia > WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article 12:08PM As is the Denmark team Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. 12:03PM The Australia team is in Bert van Marwijk has named an unchanged team. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. Tim Cahill is on the bench. Excited for today's game against Denmark. Our fans are here in force and we really appreciate the support from back in Australia as well. Big games are the best games to be a part of so let's embrace today and make it count. Always #FEARLESSpic.twitter.com/6z63qYTEbQ— TIM CAHILL (@Tim_Cahill) June 21, 2018 11:41AM Predict the score This is really cool. Tell us what you think will be the key factors in today's game and our clever machine will tell you what the score will be. Personally, I'm expecting a 2-0 Denmark win. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game 11:30AM Will Aussies rule? The 2018 World Cup continues on Thursday with Denmark, who fortuitously scraped past Peru 1-0 in their opening World Cup match on Saturday, against Group C rivals Australia, who were unlucky to lose 2-1 to France a few hours earlier. For Australia, today will pose a different challenge from the weekend. Against France they were dogged in defence - expertly marshalled by Mark Milligan and Trent Sainsbury - and had Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy snapping away at French heels in front of them. The tactic was to contain and frustrate France, and hope to land a sucker punch from set pieces. It very nearly worked. This afternoon though will require a more proactive approach because Australia will be staring at elimination if they fail to win. Denmark on the other hand can afford to be more reactive - as they were against Peru - and rely on the creativity of Christian Eriksen to unlock the Australian defence on the counter. With Kasper Schmeichel on a run of five consecutive clean sheets for Denmark, they may well only need a single goal to claim the win that would all but send them to the last 16. Australia prepare for today's game in traditional style Credit: AFP Ahead of the match, Australia manager Bert van Marwijk suggested Denmark would have no qualms about playing direct. "They are physical," Van Marwijk told reporters on Wednesday. "The French they are more creative and have a lot of speed. The Danish can also play football and want to play football but when they don't see a solution they kick the ball as far as possible." Denmark manager Age Hareide meanwhile acknowledged yesterday that Australia's game-plan will revolve around stopping Eriksen. "Christian is a player who can change matches and we try to get him involved as much as we can," Hareide said. "The opponents, they are going to be very cautious and careful about him, but he is used to that, isn’t he, from the Premier League. We hope that we will get him up to a good level and that he will be able to show good things at this World Cup." We'll be getting the team news at 12pm, if not before, and will very generously share it with you as soon as we have it.
Denmark vs Australia, World Cup 2018: live score and latest updates
Denmark vs Australia, World Cup 2018 Group C, kicks off at 1pm on ITV 1 You are the VAR: Think you can do better than the World Cup referees? Test yourself here Get Telegraph Football WhatsApp for in-match analysis and talking points throughout the World Cup Betting guide: predictions and tips for Denmark v Australia > WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article 12:08PM As is the Denmark team Denmark (4-2-3-1): Schmeichel; Dalsgaard, Kjaer, Christensen, Stryger; Delaney, Schöne; Poulsen, Eriksen, Sisto; Jorgensen. 12:03PM The Australia team is in Bert van Marwijk has named an unchanged team. Australia (4-2-3-1): Ryan; Milligan, Behich, Risdon, Sainsbury; Mooy, Jedinak; Rogic, Leckie, Kruse; Nabbout. Tim Cahill is on the bench. Excited for today's game against Denmark. Our fans are here in force and we really appreciate the support from back in Australia as well. Big games are the best games to be a part of so let's embrace today and make it count. Always #FEARLESSpic.twitter.com/6z63qYTEbQ— TIM CAHILL (@Tim_Cahill) June 21, 2018 11:41AM Predict the score This is really cool. Tell us what you think will be the key factors in today's game and our clever machine will tell you what the score will be. Personally, I'm expecting a 2-0 Denmark win. World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game 11:30AM Will Aussies rule? The 2018 World Cup continues on Thursday with Denmark, who fortuitously scraped past Peru 1-0 in their opening World Cup match on Saturday, against Group C rivals Australia, who were unlucky to lose 2-1 to France a few hours earlier. For Australia, today will pose a different challenge from the weekend. Against France they were dogged in defence - expertly marshalled by Mark Milligan and Trent Sainsbury - and had Mile Jedinak and Aaron Mooy snapping away at French heels in front of them. The tactic was to contain and frustrate France, and hope to land a sucker punch from set pieces. It very nearly worked. This afternoon though will require a more proactive approach because Australia will be staring at elimination if they fail to win. Denmark on the other hand can afford to be more reactive - as they were against Peru - and rely on the creativity of Christian Eriksen to unlock the Australian defence on the counter. With Kasper Schmeichel on a run of five consecutive clean sheets for Denmark, they may well only need a single goal to claim the win that would all but send them to the last 16. Australia prepare for today's game in traditional style Credit: AFP Ahead of the match, Australia manager Bert van Marwijk suggested Denmark would have no qualms about playing direct. "They are physical," Van Marwijk told reporters on Wednesday. "The French they are more creative and have a lot of speed. The Danish can also play football and want to play football but when they don't see a solution they kick the ball as far as possible." Denmark manager Age Hareide meanwhile acknowledged yesterday that Australia's game-plan will revolve around stopping Eriksen. "Christian is a player who can change matches and we try to get him involved as much as we can," Hareide said. "The opponents, they are going to be very cautious and careful about him, but he is used to that, isn’t he, from the Premier League. We hope that we will get him up to a good level and that he will be able to show good things at this World Cup." We'll be getting the team news at 12pm, if not before, and will very generously share it with you as soon as we have it.
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification (AFP Photo/Glyn KIRK )
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification
Antonio Conte's parting gift of an FA Cup could not compensate for a fifth-placed Premier League finish which meant no Champions League qualification (AFP Photo/Glyn KIRK )
Frank Lampard's first competitive game as Derby manager will kick-off the Championship campaign. Former England midfielder Lampard, who took over as boss of the Rams three weeks ago, takes his team to Reading on Friday, August 3. Derby also figured in the opening game of the 2017-18 campaign, drawing 1-1 at Sunderland. They went on to finish sixth but lost out to promoted Fulham in the play-offs, with Gary Rowett since leaving to join Stoke following their relegation from the Premier League. The opening round of Championship matches, revealed by the EFL on Thursday morning, will be spread over four days. There is an intriguing contest at Elland Road on Sunday, August 5, with Leeds hosting Stoke in what will represent the first competitive match with their new clubs for respective managers Marcelo Bielsa and Rowett. Marcelo Bielsa is the new Leeds coach Credit: afp Steve Bruce takes his Aston Villa side - beaten play-off finalists last month - to former club Hull on Monday, August 6, with the remaining nine Championship games taking place on the Saturday. Relegated West Brom, who confirmed Darren Moore as their permanent boss following an impressive stint as caretaker, open at home to Bolton while Graham Potter's Swansea - the other team bidding for an instant top flight return - have an evening game at Sheffield United. Of the promoted trio, League One champions Wigan start at home to Sheffield Wednesday, runners-up Blackburn are at Ipswich and play-off winners Rotherham go to Brentford. Elsewhere, Birmingham host Norwich, Middlesbrough are at Millwall, Bristol City face Nottingham Forest at Ashton Gate and Preston welcome QPR. There is deja vu among the final round of fixtures. Bolton ensured survival last month with a final-day home win over Nottingham Forest and the two teams meet again in their final game of next season, albeit at Forest. Lampard's Rams host West Brom in the most eye-catching May 5 fixture. Stoke finish at home to Sheffield United and Swansea are at Blackburn. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article In League One, Joey Barton starts his management career at Fleetwood with a home match against AFC Wimbledon. Sunderland, playing in the third tier of English football for only the second time after finishing bottom of last season's Championship, open with a home match against Charlton at 1230 on August 4. There are home games too for the other relegated sides, with Barnsley hosting Oxford and Burton taking on Rochdale. League Two champions Accrington open at home to Gillingham, Wycombe face Blackpool and play-off winners Coventry tackle Scunthorpe, with the other team to move up - Luton - away to Portsmouth. Beaten play-off finalists Shrewsbury - now under the leadership of John Askey - start at home to Bradford, Peterborough face Bristol Rovers, Southend host Doncaster and Plymouth go to Walsall. Macclesfield and Tranmere, back in the EFL after promotion last season, both start their League Two campaigns away from home. test - do not delete National League champions Macclesfield, with Mark Yates now at the helm following Askey's departure, open at Swindon. Tranmere - Wembley conquerors of Boreham Wood - begin at Stevenage. Bury, Northampton and Oldham all start with home games as they bid for an instant return to League One, with Yeovil, Lincoln and MK Dons - the other relegated team - the respective opponents. Carlisle have a near 700-mile round trip to beaten play-off finalists Exeter on the opening day, Notts County host Colchester and Mansfield are at home to Newport. Grimsby begin at home to Forest Green, Cheltenham host Crawley, Cambridge travel to Port Vale and Morecambe are at Crewe.
Football League fixtures 2018/19: Frank Lampard starts Championship campaign as Derby manager against Reading
Frank Lampard's first competitive game as Derby manager will kick-off the Championship campaign. Former England midfielder Lampard, who took over as boss of the Rams three weeks ago, takes his team to Reading on Friday, August 3. Derby also figured in the opening game of the 2017-18 campaign, drawing 1-1 at Sunderland. They went on to finish sixth but lost out to promoted Fulham in the play-offs, with Gary Rowett since leaving to join Stoke following their relegation from the Premier League. The opening round of Championship matches, revealed by the EFL on Thursday morning, will be spread over four days. There is an intriguing contest at Elland Road on Sunday, August 5, with Leeds hosting Stoke in what will represent the first competitive match with their new clubs for respective managers Marcelo Bielsa and Rowett. Marcelo Bielsa is the new Leeds coach Credit: afp Steve Bruce takes his Aston Villa side - beaten play-off finalists last month - to former club Hull on Monday, August 6, with the remaining nine Championship games taking place on the Saturday. Relegated West Brom, who confirmed Darren Moore as their permanent boss following an impressive stint as caretaker, open at home to Bolton while Graham Potter's Swansea - the other team bidding for an instant top flight return - have an evening game at Sheffield United. Of the promoted trio, League One champions Wigan start at home to Sheffield Wednesday, runners-up Blackburn are at Ipswich and play-off winners Rotherham go to Brentford. Elsewhere, Birmingham host Norwich, Middlesbrough are at Millwall, Bristol City face Nottingham Forest at Ashton Gate and Preston welcome QPR. There is deja vu among the final round of fixtures. Bolton ensured survival last month with a final-day home win over Nottingham Forest and the two teams meet again in their final game of next season, albeit at Forest. Lampard's Rams host West Brom in the most eye-catching May 5 fixture. Stoke finish at home to Sheffield United and Swansea are at Blackburn. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article In League One, Joey Barton starts his management career at Fleetwood with a home match against AFC Wimbledon. Sunderland, playing in the third tier of English football for only the second time after finishing bottom of last season's Championship, open with a home match against Charlton at 1230 on August 4. There are home games too for the other relegated sides, with Barnsley hosting Oxford and Burton taking on Rochdale. League Two champions Accrington open at home to Gillingham, Wycombe face Blackpool and play-off winners Coventry tackle Scunthorpe, with the other team to move up - Luton - away to Portsmouth. Beaten play-off finalists Shrewsbury - now under the leadership of John Askey - start at home to Bradford, Peterborough face Bristol Rovers, Southend host Doncaster and Plymouth go to Walsall. Macclesfield and Tranmere, back in the EFL after promotion last season, both start their League Two campaigns away from home. test - do not delete National League champions Macclesfield, with Mark Yates now at the helm following Askey's departure, open at Swindon. Tranmere - Wembley conquerors of Boreham Wood - begin at Stevenage. Bury, Northampton and Oldham all start with home games as they bid for an instant return to League One, with Yeovil, Lincoln and MK Dons - the other relegated team - the respective opponents. Carlisle have a near 700-mile round trip to beaten play-off finalists Exeter on the opening day, Notts County host Colchester and Mansfield are at home to Newport. Grimsby begin at home to Forest Green, Cheltenham host Crawley, Cambridge travel to Port Vale and Morecambe are at Crewe.
Frank Lampard's first competitive game as Derby manager will kick-off the Championship campaign. Former England midfielder Lampard, who took over as boss of the Rams three weeks ago, takes his team to Reading on Friday, August 3. Derby also figured in the opening game of the 2017-18 campaign, drawing 1-1 at Sunderland. They went on to finish sixth but lost out to promoted Fulham in the play-offs, with Gary Rowett since leaving to join Stoke following their relegation from the Premier League. The opening round of Championship matches, revealed by the EFL on Thursday morning, will be spread over four days. There is an intriguing contest at Elland Road on Sunday, August 5, with Leeds hosting Stoke in what will represent the first competitive match with their new clubs for respective managers Marcelo Bielsa and Rowett. Marcelo Bielsa is the new Leeds coach Credit: afp Steve Bruce takes his Aston Villa side - beaten play-off finalists last month - to former club Hull on Monday, August 6, with the remaining nine Championship games taking place on the Saturday. Relegated West Brom, who confirmed Darren Moore as their permanent boss following an impressive stint as caretaker, open at home to Bolton while Graham Potter's Swansea - the other team bidding for an instant top flight return - have an evening game at Sheffield United. Of the promoted trio, League One champions Wigan start at home to Sheffield Wednesday, runners-up Blackburn are at Ipswich and play-off winners Rotherham go to Brentford. Elsewhere, Birmingham host Norwich, Middlesbrough are at Millwall, Bristol City face Nottingham Forest at Ashton Gate and Preston welcome QPR. There is deja vu among the final round of fixtures. Bolton ensured survival last month with a final-day home win over Nottingham Forest and the two teams meet again in their final game of next season, albeit at Forest. Lampard's Rams host West Brom in the most eye-catching May 5 fixture. Stoke finish at home to Sheffield United and Swansea are at Blackburn. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article In League One, Joey Barton starts his management career at Fleetwood with a home match against AFC Wimbledon. Sunderland, playing in the third tier of English football for only the second time after finishing bottom of last season's Championship, open with a home match against Charlton at 1230 on August 4. There are home games too for the other relegated sides, with Barnsley hosting Oxford and Burton taking on Rochdale. League Two champions Accrington open at home to Gillingham, Wycombe face Blackpool and play-off winners Coventry tackle Scunthorpe, with the other team to move up - Luton - away to Portsmouth. Beaten play-off finalists Shrewsbury - now under the leadership of John Askey - start at home to Bradford, Peterborough face Bristol Rovers, Southend host Doncaster and Plymouth go to Walsall. Macclesfield and Tranmere, back in the EFL after promotion last season, both start their League Two campaigns away from home. test - do not delete National League champions Macclesfield, with Mark Yates now at the helm following Askey's departure, open at Swindon. Tranmere - Wembley conquerors of Boreham Wood - begin at Stevenage. Bury, Northampton and Oldham all start with home games as they bid for an instant return to League One, with Yeovil, Lincoln and MK Dons - the other relegated team - the respective opponents. Carlisle have a near 700-mile round trip to beaten play-off finalists Exeter on the opening day, Notts County host Colchester and Mansfield are at home to Newport. Grimsby begin at home to Forest Green, Cheltenham host Crawley, Cambridge travel to Port Vale and Morecambe are at Crewe.
Football League fixtures 2018/19: Frank Lampard starts Championship campaign as Derby manager against Reading
Frank Lampard's first competitive game as Derby manager will kick-off the Championship campaign. Former England midfielder Lampard, who took over as boss of the Rams three weeks ago, takes his team to Reading on Friday, August 3. Derby also figured in the opening game of the 2017-18 campaign, drawing 1-1 at Sunderland. They went on to finish sixth but lost out to promoted Fulham in the play-offs, with Gary Rowett since leaving to join Stoke following their relegation from the Premier League. The opening round of Championship matches, revealed by the EFL on Thursday morning, will be spread over four days. There is an intriguing contest at Elland Road on Sunday, August 5, with Leeds hosting Stoke in what will represent the first competitive match with their new clubs for respective managers Marcelo Bielsa and Rowett. Marcelo Bielsa is the new Leeds coach Credit: afp Steve Bruce takes his Aston Villa side - beaten play-off finalists last month - to former club Hull on Monday, August 6, with the remaining nine Championship games taking place on the Saturday. Relegated West Brom, who confirmed Darren Moore as their permanent boss following an impressive stint as caretaker, open at home to Bolton while Graham Potter's Swansea - the other team bidding for an instant top flight return - have an evening game at Sheffield United. Of the promoted trio, League One champions Wigan start at home to Sheffield Wednesday, runners-up Blackburn are at Ipswich and play-off winners Rotherham go to Brentford. Elsewhere, Birmingham host Norwich, Middlesbrough are at Millwall, Bristol City face Nottingham Forest at Ashton Gate and Preston welcome QPR. There is deja vu among the final round of fixtures. Bolton ensured survival last month with a final-day home win over Nottingham Forest and the two teams meet again in their final game of next season, albeit at Forest. Lampard's Rams host West Brom in the most eye-catching May 5 fixture. Stoke finish at home to Sheffield United and Swansea are at Blackburn. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article In League One, Joey Barton starts his management career at Fleetwood with a home match against AFC Wimbledon. Sunderland, playing in the third tier of English football for only the second time after finishing bottom of last season's Championship, open with a home match against Charlton at 1230 on August 4. There are home games too for the other relegated sides, with Barnsley hosting Oxford and Burton taking on Rochdale. League Two champions Accrington open at home to Gillingham, Wycombe face Blackpool and play-off winners Coventry tackle Scunthorpe, with the other team to move up - Luton - away to Portsmouth. Beaten play-off finalists Shrewsbury - now under the leadership of John Askey - start at home to Bradford, Peterborough face Bristol Rovers, Southend host Doncaster and Plymouth go to Walsall. Macclesfield and Tranmere, back in the EFL after promotion last season, both start their League Two campaigns away from home. test - do not delete National League champions Macclesfield, with Mark Yates now at the helm following Askey's departure, open at Swindon. Tranmere - Wembley conquerors of Boreham Wood - begin at Stevenage. Bury, Northampton and Oldham all start with home games as they bid for an instant return to League One, with Yeovil, Lincoln and MK Dons - the other relegated team - the respective opponents. Carlisle have a near 700-mile round trip to beaten play-off finalists Exeter on the opening day, Notts County host Colchester and Mansfield are at home to Newport. Grimsby begin at home to Forest Green, Cheltenham host Crawley, Cambridge travel to Port Vale and Morecambe are at Crewe.
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
VAR: the unintended consequences
More penalties According to a Betfair source, the average pre-game price on a penalty taken in the Premier League last season was 4.05 and it's around 3.0 for World Cup matches at the moment." So bookmakers normally offer odds of around 3/1 that there will be a penalty, and now it 2/1 about a spot-kick in the 90 minutes. That’s, obviously, because we are seeing more penalties, and that is due to VAR. Egypt's Mohamed Salah (bottom) goes down in the box, resulting in a penalty v Russia Credit: PA Better takers If the chances of getting a penalty increase, then it makes sense to get better at taking them. There really should be no excuse for a professional failing to kick the ball into the net from 12 yards. If you strike the penalty well, it should take about 0.4 seconds to reach the goal. An average professional goalie takes 0.6 seconds to dive across the goal. If you put it in the corner, hard, that’s the end of the matter. England's goalkeeper Jordan Pickford fails to stop a penalty kick during the Russia 2018 World Cup Group G football match v Tunisia Credit: AFP Specialist takers? Even the very best, however, don’t manage that all the time. Lionel Messi has a career success rate of 81%: 71 out of 88. Cristiano Ronaldo, who is about as good as it gets, is up at 84%: scoring 93 out of 111 efforts in his career. If a team was getting a penalty every three matches (as implied by the 2/1 odds) then that might be 13 opportunities across a League season. A team that could score 12 out of 13, say, could give itself a significant advantage. Might we start seeing penalty ability being a factor in selection? Or even a special teams penalty taker who could be on the bench if a team got a spot-kick late in the game? Cristiano Ronaldo scores a penalty past Spain's goalkeeper David De Gea Credit: AFP Set pieces We are seeing a lot of good freekicks and corners this World Cup, and a lot of goals from them. This is because VAR makes it harder for defenders to get away with manhandling attackers (although, in fairness, this was not the case for Harry Kane against Tunisia). VAR didn't do Harry Kane much good vs Tunisia Credit: BBC Most teams might not be able to pass the ball like Iniesta and Isco, but it should not be beyond a well motivated team to get a guy who can deliver the ball in and some decent movement in the box from a few big lads. VAR could usher in an era of set piece specialism… which in turn could be a leveller between the best teams and the hard-working average teams. Fewer sendings off The World Cup has thus far seen only one red card, and that was just a moment of madness (when Colombia midfielder Carlos Sanchez thought he was the goalie) rather than a team forced into fouling by being over-stretched, say. Carlos Sanchez, seated, got a red card so stupid that no amount of technology in this world or any other could change the decision Credit: AP Are players being more cautious? Probably a bit early to say, but the knowledge that you are less likely to get away with red-card potential fouls might change decision-making in the tackle. test - do not delete Referees being more cautious If you know that there is a chance of taking your time and checking the facts, why wouldn’t you? Why risk having to make a decision with less than perfect information? Better safe than sorry: Referee Andres Cunha reviews the VAR footage, before awarding France a penalty during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group C match between France and Australia Credit: Getty As VAR becomes more entrenched referees will use it more. Some cowboy or other will back his judgement in a massive match and be pilloried for not using the tools available. In cricket, now that they can check with cameras whether a catch has carried (or bounced) they use the facility as often as they can, to a ridiculous degree. How VAR could have changed past World Cups Celebrations spoiled? Some people think that it is vitally important to get the correct decision. Others think that the joy of the moment is spoiled by VAR checking. 61m: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO... ... oh wait. Not a goal yet. A darkness falls over the stadium. It’s the spectre of #VAR arriving like Dracula. It proceeds to suck the fun out of the game, then leaves. Disallowed.#IRN 0-1 #ESP#IRNESP#WorldCup— Reykjavík Grapevine (@rvkgrapevine) June 20, 2018 Either way, a goal is no longer just a goal… it’s a possible or probable goal. Either you like that or you don’t, but whatever else VAR does, it seems likely to change how we watch the game. WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Soccer Football - Premier League - Crystal Palace vs Tottenham Hotspur - Selhurst Park, London, Britain - February 25, 2018 Crystal Palace's Christian Benteke before the match Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/Files
Premier League - Crystal Palace vs Tottenham Hotspur
Soccer Football - Premier League - Crystal Palace vs Tottenham Hotspur - Selhurst Park, London, Britain - February 25, 2018 Crystal Palace's Christian Benteke before the match Action Images via Reuters/Paul Childs/Files
Soccer Football - Premier League - Liverpool vs West Ham United - Anfield, Liverpool, Britain - February 24, 2018 Liverpool's Emre Can celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images via Reuters/Carl Recine
Premier League - Liverpool vs West Ham United
Soccer Football - Premier League - Liverpool vs West Ham United - Anfield, Liverpool, Britain - February 24, 2018 Liverpool's Emre Can celebrates scoring their first goal Action Images via Reuters/Carl Recine
Manchester City hat sich offenbar die Dienste von Jorginho vom SSC Neapel gesichert. Der Mittelfeldspieler aus der Serie A soll einem Bericht des Telegraph zufolge eine Ablöse von rund 50 Millionen Euro kosten.
Premier League: Citizens verpflichten offenbar Neapel-Star
Manchester City hat sich offenbar die Dienste von Jorginho vom SSC Neapel gesichert. Der Mittelfeldspieler aus der Serie A soll einem Bericht des Telegraph zufolge eine Ablöse von rund 50 Millionen Euro kosten.
​Dopo l’arrivo di Fabian Ruiz, sbarcato in Campania nella giornata di ieri e pronto per questa nuova avventura alla corte di Carlo Ancelotti, il ​Napoli è vicino a chiudere un altro affare, questa volta in uscita. Il regista del sodalizio campano Jorginho, infatti, è ormai ad un passo dall'approdo in Premier League, al Manchester City per una cifra vicina ai 49 milioni di euro. La trattativa andava avanti da diverso tempo solo che sembrava essersi bloccata poiché gli inglesi non erano disposti...
Napoli, è fatta per la cessione di Jorginho al City: le cifre dell'operazione
​Dopo l’arrivo di Fabian Ruiz, sbarcato in Campania nella giornata di ieri e pronto per questa nuova avventura alla corte di Carlo Ancelotti, il ​Napoli è vicino a chiudere un altro affare, questa volta in uscita. Il regista del sodalizio campano Jorginho, infatti, è ormai ad un passo dall'approdo in Premier League, al Manchester City per una cifra vicina ai 49 milioni di euro. La trattativa andava avanti da diverso tempo solo che sembrava essersi bloccata poiché gli inglesi non erano disposti...
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
The 32: Ronaldo's World Cup future, the VAR debate rages on - plus Southgate's young Three Lions
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.
The 32: Ronaldo's World Cup future, the VAR debate rages on - plus Southgate's young Three Lions
Premier League legend Rob Lee says Cristiano Ronaldo will probably play until he's 40 because he has managed to avoid major injuries during his career.

Qué leer a continuación