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Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Man City line up £100m Hazard bid
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
Nemanja Matic has warned Manchester United need quality signings this summer if they are to challenge for the Premier League and Champions League as the midfielder admitted the club’s trophyless campaign has cranked up the pressure for next season. Mourinho ideally wants to bring in five new players this summer but knows the truncated transfer window, which is compounded by the month long World Cup finals in Russia, will reduce the time to complete deals and make acquiring such numbers increasingly difficult. They include two full backs, a centre-half, a midfielder and a winger. The United manager will also be under pressure to offload peripheral players, such as Matteo Darmian and Daley Blind, to accommodate space on the wage bill and avoid a bloated squad. If Marouane Fellaini fails to agree a new contract, Mourinho would be left needing two midfielders following the retirement of Michael Carrick, a scenario which could impact on plans to strengthen elsewhere. Defeat to Chelsea in the FA Cup final at Wembley ensured United finished without a trophy and the prospect of Liverpool winning the Champions League against Real Madrid on Saturday would be another kick in the teeth to Mourinho after a campaign in which he has seen the club’s other biggest rival, Manchester City, run away with the title. Pep Guardiola’s side amassed a century of points and finished 19 ahead of United, in second. “I think we need some players with some experience to bring some more qualities to our team,” Matic said. “After that, we can fight for the title and the Champions League also.” FA Cup final player ratings Asked if the Chelsea defeat had increased the pressure for next season, the United midfielder added: “Of course, this is football. When you don’t win one year, the next year is always more pressure. When you play for Manchester United, this is a normal thing and we have to accept that and deal with that.” United are working on a deal for Fred, Shakhtar Donetsk’s Brazil midfielder, whom City tried to sign in January. City are thought to have now turned their sights to Jorginho, the Napoli and Italy midfielder, which could assist United’s pursuit of Fred although Shakhtar want £52.5 million. United have also been linked with left-backs Alex Sandro, of Juventus, and Tottenham’s Danny Rose, as well as Spurs defender Toby Alderweireld, Chelsea winger Willian and Real Madrid centre-half Raphael Varane. Nice midfielder Jean Michael Seri has been offered to all the Premier League’s top six. However, Mourinho’s chequered record in the transfer market since taking over at Old Trafford does not inspire confidence and the manager must address a series of issues within his existing squad. Victor Lindelof has endured an unconvincing debut season since his £30.7 million move from Benfica last summer and was omitted from the FA Cup final squad altogether. United in turmoil puff Another centre-half, Eric Bailly, a £30.4 million recruit from Villarreal in 2016, has been strangely frozen out since returning from a long injury lay-off and has made just five starts since February, despite being widely regarded as the best defender at the club. Team-mates have been left bemused by Bailly’s persistent omissions and Mourinho’s claims that he was giving more playing time to those defenders who had a chance of going to the World Cup failed to convince some. Left back Luke Shaw has never won Mourinho’s trust and his future is shrouded in uncertainty with his career at a crossroads. Paul Pogba’s form has plummeted since the turn of the year and it cannot be discounted that Mourinho would consider cashing in on the France midfielder if Paris St-Germain made a huge offer this summer. Anthony Martial’s relationship with Mourinho is also strained and Juventus head a queue of clubs, including Spurs, who are interested in signing the France forward. Martial’s omission from the France squad for the World Cup may force him to consider his options with the player – a substitute in the Cup final – not getting regular starts. “I’d like to think he’d stay,” Paul Scholes, the former United midfielder, said. “Whether his manager quite fancies him I’m not too sure about at the minute. He’s not shown too much confidence in him. Martial’s a really good talent. I think he needs a bit of love, he needs an arm around him. Every time he comes on he impresses me. I just hope he’s not one of those that leaves and then we see the best of them.” Other changes are also expected behind the scenes with Mourinho due to hire Italian fitness coach Stefano Rapetti from Sampdoria in the wake of Rui Faria’s departure as assistant manager. Rapetti worked with Mourinho at Inter Milan. Kieran McKenna, United’s Under-18 coach, could also be promoted to the first team set up.
Nemanja Matic says Manchester United must buy quality this summer as club targets five new signings
Nemanja Matic has warned Manchester United need quality signings this summer if they are to challenge for the Premier League and Champions League as the midfielder admitted the club’s trophyless campaign has cranked up the pressure for next season. Mourinho ideally wants to bring in five new players this summer but knows the truncated transfer window, which is compounded by the month long World Cup finals in Russia, will reduce the time to complete deals and make acquiring such numbers increasingly difficult. They include two full backs, a centre-half, a midfielder and a winger. The United manager will also be under pressure to offload peripheral players, such as Matteo Darmian and Daley Blind, to accommodate space on the wage bill and avoid a bloated squad. If Marouane Fellaini fails to agree a new contract, Mourinho would be left needing two midfielders following the retirement of Michael Carrick, a scenario which could impact on plans to strengthen elsewhere. Defeat to Chelsea in the FA Cup final at Wembley ensured United finished without a trophy and the prospect of Liverpool winning the Champions League against Real Madrid on Saturday would be another kick in the teeth to Mourinho after a campaign in which he has seen the club’s other biggest rival, Manchester City, run away with the title. Pep Guardiola’s side amassed a century of points and finished 19 ahead of United, in second. “I think we need some players with some experience to bring some more qualities to our team,” Matic said. “After that, we can fight for the title and the Champions League also.” FA Cup final player ratings Asked if the Chelsea defeat had increased the pressure for next season, the United midfielder added: “Of course, this is football. When you don’t win one year, the next year is always more pressure. When you play for Manchester United, this is a normal thing and we have to accept that and deal with that.” United are working on a deal for Fred, Shakhtar Donetsk’s Brazil midfielder, whom City tried to sign in January. City are thought to have now turned their sights to Jorginho, the Napoli and Italy midfielder, which could assist United’s pursuit of Fred although Shakhtar want £52.5 million. United have also been linked with left-backs Alex Sandro, of Juventus, and Tottenham’s Danny Rose, as well as Spurs defender Toby Alderweireld, Chelsea winger Willian and Real Madrid centre-half Raphael Varane. Nice midfielder Jean Michael Seri has been offered to all the Premier League’s top six. However, Mourinho’s chequered record in the transfer market since taking over at Old Trafford does not inspire confidence and the manager must address a series of issues within his existing squad. Victor Lindelof has endured an unconvincing debut season since his £30.7 million move from Benfica last summer and was omitted from the FA Cup final squad altogether. United in turmoil puff Another centre-half, Eric Bailly, a £30.4 million recruit from Villarreal in 2016, has been strangely frozen out since returning from a long injury lay-off and has made just five starts since February, despite being widely regarded as the best defender at the club. Team-mates have been left bemused by Bailly’s persistent omissions and Mourinho’s claims that he was giving more playing time to those defenders who had a chance of going to the World Cup failed to convince some. Left back Luke Shaw has never won Mourinho’s trust and his future is shrouded in uncertainty with his career at a crossroads. Paul Pogba’s form has plummeted since the turn of the year and it cannot be discounted that Mourinho would consider cashing in on the France midfielder if Paris St-Germain made a huge offer this summer. Anthony Martial’s relationship with Mourinho is also strained and Juventus head a queue of clubs, including Spurs, who are interested in signing the France forward. Martial’s omission from the France squad for the World Cup may force him to consider his options with the player – a substitute in the Cup final – not getting regular starts. “I’d like to think he’d stay,” Paul Scholes, the former United midfielder, said. “Whether his manager quite fancies him I’m not too sure about at the minute. He’s not shown too much confidence in him. Martial’s a really good talent. I think he needs a bit of love, he needs an arm around him. Every time he comes on he impresses me. I just hope he’s not one of those that leaves and then we see the best of them.” Other changes are also expected behind the scenes with Mourinho due to hire Italian fitness coach Stefano Rapetti from Sampdoria in the wake of Rui Faria’s departure as assistant manager. Rapetti worked with Mourinho at Inter Milan. Kieran McKenna, United’s Under-18 coach, could also be promoted to the first team set up.
Pep Guardiola’s “relentless” pursuit of success and improvement will ensure there is no let-up from Manchester City next season, according to the club’s chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak. Al-Mubarak is convinced that the Premier League champions can get better under Guardiola and says the club have learnt some important mistakes from their past two failed title defences. Manchester United were the last team to defend the title, in 2009, but Al-Mubarak feels City are well equipped to build on this season’s dominance, which saw them become the first top flight club in English history to amass 100 points. “My expectation, and the manager’s expectation, is that this team will continue to improve,” he told City TV in his end of season interview. “We have a manager in Pep who is relentless. There is not going to be any content (with what we have done) or relaxation here, that I can assure you. “I have no doubt that this summer we are going to come back and be hungry, and be more aggressive and we’ll continue to grow and improve.” Asked whether City needed to sign better players and change elements of the squad to ensure there is no complacency and drop off and that the club finally mount a serious title defence, Al-Mubarak said: “It’s all of the above. We have real experiences, real learnings from how we managed our seasons following the last two times we won the league. “We’ve worked very hard over the last couple of years to build the squad, not just only for this season but for many seasons to come. This is a young squad. Many of our most talented players are under the age of 26.” City are working on a deal to sign Italy midfielder Jorginho although Napoli are thought to be demanding more than £60 million for the player, whom Guardiola wants to provide quality competition to Fernandinho at the base of the midfield. Guardiola also wants a versatile forward with numerous options being considered, including Leicester’s Riyad Mahrez. Kylian Mbappe, of Paris St-Germain, and Chelsea’s Eden Hazard are dream targets but City are conscious of how difficult they would be to sign. City followed up their 2012 title success with a dismal summer in the transfer market, when they missed out on Robin van Persie to United and signed Jack Rodwell, Scott Sinclair, Maicon, Javi Garcia and Matija Nastasic, none of whom were good enough to improve the side. Al-Mubarak is adamant City will not make the same misjudgements and insisted they would not compromise on quality or disrupt the harmony in the dressing room. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 “In terms of improving the squad, also we’ve had a lot of learnings over the past,” he said. “You don’t get to 100 points without a full, high-quality squad. “Any additions have to improve the squad. This is my biggest learning from the years of chairing this club. When winning, bringing new players in is a very important decision because you have a winning formula. “Whatever you’re going to add has to be a decision you don’t take very lightly at all. You have to bring in players that will strengthen, improve and add competition into the squad.” Pep Guardiola signed a contract extension which will keep him at the club until 2021 Credit: PA Guardiola signed a two year contract extension last week to tie him to City until June 2021 and Al-Mubarak said negotiations were straight forward. “This was not a hard discussion, this was, frankly, a conversation that was relatively easy,” he said. “I think we see eye-to-eye, we shook hands on it and are happy to continue this journey.”
Man City chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak convinced club will get even better under 'relentless' Pep Guardiola
Pep Guardiola’s “relentless” pursuit of success and improvement will ensure there is no let-up from Manchester City next season, according to the club’s chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak. Al-Mubarak is convinced that the Premier League champions can get better under Guardiola and says the club have learnt some important mistakes from their past two failed title defences. Manchester United were the last team to defend the title, in 2009, but Al-Mubarak feels City are well equipped to build on this season’s dominance, which saw them become the first top flight club in English history to amass 100 points. “My expectation, and the manager’s expectation, is that this team will continue to improve,” he told City TV in his end of season interview. “We have a manager in Pep who is relentless. There is not going to be any content (with what we have done) or relaxation here, that I can assure you. “I have no doubt that this summer we are going to come back and be hungry, and be more aggressive and we’ll continue to grow and improve.” Asked whether City needed to sign better players and change elements of the squad to ensure there is no complacency and drop off and that the club finally mount a serious title defence, Al-Mubarak said: “It’s all of the above. We have real experiences, real learnings from how we managed our seasons following the last two times we won the league. “We’ve worked very hard over the last couple of years to build the squad, not just only for this season but for many seasons to come. This is a young squad. Many of our most talented players are under the age of 26.” City are working on a deal to sign Italy midfielder Jorginho although Napoli are thought to be demanding more than £60 million for the player, whom Guardiola wants to provide quality competition to Fernandinho at the base of the midfield. Guardiola also wants a versatile forward with numerous options being considered, including Leicester’s Riyad Mahrez. Kylian Mbappe, of Paris St-Germain, and Chelsea’s Eden Hazard are dream targets but City are conscious of how difficult they would be to sign. City followed up their 2012 title success with a dismal summer in the transfer market, when they missed out on Robin van Persie to United and signed Jack Rodwell, Scott Sinclair, Maicon, Javi Garcia and Matija Nastasic, none of whom were good enough to improve the side. Al-Mubarak is adamant City will not make the same misjudgements and insisted they would not compromise on quality or disrupt the harmony in the dressing room. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 “In terms of improving the squad, also we’ve had a lot of learnings over the past,” he said. “You don’t get to 100 points without a full, high-quality squad. “Any additions have to improve the squad. This is my biggest learning from the years of chairing this club. When winning, bringing new players in is a very important decision because you have a winning formula. “Whatever you’re going to add has to be a decision you don’t take very lightly at all. You have to bring in players that will strengthen, improve and add competition into the squad.” Pep Guardiola signed a contract extension which will keep him at the club until 2021 Credit: PA Guardiola signed a two year contract extension last week to tie him to City until June 2021 and Al-Mubarak said negotiations were straight forward. “This was not a hard discussion, this was, frankly, a conversation that was relatively easy,” he said. “I think we see eye-to-eye, we shook hands on it and are happy to continue this journey.”
Pep Guardiola’s “relentless” pursuit of success and improvement will ensure there is no let-up from Manchester City next season, according to the club’s chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak. Al-Mubarak is convinced that the Premier League champions can get better under Guardiola and says the club have learnt some important mistakes from their past two failed title defences. Manchester United were the last team to defend the title, in 2009, but Al-Mubarak feels City are well equipped to build on this season’s dominance, which saw them become the first top flight club in English history to amass 100 points. “My expectation, and the manager’s expectation, is that this team will continue to improve,” he told City TV in his end of season interview. “We have a manager in Pep who is relentless. There is not going to be any content (with what we have done) or relaxation here, that I can assure you. “I have no doubt that this summer we are going to come back and be hungry, and be more aggressive and we’ll continue to grow and improve.” Asked whether City needed to sign better players and change elements of the squad to ensure there is no complacency and drop off and that the club finally mount a serious title defence, Al-Mubarak said: “It’s all of the above. We have real experiences, real learnings from how we managed our seasons following the last two times we won the league. “We’ve worked very hard over the last couple of years to build the squad, not just only for this season but for many seasons to come. This is a young squad. Many of our most talented players are under the age of 26.” City are working on a deal to sign Italy midfielder Jorginho although Napoli are thought to be demanding more than £60 million for the player, whom Guardiola wants to provide quality competition to Fernandinho at the base of the midfield. Guardiola also wants a versatile forward with numerous options being considered, including Leicester’s Riyad Mahrez. Kylian Mbappe, of Paris St-Germain, and Chelsea’s Eden Hazard are dream targets but City are conscious of how difficult they would be to sign. City followed up their 2012 title success with a dismal summer in the transfer market, when they missed out on Robin van Persie to United and signed Jack Rodwell, Scott Sinclair, Maicon, Javi Garcia and Matija Nastasic, none of whom were good enough to improve the side. Al-Mubarak is adamant City will not make the same misjudgements and insisted they would not compromise on quality or disrupt the harmony in the dressing room. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 “In terms of improving the squad, also we’ve had a lot of learnings over the past,” he said. “You don’t get to 100 points without a full, high-quality squad. “Any additions have to improve the squad. This is my biggest learning from the years of chairing this club. When winning, bringing new players in is a very important decision because you have a winning formula. “Whatever you’re going to add has to be a decision you don’t take very lightly at all. You have to bring in players that will strengthen, improve and add competition into the squad.” Pep Guardiola signed a contract extension which will keep him at the club until 2021 Credit: PA Guardiola signed a two year contract extension last week to tie him to City until June 2021 and Al-Mubarak said negotiations were straight forward. “This was not a hard discussion, this was, frankly, a conversation that was relatively easy,” he said. “I think we see eye-to-eye, we shook hands on it and are happy to continue this journey.”
Man City chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak convinced club will get even better under 'relentless' Pep Guardiola
Pep Guardiola’s “relentless” pursuit of success and improvement will ensure there is no let-up from Manchester City next season, according to the club’s chairman Khaldoon al-Mubarak. Al-Mubarak is convinced that the Premier League champions can get better under Guardiola and says the club have learnt some important mistakes from their past two failed title defences. Manchester United were the last team to defend the title, in 2009, but Al-Mubarak feels City are well equipped to build on this season’s dominance, which saw them become the first top flight club in English history to amass 100 points. “My expectation, and the manager’s expectation, is that this team will continue to improve,” he told City TV in his end of season interview. “We have a manager in Pep who is relentless. There is not going to be any content (with what we have done) or relaxation here, that I can assure you. “I have no doubt that this summer we are going to come back and be hungry, and be more aggressive and we’ll continue to grow and improve.” Asked whether City needed to sign better players and change elements of the squad to ensure there is no complacency and drop off and that the club finally mount a serious title defence, Al-Mubarak said: “It’s all of the above. We have real experiences, real learnings from how we managed our seasons following the last two times we won the league. “We’ve worked very hard over the last couple of years to build the squad, not just only for this season but for many seasons to come. This is a young squad. Many of our most talented players are under the age of 26.” City are working on a deal to sign Italy midfielder Jorginho although Napoli are thought to be demanding more than £60 million for the player, whom Guardiola wants to provide quality competition to Fernandinho at the base of the midfield. Guardiola also wants a versatile forward with numerous options being considered, including Leicester’s Riyad Mahrez. Kylian Mbappe, of Paris St-Germain, and Chelsea’s Eden Hazard are dream targets but City are conscious of how difficult they would be to sign. City followed up their 2012 title success with a dismal summer in the transfer market, when they missed out on Robin van Persie to United and signed Jack Rodwell, Scott Sinclair, Maicon, Javi Garcia and Matija Nastasic, none of whom were good enough to improve the side. Al-Mubarak is adamant City will not make the same misjudgements and insisted they would not compromise on quality or disrupt the harmony in the dressing room. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 “In terms of improving the squad, also we’ve had a lot of learnings over the past,” he said. “You don’t get to 100 points without a full, high-quality squad. “Any additions have to improve the squad. This is my biggest learning from the years of chairing this club. When winning, bringing new players in is a very important decision because you have a winning formula. “Whatever you’re going to add has to be a decision you don’t take very lightly at all. You have to bring in players that will strengthen, improve and add competition into the squad.” Pep Guardiola signed a contract extension which will keep him at the club until 2021 Credit: PA Guardiola signed a two year contract extension last week to tie him to City until June 2021 and Al-Mubarak said negotiations were straight forward. “This was not a hard discussion, this was, frankly, a conversation that was relatively easy,” he said. “I think we see eye-to-eye, we shook hands on it and are happy to continue this journey.”
Le joueur de Manchester United a évoqué le PSG et le cas de José Mourinho, son entraîneur en Premier League.
Paul Pogba sûr de rester à Manchester United "contractuellement"
Le joueur de Manchester United a évoqué le PSG et le cas de José Mourinho, son entraîneur en Premier League.
The 24-year-old’s wonder strike in October has been rewarded as the best goal in the English top-flight this season
Southampton’s Sofiane Boufal wins Premier League Goal of the Season award
The 24-year-old’s wonder strike in October has been rewarded as the best goal in the English top-flight this season
The 24-year-old’s wonder strike in October has been rewarded as the best goal in the English top-flight this season
Southampton’s Sofiane Boufal wins Premier League Goal of the Season award
The 24-year-old’s wonder strike in October has been rewarded as the best goal in the English top-flight this season
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
Manuel Pellegrini arrives at West Ham for manager role talks
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
Manuel Pellegrini arrives at West Ham for manager role talks
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
Manuel Pellegrini arrives at West Ham for manager role talks
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
Manuel Pellegrini arrives at West Ham for manager role talks
West Ham United are confident of naming Manuel Pellegrini as their new manager this week. The 64-year-old Chilean has travelled to London for talks having informed his current club, Hebei China Fortune, that he is leaving. The Chinese club then announced Pellegrini’s departure, expressing their “sincere gratitude” for his contribution to the team. There was a delay last week while West Ham struggled to speak to Pellegrini but negotiations are now under way. It is likely Pellegrini will be offered a three-year deal at West Ham following the decision not to retain David Moyes who left last week after his short-term deal at the club expired. Who WOULDN'T want to manage West Ham? Credit: Charlotte Wilson/Offside/Getty Images West Ham held talks with Paulo Fonseca, after he flew to London to meet with vice-owner David Sullivan, but the Portuguese then signed a new, enhanced two-year deal with Ukrainian club, Shakhtar Donetsk. Depending on which version of events is to be believed Fonseca either had misgivings about taking the West Ham job or the club deemed him too big a risk given the other candidates he was up against, including Pellegrini, who had previously worked in the Premier League. What was interesting was that Fonseca’s agent, Jorge Mendes, also travelled for the talks suggesting he would not do so if a deal was not on the table. So long: David Moyes waves goodbye to West Ham fans Credit: Reuters In fairness to West Ham they were always intent on speaking to other candidates and Pellegrini, who spent three years at Manchester City, winning the Premier League and taking them to the semi-finals of the Champions League, has always been a coach they admired. Pellegrini has won league titles in four different countries and has previously been in charge of Real Madrid, Villarreal and Malaga. West Ham also explored the possibility of hiring Rafael Benitez from Newcastle United with the Spaniard having come extremely close to joining the club before Slaven Bilic was appointed in June 2015. Indeed Benitez had agreed to take over until Real Madrid came in for him and West Ham stood aside. The 50 best players in the Premier League 2017/18 It is understood that Newcastle would expect £6million in compensation to release Benitez from his contract while he would want to bring a large backroom staff with him making the deal extremely expensive. West Ham have insisted they had a four-strong short-list of managers to succeed Moyes with all of them having won trophies and of the highest calibre. It is understood that list was Pellegrini, Benitez, Fonseca and Claudio Ranieri who has left French club Nantes. It has been possible that West Ham might hire Ranieri and reunite him with Steve Walsh, as chief scout, who has been replaced by Marcel Brands as director of football at Everton and who he worked with at Leicester City. Two fingers: Manuel Pellegrini, then manager of Man City, during a 2015 match vs West Ham. Man City won 2-0 Credit: AP If Pellegrini is appointed it would appear to raise the likelihood of West Ham signing Yaya Toure who is available as a free agent having been released by City at the end of his contract. The 35-year-old held talks with West Ham previously, when his wage demands were prohibitive, but now he is out-of-contract a deal may be more manageable and especially given his good relationship with Pellegrini.
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Transfer news & rumours LIVE: Messi talks Griezmann into Barca move
Goal takes a look at the biggest transfer news and rumours from the Premier League, La Liga, Serie A and beyond
There was a pang of regret in, post-match, reading Jesse Lingard’s assessment of his friend and Manchester United team-mate Marcus Rashford. “He’s young and he can be anything he wants to be,” Lingard commented in the FA Cup Final match programme as he gave the run down on the squad. “He might not have played as much as he would have liked to this season but when he has played or when he’s come on, he’s made an impact.” Both Rashford and Lingard – who England manager Gareth Southgate joked last week are so close that they almost walk around hand-in-hand – were hauled off together before the end of United’s defeat to Chelsea. Both looked dispirited; beaten and deserved the hook. The concern for United and, with a World Cup looming, for England is that while Lingard has flourished under Jose Mourinho the same cannot be said of Rashford who appears bereft of touch, confidence and that refreshing vigour and exciting belief he brought to the team when he made his break-through. Rashford’s style simply does not appear to suit Mourinho and Southgate has work to do ahead of Russia. Lingard alluded to the fact that Rashford has not played as much as he has wanted to but there have been 35 Premier League appearances by him this season, including 17 starts. But such has been the sense of marginalisation under Mourinho that it feels like he has been pushed out to the edges which is where he instinctively, and largely unproductively, headed on the Wembley pitch as he failed to be the target man. Rashford was one of United’s brightest stars when Mourinho arrived. He was a local player who brought renewed pride in United’s ability to develop talent during a tricky time for the club. It was said that a test of the suitability of the new manager was how he dealt with Rashford. Jose Mourinho's tough love treatment of Marcus Rashford has not helped him flourish Credit: GETTY IMAGES Mourinho was so aware of the accusation that he was untrusting of young players that he even produced an unconvincing list at his first press conference of those he had nurtured (it included Arjen Robben who was already a full Holland international). There have been murmurings that Rashford has not been happy at United this season, that he may even want out, and he looked like he had the weight of the world on his shoulders at Wembley where he appeared a Lukaku-lite, asked to be the battering ram centre-forward that Mourinho prefers in the absence of the Belgium international who the manager later suggested had absented himself from starting this match. Another United player thrown under the bus by the belligerent manager? Of course Rashford has to take responsibility for his own performances, despite his youth, such is the 20-year-old’s ability and his reputation. But was it also really necessary for Mourinho to be so obviously critical of him as he was following the recent defeat away to Brighton? Rashford was not named but it was clear who Mourinho meant when he said: “The players that replaced others did not perform at a good level and when individuals do that it is difficult for the team to play well. Maybe now you will not ask me why A, B and C do not play so much.” Was that really worth it for Mourinho? What purpose did it serve? It did not seem helpful here. Rashford lacked support and it showed and criticism of United’s performance should concentrate on their big names: Alexis Sanchez and, until he woke up in the second-half, Paul Pogba and Mourinho’s unwillingness to adapt to help his young striker. Rashford is not Lukaku so when the manager later said “I knew that without a target man it would be difficult for us” he should take responsibility. Maybe Sanchez should have played through the middle because it is a role that is asking a lot of Rashford even if he craves it. When Rashford mis-hit an attempted pass Mourinho reacted furiously and this kind of stuff transmits itself out on the pitch where United feel inhibited, shackled and unable to play with any sense of risk or creativity. Antonio Conte knew it, also. His trap was set and United did not have the guile to side-step it. Mourinho complained that he was facing a “team so predictable it is easy to adapt to it”. But that betrayed a remarkable lack of self-awareness. It was so easy? So what did he fall into that trap. He knew Eden Hazard could be the match-winner but he could not stifle him during a first-half in which the forward drew a fine save from David De Gea and then won and converted the penalty that made the difference as he embarrassed Phil Jones. And embarrassed Mourinho. FA Cup final player ratings After half-time United were far better and far more urgent, as they have been in second-halves this season, but why did not they try and capitalise on Chelsea’s uncertainty and the expectation that this would be Conte’s last game in charge to press home the advantage they appeared to have? There are so many questions to answer for Mourinho who haughtily dismissed any criticism. Once in front Chelsea defended superbly; it was something of a masterclass. They defended in a way that Mourinho would have done with outstanding performances from Antonio Rudiger and the resurgent Gary Cahill and the midfield shield of N’Golo Kante. And they deserved this victory despite opportunities being spurned by Pogba, with a header, and Rashford with a shot which was parried by Thibaut Courtois while Sanchez had a ‘goal’ correctly ruled out for offside. Mourinho said Chelsea had no chances but Marcos Alonso probably wasted the best one of all because he did not trust his right-foot. And so it was the first time that Mourinho had lost a domestic cup final in England and the first that Conte had won. Ever. One manager is, more than likely going, and the other will stay. But whatever the constructs and arguments this has not been a good season for Mourinho and not least for the way Rashford has failed to progress under him.
Marcus Rashford has lost his spark under Jose Mourinho's management
There was a pang of regret in, post-match, reading Jesse Lingard’s assessment of his friend and Manchester United team-mate Marcus Rashford. “He’s young and he can be anything he wants to be,” Lingard commented in the FA Cup Final match programme as he gave the run down on the squad. “He might not have played as much as he would have liked to this season but when he has played or when he’s come on, he’s made an impact.” Both Rashford and Lingard – who England manager Gareth Southgate joked last week are so close that they almost walk around hand-in-hand – were hauled off together before the end of United’s defeat to Chelsea. Both looked dispirited; beaten and deserved the hook. The concern for United and, with a World Cup looming, for England is that while Lingard has flourished under Jose Mourinho the same cannot be said of Rashford who appears bereft of touch, confidence and that refreshing vigour and exciting belief he brought to the team when he made his break-through. Rashford’s style simply does not appear to suit Mourinho and Southgate has work to do ahead of Russia. Lingard alluded to the fact that Rashford has not played as much as he has wanted to but there have been 35 Premier League appearances by him this season, including 17 starts. But such has been the sense of marginalisation under Mourinho that it feels like he has been pushed out to the edges which is where he instinctively, and largely unproductively, headed on the Wembley pitch as he failed to be the target man. Rashford was one of United’s brightest stars when Mourinho arrived. He was a local player who brought renewed pride in United’s ability to develop talent during a tricky time for the club. It was said that a test of the suitability of the new manager was how he dealt with Rashford. Jose Mourinho's tough love treatment of Marcus Rashford has not helped him flourish Credit: GETTY IMAGES Mourinho was so aware of the accusation that he was untrusting of young players that he even produced an unconvincing list at his first press conference of those he had nurtured (it included Arjen Robben who was already a full Holland international). There have been murmurings that Rashford has not been happy at United this season, that he may even want out, and he looked like he had the weight of the world on his shoulders at Wembley where he appeared a Lukaku-lite, asked to be the battering ram centre-forward that Mourinho prefers in the absence of the Belgium international who the manager later suggested had absented himself from starting this match. Another United player thrown under the bus by the belligerent manager? Of course Rashford has to take responsibility for his own performances, despite his youth, such is the 20-year-old’s ability and his reputation. But was it also really necessary for Mourinho to be so obviously critical of him as he was following the recent defeat away to Brighton? Rashford was not named but it was clear who Mourinho meant when he said: “The players that replaced others did not perform at a good level and when individuals do that it is difficult for the team to play well. Maybe now you will not ask me why A, B and C do not play so much.” Was that really worth it for Mourinho? What purpose did it serve? It did not seem helpful here. Rashford lacked support and it showed and criticism of United’s performance should concentrate on their big names: Alexis Sanchez and, until he woke up in the second-half, Paul Pogba and Mourinho’s unwillingness to adapt to help his young striker. Rashford is not Lukaku so when the manager later said “I knew that without a target man it would be difficult for us” he should take responsibility. Maybe Sanchez should have played through the middle because it is a role that is asking a lot of Rashford even if he craves it. When Rashford mis-hit an attempted pass Mourinho reacted furiously and this kind of stuff transmits itself out on the pitch where United feel inhibited, shackled and unable to play with any sense of risk or creativity. Antonio Conte knew it, also. His trap was set and United did not have the guile to side-step it. Mourinho complained that he was facing a “team so predictable it is easy to adapt to it”. But that betrayed a remarkable lack of self-awareness. It was so easy? So what did he fall into that trap. He knew Eden Hazard could be the match-winner but he could not stifle him during a first-half in which the forward drew a fine save from David De Gea and then won and converted the penalty that made the difference as he embarrassed Phil Jones. And embarrassed Mourinho. FA Cup final player ratings After half-time United were far better and far more urgent, as they have been in second-halves this season, but why did not they try and capitalise on Chelsea’s uncertainty and the expectation that this would be Conte’s last game in charge to press home the advantage they appeared to have? There are so many questions to answer for Mourinho who haughtily dismissed any criticism. Once in front Chelsea defended superbly; it was something of a masterclass. They defended in a way that Mourinho would have done with outstanding performances from Antonio Rudiger and the resurgent Gary Cahill and the midfield shield of N’Golo Kante. And they deserved this victory despite opportunities being spurned by Pogba, with a header, and Rashford with a shot which was parried by Thibaut Courtois while Sanchez had a ‘goal’ correctly ruled out for offside. Mourinho said Chelsea had no chances but Marcos Alonso probably wasted the best one of all because he did not trust his right-foot. And so it was the first time that Mourinho had lost a domestic cup final in England and the first that Conte had won. Ever. One manager is, more than likely going, and the other will stay. But whatever the constructs and arguments this has not been a good season for Mourinho and not least for the way Rashford has failed to progress under him.
There was a pang of regret in, post-match, reading Jesse Lingard’s assessment of his friend and Manchester United team-mate Marcus Rashford. “He’s young and he can be anything he wants to be,” Lingard commented in the FA Cup Final match programme as he gave the run down on the squad. “He might not have played as much as he would have liked to this season but when he has played or when he’s come on, he’s made an impact.” Both Rashford and Lingard – who England manager Gareth Southgate joked last week are so close that they almost walk around hand-in-hand – were hauled off together before the end of United’s defeat to Chelsea. Both looked dispirited; beaten and deserved the hook. The concern for United and, with a World Cup looming, for England is that while Lingard has flourished under Jose Mourinho the same cannot be said of Rashford who appears bereft of touch, confidence and that refreshing vigour and exciting belief he brought to the team when he made his break-through. Rashford’s style simply does not appear to suit Mourinho and Southgate has work to do ahead of Russia. Lingard alluded to the fact that Rashford has not played as much as he has wanted to but there have been 35 Premier League appearances by him this season, including 17 starts. But such has been the sense of marginalisation under Mourinho that it feels like he has been pushed out to the edges which is where he instinctively, and largely unproductively, headed on the Wembley pitch as he failed to be the target man. Rashford was one of United’s brightest stars when Mourinho arrived. He was a local player who brought renewed pride in United’s ability to develop talent during a tricky time for the club. It was said that a test of the suitability of the new manager was how he dealt with Rashford. Jose Mourinho's tough love treatment of Marcus Rashford has not helped him flourish Credit: GETTY IMAGES Mourinho was so aware of the accusation that he was untrusting of young players that he even produced an unconvincing list at his first press conference of those he had nurtured (it included Arjen Robben who was already a full Holland international). There have been murmurings that Rashford has not been happy at United this season, that he may even want out, and he looked like he had the weight of the world on his shoulders at Wembley where he appeared a Lukaku-lite, asked to be the battering ram centre-forward that Mourinho prefers in the absence of the Belgium international who the manager later suggested had absented himself from starting this match. Another United player thrown under the bus by the belligerent manager? Of course Rashford has to take responsibility for his own performances, despite his youth, such is the 20-year-old’s ability and his reputation. But was it also really necessary for Mourinho to be so obviously critical of him as he was following the recent defeat away to Brighton? Rashford was not named but it was clear who Mourinho meant when he said: “The players that replaced others did not perform at a good level and when individuals do that it is difficult for the team to play well. Maybe now you will not ask me why A, B and C do not play so much.” Was that really worth it for Mourinho? What purpose did it serve? It did not seem helpful here. Rashford lacked support and it showed and criticism of United’s performance should concentrate on their big names: Alexis Sanchez and, until he woke up in the second-half, Paul Pogba and Mourinho’s unwillingness to adapt to help his young striker. Rashford is not Lukaku so when the manager later said “I knew that without a target man it would be difficult for us” he should take responsibility. Maybe Sanchez should have played through the middle because it is a role that is asking a lot of Rashford even if he craves it. When Rashford mis-hit an attempted pass Mourinho reacted furiously and this kind of stuff transmits itself out on the pitch where United feel inhibited, shackled and unable to play with any sense of risk or creativity. Antonio Conte knew it, also. His trap was set and United did not have the guile to side-step it. Mourinho complained that he was facing a “team so predictable it is easy to adapt to it”. But that betrayed a remarkable lack of self-awareness. It was so easy? So what did he fall into that trap. He knew Eden Hazard could be the match-winner but he could not stifle him during a first-half in which the forward drew a fine save from David De Gea and then won and converted the penalty that made the difference as he embarrassed Phil Jones. And embarrassed Mourinho. FA Cup final player ratings After half-time United were far better and far more urgent, as they have been in second-halves this season, but why did not they try and capitalise on Chelsea’s uncertainty and the expectation that this would be Conte’s last game in charge to press home the advantage they appeared to have? There are so many questions to answer for Mourinho who haughtily dismissed any criticism. Once in front Chelsea defended superbly; it was something of a masterclass. They defended in a way that Mourinho would have done with outstanding performances from Antonio Rudiger and the resurgent Gary Cahill and the midfield shield of N’Golo Kante. And they deserved this victory despite opportunities being spurned by Pogba, with a header, and Rashford with a shot which was parried by Thibaut Courtois while Sanchez had a ‘goal’ correctly ruled out for offside. Mourinho said Chelsea had no chances but Marcos Alonso probably wasted the best one of all because he did not trust his right-foot. And so it was the first time that Mourinho had lost a domestic cup final in England and the first that Conte had won. Ever. One manager is, more than likely going, and the other will stay. But whatever the constructs and arguments this has not been a good season for Mourinho and not least for the way Rashford has failed to progress under him.
Marcus Rashford has lost his spark under Jose Mourinho's management
There was a pang of regret in, post-match, reading Jesse Lingard’s assessment of his friend and Manchester United team-mate Marcus Rashford. “He’s young and he can be anything he wants to be,” Lingard commented in the FA Cup Final match programme as he gave the run down on the squad. “He might not have played as much as he would have liked to this season but when he has played or when he’s come on, he’s made an impact.” Both Rashford and Lingard – who England manager Gareth Southgate joked last week are so close that they almost walk around hand-in-hand – were hauled off together before the end of United’s defeat to Chelsea. Both looked dispirited; beaten and deserved the hook. The concern for United and, with a World Cup looming, for England is that while Lingard has flourished under Jose Mourinho the same cannot be said of Rashford who appears bereft of touch, confidence and that refreshing vigour and exciting belief he brought to the team when he made his break-through. Rashford’s style simply does not appear to suit Mourinho and Southgate has work to do ahead of Russia. Lingard alluded to the fact that Rashford has not played as much as he has wanted to but there have been 35 Premier League appearances by him this season, including 17 starts. But such has been the sense of marginalisation under Mourinho that it feels like he has been pushed out to the edges which is where he instinctively, and largely unproductively, headed on the Wembley pitch as he failed to be the target man. Rashford was one of United’s brightest stars when Mourinho arrived. He was a local player who brought renewed pride in United’s ability to develop talent during a tricky time for the club. It was said that a test of the suitability of the new manager was how he dealt with Rashford. Jose Mourinho's tough love treatment of Marcus Rashford has not helped him flourish Credit: GETTY IMAGES Mourinho was so aware of the accusation that he was untrusting of young players that he even produced an unconvincing list at his first press conference of those he had nurtured (it included Arjen Robben who was already a full Holland international). There have been murmurings that Rashford has not been happy at United this season, that he may even want out, and he looked like he had the weight of the world on his shoulders at Wembley where he appeared a Lukaku-lite, asked to be the battering ram centre-forward that Mourinho prefers in the absence of the Belgium international who the manager later suggested had absented himself from starting this match. Another United player thrown under the bus by the belligerent manager? Of course Rashford has to take responsibility for his own performances, despite his youth, such is the 20-year-old’s ability and his reputation. But was it also really necessary for Mourinho to be so obviously critical of him as he was following the recent defeat away to Brighton? Rashford was not named but it was clear who Mourinho meant when he said: “The players that replaced others did not perform at a good level and when individuals do that it is difficult for the team to play well. Maybe now you will not ask me why A, B and C do not play so much.” Was that really worth it for Mourinho? What purpose did it serve? It did not seem helpful here. Rashford lacked support and it showed and criticism of United’s performance should concentrate on their big names: Alexis Sanchez and, until he woke up in the second-half, Paul Pogba and Mourinho’s unwillingness to adapt to help his young striker. Rashford is not Lukaku so when the manager later said “I knew that without a target man it would be difficult for us” he should take responsibility. Maybe Sanchez should have played through the middle because it is a role that is asking a lot of Rashford even if he craves it. When Rashford mis-hit an attempted pass Mourinho reacted furiously and this kind of stuff transmits itself out on the pitch where United feel inhibited, shackled and unable to play with any sense of risk or creativity. Antonio Conte knew it, also. His trap was set and United did not have the guile to side-step it. Mourinho complained that he was facing a “team so predictable it is easy to adapt to it”. But that betrayed a remarkable lack of self-awareness. It was so easy? So what did he fall into that trap. He knew Eden Hazard could be the match-winner but he could not stifle him during a first-half in which the forward drew a fine save from David De Gea and then won and converted the penalty that made the difference as he embarrassed Phil Jones. And embarrassed Mourinho. FA Cup final player ratings After half-time United were far better and far more urgent, as they have been in second-halves this season, but why did not they try and capitalise on Chelsea’s uncertainty and the expectation that this would be Conte’s last game in charge to press home the advantage they appeared to have? There are so many questions to answer for Mourinho who haughtily dismissed any criticism. Once in front Chelsea defended superbly; it was something of a masterclass. They defended in a way that Mourinho would have done with outstanding performances from Antonio Rudiger and the resurgent Gary Cahill and the midfield shield of N’Golo Kante. And they deserved this victory despite opportunities being spurned by Pogba, with a header, and Rashford with a shot which was parried by Thibaut Courtois while Sanchez had a ‘goal’ correctly ruled out for offside. Mourinho said Chelsea had no chances but Marcos Alonso probably wasted the best one of all because he did not trust his right-foot. And so it was the first time that Mourinho had lost a domestic cup final in England and the first that Conte had won. Ever. One manager is, more than likely going, and the other will stay. But whatever the constructs and arguments this has not been a good season for Mourinho and not least for the way Rashford has failed to progress under him.
Courtois, whose contract is about to expire, was asked if Chelsea needed to bolster their squad if they were to make a title challenge next season.
Premier League: Chelsea need to spend heavily to reclaim title next season, says Thibaut Courtois
Courtois, whose contract is about to expire, was asked if Chelsea needed to bolster their squad if they were to make a title challenge next season.
FILE PHOTO: Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands
FILE PHOTO: Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
FILE PHOTO: Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands
FILE PHOTO: Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic admits Manchester United need to sign 'a few more players' to challenge for Premier League title
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
United need a 'few more good players' to compete for title - Matic
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
United need a 'few more good players' to compete for title - Matic
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
United need a 'few more good players' to compete for title - Matic
Nemanja Matic believes Manchester United must make signings to compete for the Premier League title next season.
Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands
Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich in the stands Action Images via Reuters / John Sibley Livepic
The 19-year-old midfielder scored his first professional goal for the Red Bulls during the 2015 International Champions Cup against Premier League giants Chelsea.
Report: USMNT mid Tyler Adams nearing Red Bull Leipzig move
The 19-year-old midfielder scored his first professional goal for the Red Bulls during the 2015 International Champions Cup against Premier League giants Chelsea.
The 19-year-old midfielder scored his first professional goal for the Red Bulls during the 2015 International Champions Cup against Premier League giants Chelsea.
Report: USMNT mid Tyler Adams nearing Red Bull Leipzig move
The 19-year-old midfielder scored his first professional goal for the Red Bulls during the 2015 International Champions Cup against Premier League giants Chelsea.
Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League Reuters / Hannah McKay Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League
Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League Reuters / Hannah McKay Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
There is no doubt that Mohamed Salah has been on fire this season. With 32 goals in the Premier League this season, he was the Golden Boot winner and his fantastic form could see him compete Messi and CR7 for the Ballon d'Or. However, Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp believes it will take Mo Salah 15 years to match Real Madrid superstar Cristiano Ronaldo.
Jurgen Klopp: Salah will take 15 years to match CR7
There is no doubt that Mohamed Salah has been on fire this season. With 32 goals in the Premier League this season, he was the Golden Boot winner and his fantastic form could see him compete Messi and CR7 for the Ballon d'Or. However, Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp believes it will take Mo Salah 15 years to match Real Madrid superstar Cristiano Ronaldo.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Ricardo Pereira arrive à Leicester
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Ricardo Pereira arrive à Leicester
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Ricardo Pereira arrive à Leicester
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Ricardo Pereira arrive à Leicester
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
Infos mercato et rumeurs de transfert en direct : Ricardo Pereira arrive à Leicester
Goal fait le tour des dernières infos transferts et rumeurs de mercato en Ligue 1, Serie A, Premier League, Liga et Bundesliga.
FA00010. London (United Kingdom), 19/12/2015.- (FILE) Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich watches the game from the stands against Sunderland during the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge in London, Britain, 19 December 2015 (reissued 20 May 2018). According to reports on 20 May 2018, Abramovich did not attend Chelsea'Äôs 1-0 win in the FA Cup final after his visa expired last month. (Londres) EFE/EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
FA00010. London (United Kingdom), 19/12/2015.- (FILE) Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich watches the game from the stands against Sunderland during the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge in London, Britain, 19 December 2015 (reissued 20 May 2018). According to reports on 20 May 2018, Abramovich did not attend Chelsea'Äôs 1-0 win in the FA Cup final after his visa expired last month. (Londres) EFE/EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
FA00010. London (United Kingdom), 19/12/2015.- (FILE) Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich watches the game from the stands against Sunderland during the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge in London, Britain, 19 December 2015 (reissued 20 May 2018). According to reports on 20 May 2018, Abramovich did not attend Chelsea'Äôs 1-0 win in the FA Cup final after his visa expired last month. (Londres) EFE/EPA/FACUNDO ARRIZABALAGA EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or 'live' services. Online in-match use limited to 75 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications
Der russische Besitzer des FC Chelsea Roman Abramowitsch hat offenbar kein Visum mehr und kann daher nicht nach Großbritannien einreisen. Das berichtet die russische Nachrichtenagentur TASS .
Premier League: Einreiseverweigerung nach UK? Abramowitsch hat offenbar kein Visum
Der russische Besitzer des FC Chelsea Roman Abramowitsch hat offenbar kein Visum mehr und kann daher nicht nach Großbritannien einreisen. Das berichtet die russische Nachrichtenagentur TASS .
Catch all the highlights from the 55th game of the 2018 Indian Premier League between Delhi Daredevils and Mumbai Indians.
DD vs MI IPL 2018 highlights: Delhi win by 11 runs, Mumbai eliminated
Catch all the highlights from the 55th game of the 2018 Indian Premier League between Delhi Daredevils and Mumbai Indians.
Catch all the highlights from the 55th game of the 2018 Indian Premier League between Delhi Daredevils and Mumbai Indians.
DD vs MI IPL 2018 highlights: Delhi win by 11 runs, Mumbai eliminated
Catch all the highlights from the 55th game of the 2018 Indian Premier League between Delhi Daredevils and Mumbai Indians.
Mit Portugal zur WM und danach nach Leicester: Ricardo Pereira verlässt den FC Porto und schließt sich dem Premier-League-Meister von 2015/16 an.
Bestätigt: Leicester City holt Rechtsverteidiger Ricardo Pereira vom FC Porto
Mit Portugal zur WM und danach nach Leicester: Ricardo Pereira verlässt den FC Porto und schließt sich dem Premier-League-Meister von 2015/16 an.
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: A Very English Scandal, The Handmaid’s Tale, Patrick Melrose and more
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: A Very English Scandal, The Handmaid’s Tale, Patrick Melrose and more
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
What's on TV tonight: A Very English Scandal, The Handmaid’s Tale, Patrick Melrose and more
Sunday 20 May A Very English Scandal BBC One, 9.00pm A crack cast and a nimble script make this new three-part adaptation of journalist John Preston’s non-fiction novel about the Jeremy Thorpe affair a delight. The facts of the Sixties political scandal are well known: Thorpe (Hugh Grant), a charismatic star MP of the Liberal party, had a secret relationship with a vulnerable young man called Norman Josiffe (Ben Whishaw). Once the tryst was over, Josiffe started to make financial and emotional demands on Thorpe, threatening the latter’s career and prompting him to take drastic action. Aided by Preston’s rollicking account, writer Russell T Davies and veteran director Stephen Frears take the bones of these events and, with whip-smart aplomb, flesh out the jaw-dropping machinations underpinning them. The pair’s lightness of touch, zipping from farce to melodrama, never clouds the serious issues behind the sensational outcome, both cultural (homosexuality was still illegal) and personal (the establishment’s exploitation of Josiffe). Grant, not seen on TV since the 1990s, is a sublime mix of charm and ruthlessness, while Whishaw expertly captures Josiffe’s volatility. It’s a treat. TD Feel the Spirit: A Celebration for Pentecost BBC One, 10.00am Live from St Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Revd Dr Sam Wells and Rt Rev Sarah Mullally lead this upbeat service honouring Pentecost. The setting for mass is Will Todd’s Jazz Missa Brevis. TD RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2018 BBC One, 6.00pm BBC One begins its coverage of the annual horticultural extravaganza with Sophie Haworth and Joe Swift guiding us through the gardens on display this year. Floella Benjamin also looks at an exhibit celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Windrush generation. TD The Handmaid’s Tale Channel 4, 9.00pm A brutal opening scene, in which we learn the consequences of Offred’s (Elisabeth Moss) rebellion, sets the tone for the harrowing second series of this much-feted dystopian drama. A typically zealous Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) drives the fallout. TD Patrick Melrose Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Any questions over whether Edward St Aubyn’s semi-autobiographic novel series would work on the TV were answered by last week’s coruscating opening episode. This week, we travel back to Melrose’s childhood in Sixties France. We find a lonely Patrick (Sebastian Maltz) stuck in an icily indifferent household, where comings and goings are presided over by his terrifying, capricious father David (Hugo Weaving), and his disassociated pill-popping, alcoholic mother Eleanor (Jennifer Jason-Leigh) offers little in the way of protection. TD Dina BBC Four, 10.00pm This tender, moving documentary has a depth that belies its simple premise. The film follows a middle-aged, autistic couple as they prepare for their wedding day. Directors Dan Sickles and Antonio Santini keep a respectful, unobtrusive distance as we watch the hugely likeable bride and groom negotiate their relationship with quirky intelligence. TD Imagine: Rupert Everett: Born To Be Wilde BBC One, 10.30pm; NI, 11.30pm; Scot, 11.15pm Alan Yentob follows the splendidly candid Rupert Everett as he plans to write, direct and star in a film about the last days of Oscar Wilde. What was meant to be a year-long shoot has turned into five, as Everett battles to get his passion project off the ground. TD Cinderella (2015) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 3.00pm Kenneth Branagh’s twinkling, live-action Cinderella sticks doggedly to Disney’s Fifties animated version (Cinders’s rodent companions are present) and favours sparkle over wit. However, Cate Blanchett is marvellous as the Wicked Stepmother and Helena Bonham Carter makes a jolly good Fairy Godmother. Princess-obsessed little girls will find it irresistible and the costumes are stunning. The Dam Busters (1955, b/w) ★★★★☆ Film4, 4.20pm This is a much-loved film version of the Second World War air raid. The RAF are struggling to destroy German dams so engineer Barnes Wallis (Michael Redgrave) dreams up a bomb that can do the job. And it’s rather left field – the bomb will be dropped from a plane and bounce along the water like a skimmed stone. Lord of the Rings’s Peter Jackson has long-promised a modern remake, written by Stephen Fry. Jurassic World (2015) ★★★☆☆ ITV2, 8.00pm Can modern audiences still be wowed by computer-generated dinosaurs? This Jurassic Park sequel (the original movie was released in 1993) proves that they can. A new attraction at the dinosaur theme park, created to re-spark visitor interest, backfires and it’s left to Chris Pratt’s raptor trainer and Bryce Dallas Howard’s scientist to save the day. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is out on June 6. Monday 21 May Stemming the tide: Manchester Imam Irfan Chishti Manchester: A Year of Hate Crimes Channel 4, 10.35pm The best – and most shocking – moments of this documentary, which focuses on anti-Muslim hate crimes in Manchester after the 2017 Arena bombings, come when the victims speak for themselves. “It’s something that will always stick with me,” says one young girl about the abuse shouted at her. Talking about an attack on her mother, another, even younger, notes: “I don’t know why they did it,” before correcting herself. “Maybe cos we’re different from them.” We see local Imam Irfan Chishti try to counter the rising tension within the city, a tension that far-right activist Tommy Robinson is quick to capitalise on. There are times when the film’s desire to simply record events as they unfold threatens to undermine the message – Robinson, in particular, is given what feels like a disproportionate amount of air time. However, the lack of comment pays off during the film’s most powerful scenes, as the police interview a member of a group of apparently unconcerned children accused of stamping on another boy’s head while racially abusing him. It’s a chilling moment and one that contrasts both the outpouring of compassion and the spate of racial hatred following the bombing. SH Jamie’s Quick & Easy Food Channel 4, 8.00pm Jamie Oliver returns with the second series of his show focusing on easy family-centric cooking. This is Oliver stripped back-to-basics and all the better for it as he presents a series of simple but tasty-looking recipes. SH The NHS Heroes Awards ITV, 8.30pm We’re used to televised acting awards but tonight brings us some very worthy recipients indeed, as ITV celebrates 70 years of the NHS. Paul O’Grady hosts and the Duke of Cambridge and Boy George are among those handing out gongs. SH Robbie’s War: The Rise and Fall of a Playboy Billionaire BBC Two, 9.00pm; Scot, 11.15pm Property tycoon Robbie Tchenguiz was one of Britain’s richest men, before losing billions in the financial crash, then being arrested (and later cleared) for fraud. This documentary examines his decade-long battle to clear his name and save his remaining assets while suing everyone from Icelandic bank Kaupthing to the Serious Fraud Squad. SH Royal Wives at War BBC Four, 9.00pm This is a timely repeat of the 2016 docu-drama about the difficult relationship between Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and Wallis Simpson. Emma Davies and Gina McKee star as the mother and daughter-in-law, while Lady Colin Campbell and biographer Andrew Morton are among those lending their expertise. SH 24 Hours in Police Custody Channel 4, 9.00pm The fly-on-the-wall series returns with a complex episode centred around the discovery of a body in a field. Police suspicion falls on the dead woman’s partner, a possible fantasist with a tendency to say the wrong thing. SH Westworld Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Fans finally get what they’ve been waiting for with the confirmation that Maeve (Thandie Newton), Simon (Lee Sizemore), Armistice (Ingrid Bolso Berdal) and co are in Shogun World. Cue a set of expert references to Japanese films leading up to a beautifully shot, blood-drenched scene. SH Elementary Sky Living, 9.00pm The acclaimed Jonny Lee Millar/Lucy Liu incarnation of Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson returns for a sixth series with things taking a notably darker turn as Sherlock is given some life-changing news. SH Frida (2002) ★★★★☆ AMC, 4.40pm Oscar-nominated Salma Hayek is mesmerising as fiery Mexican painter Frida Kahlo (1907-54) in this biopic by Julie Taymor (best known for directing the stage musical The Lion King). At the heart of the story is her stormy, passionate romance with fellow artist Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), from whom she demands loyalty but not fidelity, leaving them free to take lovers; among hers are Leon Trotsky and Josephine Baker. Spy (2015) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 9.00pm Melissa McCarthy’s bid to be 008 is a feminist action-comedy spoof of the least feminist genre in film. She plays a CIA analyst, who’s given a mission of her own – and all of a sudden Miss Moneypenny is unleashed. Without reaching the heights of Bridesmaids, this McCarthy vehicle chugs along entertainingly thanks to her killer comic timing and the witty use of Jason Statham as meathead operative. Tuesday 22 May Survivor’s story: Erin (left) relives the Manchester attack Manchester Bomb: Our Story BBC Two, 9.00pm One year on from the Manchester Arena bomb that killed 23, including the suicide bomber Salman Abedi, this documentary looks in forensic detail at what happened. Starting with poignant testimony from young concertgoers, the film hears from the teenagers and their parents, who describe the force of the blast, of finding themselves on fire or with others’ body parts in their hair. Along with this, previously unseen mobile phone footage of the carnage and audio recordings from the emergency services bring home the chaos that ensued. The film looks at Abedi’s motives and speaks to people who knew him, including his former headteacher, as well as to David Anderson QC, the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, who discusses the young Mancunian’s status as a terrorist threat. It also hears from eyewitnesses and members of British Transport Police, who express their frustration at the slow response of the emergency services (neither Greater Manchester Police nor the Fire Service appear in the film). With a ticking clock on-screen informing viewers of the timescale, this powerful retelling makes clear that lessons need to be learned. VP Voices in My Head BBC Three, from 10.00am This documentary gives a vivid insight into what it’s like to suffer from a mental illness that causes you to hear voices. As three people tell their stories, their inner voices, recorded by actors and played in voice-over, means that viewers experience what sufferers hear to better understand their torment. It’s particularly distressing to hear the voices heard by sufferers Kyle and Chaz, which regularly urge them to commit suicide. VP Love Your Garden: NHS Special ITV, 8.00pm It’s good to see that Alan Titchmarsh is keeping busy during the Chelsea Flower Show by doing good work for victims of last May’s Manchester bomb attack. Responding to patients’ letters, Titchmarsh creates a garden oasis at the city’s children’s hospital. VP Amazing Spaces Special: 24 Hour Build Channel 4, 8.00pm Channelling the frantic vibe of Challenge Anneka, George Clarke’s property series decides to erect an unusual dwelling in just a day. Clarke and a team of builders brave inclement weather to build a lakeside cabin in Machynlleth in Wales using local materials. VP A&E Live ITV, 9.00pm As presenter of The Jump, Davina McCall knows all about emergency-room dashes. Now she’s back in an A&E fronting this live docu-series from Leeds General Infirmary that will follow medics as they tackle whatever comes through the casualty ward doors – presumably, a lot of surprised patients. VP Tate Britain’s Sky Arts Walks Sky Arts, 9.00pm Artist Harriet Walter enjoys an art history lesson with historian Gus Casely-Hayford in this edition of the series that mixes celebrities and fine art. On trips to Brighton and London, Casely-Hayford introduces the actress to the work of Walter Sickert, an avant-garde artist who painted the underclass but was overlooked in favour of his contemporaries. Casely-Hayford’s passion should have viewers flocking to the Tate. VP Mo Salah: A Football Fairy Tale Channel 4, 10.00pm Steven Gerrard and Gary Lineker are among the luminaries paying tribute to Liverpool FC’s wunderkind Mo Salah, who’s had one of the greatest maiden seasons ever at a Premier League club. This engaging biopic charts Salah’s rise from his humble beginnings in Egypt. VP Doctor Strange (2016) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Superheroes, 8.00pm Benedict Cumberbatch’s trippy, witty Doctor Strange (based on the Marvel Comics character who learns the mystic arts after a career-ending car accident) will turn your world upside down. With its sombre colour palette, whispery Eastern mysticism and dry stabs of comedy, Scott Derrickson’s blockbuster stands apart while feeling naggingly similar to the work of Christopher Nolan. Fahrenheit 451 (2018) Sky Atlantic, 9.00pm Ray Bradbury’s 1953 dystopian novel, in which books are outlawed in a future American society and “firemen” burn any that are found, has been given another remake (following François Truffaut’s 1966 version). The reception for this one, directed by Ramin Bahrani, has been muted – it premiered at Cannes film festival last week – and is a straight to TV production for HBO. Black Panther star Michael B Jordan takes the lead, with Michael Shannon offering menacing support. Easy Rider (1969) ★★★★☆ 5Spike, 11.00pm Along with Bonnie and Clyde and The Graduate, Easy Rider helped to pave the way for films that challenged conventional Hollywood ideas. Made on a low-budget, this nihilistic tale of two disaffected bikers (played by Peter Fonda and Dennis Hopper) embracing the open road on their motorbikes has become synonymous with the Sixties counter-culture movement and is quite simply one of the greatest road movies ever made. Wednesday 23 May In or out: following a group of MEPs as they prepare for Brexit Carry on Brussels Channel 4, 10.00pm This new docu-series aims to be a light-hearted take on the European Parliament in the same vein as shows such as Inside the Tube and Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport. Narrated by a droll Robert Bathurst, tonight’s opener follows two chalk-and-cheese MEPs, Ukip’s Brexit spokesman Gerard Batten and fervent Labour remainer Seb Dance, through a working week in the halls of European power. It is probably unintentional, but a better advert for leaving the EU could not be offered up. Batten, with seemingly little to do, spends his time setting out Union Jack flags on UK MEPs’ desks and trying to raise press interest in his Brexit strategy document that even Ukip’s PR man thinks will be a dud. Dance – when he’s not weeping over Brexit – mounts a campaign to become a parliamentary player by writing a strategy document on sustainability (possibly: the show is short on detail) that goes through a tortuously dull voting procedure, before, it appears, ending up on the EU’s big pile of reports. Instead of providing light entertainment or serious insight into the EU’s inner workings, the film is about as engaging as Dance and Batten’s inconsequential reports. VP Heathrow: Britain’s Busiest Airport ITV, 8.00pm; UTV, 10.45pm There’s trouble in the terminals when the Beast from the East hits Heathrow in this jolly documentary. Staff get a frosty reception from passengers whose flights are cancelled, while over in Arrivals, Border Force deals with a suspected people trafficker. VP The Secret Life of the Zoo Channel 4, 8.00pm It’s all about the boys tonight as we make our final visit to Chester Zoo. Giraffe Kidepo is transported to France to breed, but keepers are frustrated by Gary the caiman lizard, who’s proving a flop in the bedroom department. VP Secrets Of The Third Reich: The Nazi Gold Train Yesterday, 8.00pm Conspiracy theorists and treasure hunters will be hooked on this repeat of an investigation into a stash of plundered Nazi gold. In 2015 the gold, said to have been loaded onto a train and driven to the eastern Reich in 1944 but then lost to history, was claimed to have been located by two treasure hunters. Tonight’s pacy documentary follows their probe into the lost loot. VP The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs BBC One, 9.00pm; NI/Scotland, 10.45pm; Wales. 11.05pm Dr Chris van Tulleken returns with another two-parter questioning the British culture of pill-popping. His focus is children, and although the approach is light, the message is serious: we’re over-medicating our children. VP Love in the Countryside BBC Two, 9.00pm Rural romantics continue their search for love in this charming dating series. Pig farmer Wendy enjoys having two men vie for her affections, while farrier Mark hopes that his dates can overlook the fact that he uses his lounge as a storage shed. VP Big Sky, Big Dreams, Big Art: Made in the USA BBC Four, 9.00pm Art critic Waldemar Januszczak heads to the Wild West for the first episode of a new series examining how its dramatic landscape inspired early US painters. Januszczak is a knowledgeable guide as he pays tribute to the likes of artist Thomas Moran, an immigrant from Lancashire who painted Turner-esque landscapes, and explains how drip painter Jackson Pollock was influenced by Native American art. VP My Darling Clementine (1946, b/w) ★★★★★ Film4, 2.40pm John Ford’s wistful take on the story of Wyatt Earp is still the one against which all other versions of this western should be judged. Ford claimed to have known Earp, played here by Henry Fonda, and based the final shoot-out at the OK Corral on what he’d been told. But what stands out are the performances, the magnificent setting, and numerous inventive and exquisitely staged scenes. Face/Off (1997) ★★★★☆ Syfy, 10.00pm Nicolas Cage and John Travolta star opposite one another in more ways than one in this brilliantly silly thriller from all-action director John Woo (Hard Target; Broken Arrow). Travolta plays an FBI agent, Cage a criminal mastermind. Yet after a complex set-up and a bizarre surgical procedure, the two end up swapping faces before embarking on an incredibly confusing game of cat and mouse. Hummingbird (2013) ★★★☆☆ Channel 5, 11.00pm Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) writes and directs this offbeat tale of vigilante justice. Jason Statham is the ex-Special Forces soldier who, after finding himself homeless, is given the opportunity to deliver some tough justice and seizes it with both hands. While it may sound like a typical Statham film, there are plenty of twists and London’s underbelly is given a menacing edge thanks to some deft camera work. Thursday 24 May The Ship of Fools: Bosch’s painting from around 1500-1510 Great Art: The Curious World Of Hieronymus Bosch ITV, 10.45pm “Overwhelmingly powerful, sometimes bizarre, frightening and beautiful,” is how Royal Academy director Tim Marlow describes the work of late medieval painter Hieronymus Bosch, the subject of tonight’s slice of scholarly art history. As ever with this excellent series, a recent exhibition acts as an entry point for our understanding of the artist’s work. Here the setting has particular poignancy, with most of Bosch’s greatest pieces gathered together for the first time in 2016 at Noordbrabants Museum in Den Bosch, the artist’s hometown in the Netherlands. Over the course of the programme, a raft of experts explain how this devoutly religious, prosperous pillar of the community used common religious tropes as a springboard for vivid flights of magination. Bosch offset his moralistic scenes with hellish gangs of tortured figures and monstrous creatures, as vibrant and arresting as they are abhorrent. With so much detail to absorb, it’s an added bonus that the camera is allowed to linger over individual works, while leisurely explanations of what Bosch was trying to achieve accompany the images. TD Britain’s Best Home Cook BBC One, 8.00pm Our seven remaining amateur cooks tackle the venerable roast dinner tonight, with guinea fowl, spiced roast chicken and roasted ox heart all on the menu. In the next round a dish using either cauliflower or crab as the key ingredient is required. TD Humans Channel 4, 9.00pm The third series of this stylish, psychologically acute sci-fi drama continues. Rebel Synth Agnes (Holly Earl) begins a campaign against humans, while Laura (Katherine Parkinson) turns to behavioural scientist Neil Sommer (Mark Bonnar) for help. TD Million Pound Menu BBC Two, 9.00pm A trio of friends running a Cuban street-food stall and a chirpy former waitress peddling vegan junk food are given pop-up restaurant space tonight, both hoping to bag big bucks from a raft of industry investors. A fraught lunch service puts both brands to the test. First Dates’ maître d’ Fred Sireix hosts. TD The Trouble With M&S Channel 5, 9.00pm With tales of Marks & Spencer’s decline long touted, Fiona Phillips takes a look at the problems besetting the high-street stalwart. She speaks to former staff and customers about how the store can restore its status, and also meets former boss Stuart Rose. TD Missions BBC Four, 9.00pm and 9.20pm Tonight sees another double bill of the absorbing French sci-fi series about a fraught mission to Mars. Last week the crew rescued a man claiming to be Soviet cosmonaut Vladimir Komarov. Knowing the pilot’s history, however, the crew now debate whether their find is using a false identity. TD Spring Broke PBS America, 9.00pm This lively documentary takes a look at the American phenomenon of Spring Break, when hoards of teenagers head for warmer climes, in particular Daytona in Florida, to party hard. TD Urban Myths: Public enemy Sky Arts, 9.00pm This episode of the delightful drama comedy series is set in Sheffield, for a meeting between New York rappers Public Enemy and a local taxi driver. Philip Glenister plays the cabbie and super-fan charged with delivering the band to a gig when their tour bus disappears. TD A Good Year (2006) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 6.45pm Reuniting Ridley Scott and Russell Crowe for the first time since the Oscar-winning epic Gladiator, this syrupy but visually ravishing romcom is based on the novel by Peter Mayle. It follows the travails of a city trader who inherits a vineyard in Provence. It’s predictable stuff, but Marion Cotillard (as a local café owner) is, as ever, very watchable. Tom Hollander, Albert Finney and Freddie Highmore co-star. Get Carter (1971) ★★★★★ TCM, 9.00pm Revenge thriller starring a superb Michael Caine as Jack Carter, a London mobster who moves back to the North East to attend his brother’s funeral. Suspecting foul play, he discovers a trail of misdeed leading to a local loan-thug, played with menace by Terence Rigby. Brutal and gripping (and adapted from the 1969 novel Jack’s Return Home), this was one of the last great British films before the industry’s Seventies slump. Green Zone (2010) ★★★☆☆ ITV4, 11.15pm Bourne director Paul Greengrass is reunited with thoughtful hunk Matt Damon for this thriller set during the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. Damon plays an army officer, out of breath in a flak jacket, who is on the hunt for weapons of mass destruction. He begins to suspect that there might not be any, and that his shady superiors (led by Greg Kinnear) might already know it. It’s a compelling blend of fact and fiction. Friday 25 May War zone: Rene Silva and Ade Adepitan Unreported World Channel 4, 7.30pm The last episode in what has been a typically excellent series of Unreported World sees Ade Adepitan heading to Rio de Janeiro’s favelas. “I never expected to wear a flak jacket in a city… I always thought it would be in a war zone,” he admits. Of course, Rio’s favelas are a war zone in their own way, as recent events – including the assassination of local politician Marielle Franco – make devastatingly clear. Adepitan’s focus is with the young reporters of Voz Das Comunidades, a local newspaper run entirely from within the favela, whose founder Rene Silva, now 24, started at the age of 11 “to report the stories not covered by the media”. Today, Voz, which covers everything from the terrible living conditions in the favela to the increased violence between criminal gangs and police, is a vital media presence. It’s not all smooth sailing, however. While the team are determined to cover the detrimental effects that the gangs and police have on their community, they are also wary of reporting on the actual crimes, with Silva admitting: “I’ve never been stopped [by gangs] from writing about it but I prefer not to because it’s a great risk to myself and my family.” SH Wild Escapes BBC Two, 7.00pm How do you make a holiday programme stand out? The answer, according to Anita Rani and JJ Chalmers, is by heading off the beaten track. First up: Italy’s Dolomite Mountains, where the pair are buried in hay, trek through peaks and learn a very peculiar dance. SH The Biggest Weekend BBC Four, from 7.30pm Lauren Laverne and Colin Murray guide audiences through the opening night of BBC Music’s Biggest Weekend festival, with tonight’s action coming from the Titanic Slipways in Belfast. The Manic Street Preachers, Beck and Orbital are among the performers. SH The Bridge BBC Two, 9.00pm She’s taken on criminals, murderers and even her own mother but tonight the indominable Saga Noren faces something much worse: therapy. The result is a blackly comic scene in which our heroine explains just why she might be suffering from PTSD. Elsewhere, Henrik (Thure Lindhardt) continues to dig into Red October. SH The Story of Cliff Richard Channel 5, 9.00pm A straight-forward profile of the singer from his early days as a cinema heartthrob to the sing-along at Wimbledon. It’s followed by a repeat of An Audience with Cliff Richard, in which the singer performs his greatest hits in front of a celebrity audience. SH Home from Home BBC One, 9.30pm The comedy comes to a suitably sweet-natured conclusion with an episode themed around new love and old, as Robert (Adam James) and Penny (Emilia Fox) put their house on the market – much to Neil’s (Johnny Vegas) initial joy. SH Hip Hop Evolution Sky Arts, 9.00pm A new series tracing the rise of hip hop from its early days in the Bronx to its current global dominance. Episode one takes us back to Seventies New York. SH Generation Grime Sky Arts, 10.00pm This enthralling documentary covers everything you need to know about grime, from raw beginnings to chart-topping omnipresence. Everyone from Wiley to Skepta contributes, and there are some fascinating insights, chief among them the notion that the genre’s popularity comes from the musicians’ refusal to bow to anyone, including their famous US rap counterparts. SH Funeral in Berlin (1966) ★★★☆☆ Film4, 1.15pm Michael Caine stars in this spy film as Harry Palmer, who’s sent to Berlin to help smuggle a Soviet intelligence officer out of East Germany. When he arrives, it becomes clear that the Communist agent may not be quite so set on defecting. It’s the second of three Harry Palmer films from the Sixties that were based on novels of Len Deighton. Caine shines in the role as an anti-Bond with a sharp tongue. War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) ★★★★☆ Sky Cinema Premiere, 8.00pm Following Rise of (2011) and Dawn of (2014), the series moved to War for, which was galling for those of us who’d hoped for Breakfast at. This mesmerising new chapter modulates between revenge western and historical epic via Vietnam meltdown as Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his apes are forced into conflict with an army of humans led by a ruthless Woody Harrelson. Lucky Them (2013) ★★★☆☆ BBC One, 12.25am; N Ireland, 12.55am Superb performances from Toni Collette and Thomas Haden Church elevate this flimsy comedy-drama into something fleetingly brilliant. Collette’s Ellie is a fortysomething music journalist on the verge of a serious crisis, when, accompanied by an eccentric amateur film-maker (Church), she begins to search for her ex-boyfriend, a missing, presumed dead, rock star. Television previewers Toby Dantzic, Sarah Hughes, Gerard O'Donovan, Vicki Power and Gabriel Tate
Varias estrellas del fútbol español que juegan en LaLiga, la Serie A o la Premier League no estarán en Rusia 2018.
Así es el equipo que no lleva España al Mundial
Varias estrellas del fútbol español que juegan en LaLiga, la Serie A o la Premier League no estarán en Rusia 2018.
Varias estrellas del fútbol español que juegan en LaLiga, la Serie A o la Premier League no estarán en Rusia 2018.
Así es el equipo que no lleva España al Mundial
Varias estrellas del fútbol español que juegan en LaLiga, la Serie A o la Premier League no estarán en Rusia 2018.
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Where will Manuel Pellegrini rank among Premier League's top earning bosses when he joins West Ham?
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Managerial mayhem: Why half of last season's Premier League are in flux and what will be decided this week
Half of last season's Premier League are in a state of managerial upheaval, symptomatic of a season that saw only a few clubs avoid the spectre of discontent. This summer could see a remarkable number of entrances and exits, with up to 10 teams unsure of who their manager will be come August. Arsenal, and possibly Chelsea, will try and muster a stronger challenge with a new man at the helm, while West Ham and Everton are looking to escape the mid-table morass and ingratiate themselves with unhappy supporters. Stoke and Swansea parted ways with their managers after relegation, while some clubs are hoping to ward off interest from bigger clubs in their over-achieving coaches. Here are the 10 cases that could reach a conclusion soon. Imminent arrivals Mikel Arteta (Arsenal) Arsenal promised an appointment before the start of the World Cup and they appear ready to honour their word. Former captain Mikel Arteta is close to agreeing a deal that will see him succeed Arsène Wenger in a head coach role. Despite links with high-profile managers such as Luis Enrique and Massimiliano Allegri, Arsenal have opted for a coach they believe will fit into the club's new structure and balance of power. Mikel Arteta Arsenal manager: The case for and against Following a cull of Wenger's backroom staff, all that remains is for Arteta to finalise who he wishes to assist him. Steve Bould has been offered a position by Arsenal but could be reluctant to work under the younger Arteta, while there have been whispers of a role for fellow Basque playmaker and close friend Xabi Alonso. Manuel Pellegrini (West Ham) Former Real Madrid manager Manuel Pellegrini is in London for talks with West Ham, as the club look to re-energise a beleaguered fan-base. David Moyes brought discipline and a work ethic to a squad in dire need of organisation, but Premier League teams need to aspire to more than survival to keep punters interested. Pellegrini and life in London could be twin attractions to a higher standard of player, and the coach known as 'The Engineer' has a reputation for cultivating expressive, attacking football. Pellegrini won a league title and two League Cups at Manchester City and took Malaga to within seconds of a Champions League semi-final in 2013. Manuel Pellegrini guided Manchester City to a second Premier League Credit: Getty Images Marco Silva (Everton) The man Everton wanted last autumn before they settled for Sam Allardyce, Marco Silva remains the frontrunner for the job. Reports suggest he is 'edging closer' with talks scheduled for this week, although his former club Watford are still pursuing a complaint for an alleged illegal approach for Silva. Everton could have to agree a compensation package, even though Silva is currently unemployed. A manager who has been greeted with scepticism in England, Silva will be under pressure from the off should he arrive at Goodison Park. Possible departures Antonio Conte (Chelsea) Asituation that has been brewing since Conte sent that text message to Diego Costa and was left unsatisfied by Chelsea's summer transfer dealings. The season finished with an FA Cup triumph, Conte's second major trophy with England, and despite lingering ill-feeling Chelsea reached the end of the campaign without truly running off the rails. Revealed: The inside story of how Antonio Conte's reign at Chelsea turned sour The Italian looks short of allies within the club's hierarchy however, and repeated in his post-match press conference at Wembley that he has no intention of changing. Conte's reputation as a coach has not been damaged, and he would be a leading contender for most of European football's plum jobs. He will not be scared of moving on, and Chelsea are certainly not scared of managerial change. It all points in one direction. Claude Puel (Leicester) After a promising start that left many feeling Puel had been unfairly treated by Southampton, things fizzled out at Leicester in familiar fashion. The usually cycle - new manager, pick-up in form, consolidation, eventual stagnation - used to take a year or two, but expires within a few months in today's Premier League. Leicester's reality was warped by their 2015-16 title-winning season, and they have not established reasonable expectations and targets since. Their players seem bored by Puel, and his desire to slow-down Leicester's build-up play through shorter passes always seems an awkward fit (even though they will have to evolve eventually). Another club that could face an identity crisis. Claude Puel's Leicester limped towards the finish line last season Credit: Getty Images Vacancies Swansea City Carlos Carvalhal ran out of analogies and ideas, and left Swansea last week following relegation to the Championship. Geeing up a group of players with positivity can yield short-term rewards but also diminishing returns. Swansea will struggle to attract a better technical coach than Paul Clement, even if elements of his man management were found wanting, so face an uncertain future. Do they appoint a promotion specialist with knowledge of the division or return to the philosophy that served them well under Roberto Martinez, Paulo Sousa and Brendan Rodgers? Jaap Stam, Chris Coleman and Ostersunds manager Graham Potter have been linked. Premier League club-by-club review Stoke City Stoke seem to want a British manager to guide them back to the top-flight with Gary Rowett the red-hot favourite to replace Paul Lambert. Former player Steve Bould could also be available if he decides to decline Arsenal's offer to stay under the new regime, but he would be a gamble. Like Swansea, a club that seems to have lost an 'identity'. The early indications are they wish to recapture the aggression and pugnacity of the Tony Pulis-era. Unresolved futures Mark Hughes (Southampton) Southampton are expected to name Mark Hughes are their permanent manager this week. Hughes signed a short-term contract at St Mary's but will be rewarded with a longer deal after guiding them to Premier League safety. Now Southampton must focus on ensuring they do not leave themselves in such a perilous position again, starting with sound recruitment this summer. Hughes' spending and transfer record at Stoke and Queens Park Rangers was chequered at best. Is Rafael Benitez on collision course with Mike Ashley? Credit: Getty Images Rafael Benitez (Newcastle) 'Rafa' would like to stay and Newcastle would love to keep him, so why the nagging doubt that this could end in tears? It all comes down to whether owner Mike Ashley, who is still looking to sell the club, backs Benitez in the transfer market to build a squad that can establish itself in the top-half. Benitez is well aware that he has suitors, and holds all the aces in the battle of wills between manager and owner. A new contract remains unsigned. David Wagner (Huddersfield) Now the sixth-longest serving boss in the Premier League, David Wagner will likely be at Huddersfield next season but they would be wise to reward his fine work with a new contract. Wagner has attracted admiring glances from clubs such as Everton, and there was even a link to the Chelsea job earlier this year.
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
Eden Hazard hints at Chelsea stay with Premier League title warning for Manchester City
FILE - In this Sunday, May 24, 2015 file photo Chelsea's Russian billionaire owner Roman Abramovich, center, applauds after Chelsea were presented with the Premier League trophy after the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
FILE - In this Sunday, May 24, 2015 file photo Chelsea's Russian billionaire owner Roman Abramovich, center, applauds after Chelsea were presented with the Premier League trophy after the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
FILE - In this Sunday, May 24, 2015 file photo Chelsea's Russian billionaire owner Roman Abramovich, center, applauds after Chelsea were presented with the Premier League trophy after the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
<p> FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File) </p>
Russian billionaire Abramovich runs into UK visa issues

FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)
<p> FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)</p>
Russian billionaire Abramovich runs into UK visa issues

FILE - In this file photo dated Saturday, Dec. 19, 2015, Chelsea soccer club owner Roman Abramovich sits in his box before the English Premier League soccer match between Chelsea and Sunderland at Stamford Bridge stadium in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League Reuters / Hannah McKay Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or &quot;live&quot; services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League
Britain Football Soccer - Chelsea v Sunderland - Premier League - Stamford Bridge - 21/5/17 Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich applauds fans after winning the Premier League Reuters / Hannah McKay Livepic EDITORIAL USE ONLY. No use with unauthorized audio, video, data, fixture lists, club/league logos or "live" services. Online in-match use limited to 45 images, no video emulation. No use in betting, games or single club/league/player publications. Please contact your account representative for further details.
The chairman of English Premier League champions Manchester City is confident the club will reach even greater heights under the &quot;relentless&quot; Pep Guardiola despite having just completed a record-breaking season.
Premier League: Manchester City eye era of dominance under 'relentless' Pep Guardiola, says club chairman
The chairman of English Premier League champions Manchester City is confident the club will reach even greater heights under the "relentless" Pep Guardiola despite having just completed a record-breaking season.
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here&#39;s how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
How it all went wrong for Antonio Conte at Chelsea
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here's how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here&#39;s how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
How it all went wrong for Antonio Conte at Chelsea
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here's how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here&#39;s how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
How it all went wrong for Antonio Conte at Chelsea
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here's how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here's how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
How it all went wrong for Antonio Conte at Chelsea
A Premier League title and an FA Cup in his first two seasons with Chelsea but Antonio Conte is on borrowed time. Here's how it all went wrong for the former Juventus boss.
The Slovakian keeper has impressed during his loan spell with Rafa Benitez&#39;s side and has relished the chance to play in the Premier League
Dubravka hoping for permanent Newcastle deal
The Slovakian keeper has impressed during his loan spell with Rafa Benitez's side and has relished the chance to play in the Premier League
Chelsea captain Gary Cahill has called for &quot;the uncertainty to be put to bed&quot; over the future of Antonio Conte, with the Italian widely expected to be on his way out of the club.
Premier League: Chelsea captain Gary Cahill urges clarity over Antonio Conte's future with club
Chelsea captain Gary Cahill has called for "the uncertainty to be put to bed" over the future of Antonio Conte, with the Italian widely expected to be on his way out of the club.
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
IPL 2018: Full Schedule, Fixtures and Venues of IPL Playoffs
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
IPL 2018: Full Schedule, Fixtures and Venues of IPL Playoffs
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
IPL 2018: Full Schedule, Fixtures and Venues of IPL Playoffs
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
IPL 2018: Full Schedule, Fixtures and Venues of IPL Playoffs
The long grueling league edition of the Indian Premier League is finally over and now four teams will play for the ultimate prize. The
​Former ​Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini is set to hold talks with ​West Ham on Monday, with ​his appointment as Hammers boss expected to be announced this week. ​The Mail reports that Pellegrini has emerged as the London club&#39;s favoured target to replace the recently departed David Moyes, and the Chilean coach is thought to be considering the offer of a three-year contract with the ​Premier League side. The 64-year-old manager has reportedly been targeting a return to European...
West Ham to Meet With Manuel Pellegrini Ahead of Expected Appointment as Hammers Boss
​Former ​Manchester City manager Manuel Pellegrini is set to hold talks with ​West Ham on Monday, with ​his appointment as Hammers boss expected to be announced this week. ​The Mail reports that Pellegrini has emerged as the London club's favoured target to replace the recently departed David Moyes, and the Chilean coach is thought to be considering the offer of a three-year contract with the ​Premier League side. The 64-year-old manager has reportedly been targeting a return to European...

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