Futbol inglés

Las mejores imágenes de la Premier League

Sergio Aguero a été élu meilleur joueur du mois de janvier en Premier League.
Foot - ANG - Sergio Aguero, le meilleur de la Premier League en janvier
Sergio Aguero a été élu meilleur joueur du mois de janvier en Premier League.
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
Martin Guptill becomes highest run-getter in T20I history
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
Martin Guptill becomes highest run-getter in T20I history
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
Martin Guptill becomes highest run-getter in T20I history
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
Martin Guptill becomes highest run-getter in T20I history
The man who went unsold in the Indian Premier League auction, Martin Guptill smashed a sublime 105 off just 54 deliveries, scoring a century off 49 deliveries, one less than the previous Kiwi record held by former captain Brendon McCullum.
Abwehrspieler John Terry von Aston Villa soll sich mit einer Trainerrolle beim FC Chelsea zur kommenden Saison befassen. Das berichtet der Mirror.
Premier League: John Terry vor Trainer-Engagement beim FC Chelsea?
Abwehrspieler John Terry von Aston Villa soll sich mit einer Trainerrolle beim FC Chelsea zur kommenden Saison befassen. Das berichtet der Mirror.
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
<p>Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?</p>
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?

Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?

Four of England&#39;s top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
<p>Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?</p>
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?

Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?

Four of England&#39;s top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Friday pressure briefing: Which Premier League favourites will handle the FA Cup tension?
Four of England's top six clubs are in FA cup action this weekend, all carrying the weight of expectation amid a frenzied part of the calendar
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC&#39;s John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry&#39;s goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. &quot;The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic&#39;s warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis&#39;s memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis&#39;s passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic&#39;s Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry&#39;s 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…&quot;
'Coventry fans say it was the best day of their lives': Steve Ogrizovic on why 1987 FA Cup win has lost none of its lustre
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC's John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry's goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. "The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic's warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis's memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis's passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic's Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry's 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…"
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC&#39;s John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry&#39;s goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. &quot;The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic&#39;s warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis&#39;s memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis&#39;s passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic&#39;s Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry&#39;s 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…&quot;
'Coventry fans say it was the best day of their lives': Steve Ogrizovic on why 1987 FA Cup win has lost none of its lustre
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC's John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry's goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. "The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic's warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis's memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis's passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic's Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry's 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…"
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC&#39;s John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry&#39;s goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. &quot;The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic&#39;s warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis&#39;s memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis&#39;s passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic&#39;s Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry&#39;s 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…&quot;
'Coventry fans say it was the best day of their lives': Steve Ogrizovic on why 1987 FA Cup win has lost none of its lustre
Even now, nearly 31 years on from that scorching Wembley afternoon, Steve Ogrizovic cannot escape Coventry City’s famous day in the sun. “Wherever I go, there will be somebody mentioning the 1987 FA Cup final against Spurs,” he says, smiling. “People will say it was the best day of their lives. I always ask them ‘what about the day you got married, or the day when your kids were born’ but they just want to talk about the final. The fans who went to Wembley have dined out on it ever since. Not a day goes by without it being mentioned. “If you talk to the staff here, they’ll also say I mention it every day – but I can assure you it’s not true…” With Ogrizovic in goal, Coventry secured one of the most memorable victories in the cup’s long history when they defeated Tottenham Hotspur 3-2. Spurs - runaway favourites, despite only finishing eight points ahead of Coventry in the First Division that season - led twice but City, playing in their first major final, were in no mood to lie down. Coventry striker Keith Houchen dives to head past Spurs goalkeeper Ray Clemence - as Chris Hughton, now Brighton manager, watches on Credit: Hulton Archive After Keith Houchen’s spectacular airborne header took the game into extra time, the defining moment came in the 95th minute, when the unfortunate Gary Mabbutt diverted Lloyd McGrath’s cross over his own goalkeeper Ray Clemence for the winner. The moment was immortalised by the creation of Coventry’s famous fanzine ‘Gary Mabbutt’s Knee’, while the BBC's John Motson described the game as “the finest final I’ve had the pleasure of commentating on”. For Ogrizovic, now Coventry's goalkeeping coach, the memories remain vivid. “It was the game which really put Coventry on the map, in terms of being the first major trophy the club had ever won,” he recalls. “The great thing about that game is not only Coventry winning but how it’s remembered as an entertaining, exciting final. "The finals weren’t always that entertaining in those days, which people forget. There certainly weren’t too many with five goals. It really doesn’t feel so long ago.” Yet Ogrizovic's warm memories of that May day are also tinged with sadness. Leading the line for City for the whole 120 minutes at Wembley was Cyrille Regis, whose tragic death at the age of 59 last month left the English game - and the west midlands, in particular - in mourning. “Football is the all poorer without Cyrille in it,” Ogrizovic says. “Everybody in the football world was absolutely devastated, not just in Coventry, West Brom or Wolverhampton, but throughout the country. “He was such a brilliant guy, not just a fantastic footballer and team-mate but a fantastic friend. You’ve seen that with the eulogies and testimonials that people have recounted since. He was such a loss.” Steve Ogrizovic at Cyrille Regis's memorial service at the Hawthorns Credit: West Bromwich Albion FC Regis's passing should ensure even more support from the neutrals tomorrow, when Coventry attempt to revive their FA Cup pedigree with a visit to Premier League Brighton. In an ironic twist, the man in charge of Brighton - Chris Hughton - played in the Spurs defence in that Wembley classic. Coventry will be backed by nearly 5,000 fans at the Amex Stadium, and there is a sense of the feel-good factor returning to a fanbase that has spent much of the last decade fighting the ownership of hedge fund Sisu - a period which has seen them temporarily abandon their Ricoh Arena home, plunge into the bottom tier of English football and work their way through nine managers. Throughout this period, Ogrizovic, now 60, has been a reassuringly constant presence. He made 601 appearances for the club after joining in 1984, and has held a variety of roles - including caretaker manager - since his retirement in 2000. For many fans, he represents hope that better times will be around the corner. Steve Ogrizovic celebrates the Cup triumph in 1987 Credit: David Cannon Collection “I’ve been very fortunate. My first contract was for three years and never in my wildest dreams did I envisage being here for so long,” he says. “I’ve been academy manager, under-18s coach, caretaker manager and now goalkeeping coach. The best part of football is playing, the second best is coaching and being a part of the set-up. “Although we’re all getting older, football keeps you young. I just love coming in every day. It’s been quite a journey but such an enjoyable one.” A second Premier League scalp of the season - City defeated Stoke in round three, leading to the sacking of Mark Hughes - would be another memorable instalment of Ogrizovic's Coventry story, and he is not discounting an upset. Cup kings | What happened to Coventry's 1987 heroes? “The form book says Brighton on their home soil should win the game comfortably but things don’t always pan out that way,” he says. “Players are quite bright now, they know what it takes for a cup upset. The gulf between Premier League and the old Fourth Division is enormous but it all goes out the window in the cup – as we proved against Stoke. “I’ve been on both ends of it – I’ve been fortunate enough to win it and unfortunate enough to be on the end of a giant-killing against Sutton United [two years later] The cup can throw up some strange things…"
<enter> during the Premier League match between Leicester City and Swansea City at The King Power Stadium on February 3, 2018 in Leicester, England.</enter>
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during the Premier League match between Leicester City and Swansea City at The King Power Stadium on February 3, 2018 in Leicester, England.
The dominance of the Premier League&#39;s manager of the month prize by Manchester City&#39;s Pep Guardiola has ended after four successive wins.
Howe ends Guardiola's manager of the month streak
The dominance of the Premier League's manager of the month prize by Manchester City's Pep Guardiola has ended after four successive wins.
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
Best fantasy football strikers in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season into its second half, Goal looks at the top striker options, as well as considering a number of potential bargain buys
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
<p>Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season</p>
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season

Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season

With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
<p>Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season</p>
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season

Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season

With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Best fantasy football midfielders in the Premier League 2017-18 season
With the season past the half-way mark, Goal takes a look at the best midfielders available to virtual coaches, including some bargain buys
Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp is relishing the chance to select his best players for every match as the club boast a fully-fit squad ahead of crucial fixtures in the Premier League and Champions League.
Liverpool's Jurgen Klopp Welcomes Selection Woes With Full Squad
Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp is relishing the chance to select his best players for every match as the club boast a fully-fit squad ahead of crucial fixtures in the Premier League and Champions League.
Just one dream job wasnt enough for these 41 multitaskers, who have been both players and full-time managers in the Premier League
Quiz! Can you name the 41 people to have played AND managed in the Premier League?
Just one dream job wasnt enough for these 41 multitaskers, who have been both players and full-time managers in the Premier League
Eddie Howe a été nommé meilleur entraîneur de Premier League au mois de janvier.
Foot - ANG - Eddie Howe, meilleur coach de janvier en Premier League
Eddie Howe a été nommé meilleur entraîneur de Premier League au mois de janvier.
Pothole puddles splash red-ochre streaks onto the black paintwork of the car as we bounce up the hill and recognition stirs. There is the driveway I walked up 23 years ago. And look. At the gates, guarding the memory of his old boss, sits the gardener. Frank Elliot Apaw is my name, he tells me. Frank Elliot Apaw, I say almost in unison. I remember him. I came to Ghana in 1994 for a BBC report about a man with a double life. The film opened with a distinguished looking chap reading The Daily Telegraph in the orchard of his Shropshire garden. “Jimmy Moxon OBE, the quintessential English gentleman,” the voice of a younger me explained. “Public school, Cambridge, His Majesty’s Colonial Service.” “But there is another side to this pillar of the local parish,” my commentary teased. “Married to at least six different women, he worships the fairies and, oh, he’s an African chief.” That was the story. The white Englishman who spent half the year as a retired civil servant in his thatched cottage near Ludlow and the other half as a “fully gazetted” Akan chieftain in the hills of Aburi in southern Ghana. Frank and I watch my old video together at the gates of Chief Nana Kofi Obonyaa’s residence and he beams at the pictures of Jimmy dancing on his palanquin. The “fully gazetted” Akan chieftain Credit: getty “All around here was full, hundreds of people, chiefs and politicians, the police and fire service,” Frank recalls as we walk through the ruins of the old chief’s house. “It was a massive funeral. People loved him.” Jimmy died in 1999 and a shrine has been placed in the shadow of the silk cotton tree that gave him his tribal name. He had won the country’s adoration as a British civil servant during the Second World War when he personally visited farmers, encouraging them to switch from cocoa to food crops, a decision that saved countless lives. Beneath a bronze head, a simple plaque reads “a loyal son of the empire and a true son of Ghana”. Jimmy Moxon won the country&#39;s admiration even as it won its independence I have returned in search of some winter sun. But, of course, my mind turns to the charming Englishman whose career serenely bridged the years from old colony to new nation, from Gold Coast to independent Ghana. The tour buses are filled with people exploring the gaps in their family stories. Increasingly, they are black Americans tracing the journey of their enslaved ancestors in reverse; across the vast ocean, back through the terrifying “room of no return”, past the haunting dungeons and out into the sunlit forests of mahogany and ebony, the fields of pineapple and cocoa, and the plains of acacia and wild grasses. The slave trade branded this new nation just as the merchants branded their human cargo, but Ghana is gathering the confidence to show its scars to the world. The white colonial forts dotted along the coast, now World Heritage Sites, are each stained with the shame of genocide. Peeling paint in the condemned cell at Elmina Castle reveals the scratched markings of slaves counting down the days until they finally succumbed to starvation. White colonial forts are dotted along the coast Credit: DEMERZEL21 - STOCK.ADOBE.COM Some three hours from central Accra, in the silence of the female dungeon at Elmina, people have placed wreaths. One names a woman who somehow survived hell to complete the journey to the plantations of the new world and to pass on her DNA. Her descendants have returned to honour her and remember the millions who perished. The legacy of colonialism is soaked into the patina of this land. The missionaries who came from Britain to save African souls have turned Ghana into a country that fervently believes in miracles. Businesses proclaim their faith: “By His Grace Building Materials”, “Merciful Wigs”, “God Is in Control Windscreens”, “Amazing Love Aluminium”. Evangelical singing drifts on the wind past smiling billboards promising a better tomorrow. A local woman in Accra Credit: GETTY “Forward Ever, Backward Never” was the battle cry of Ghana’s first President Kwame Nkrumah, his statue in Accra pointing at the untapped potential. The white masters used to play polo on the exact spot where his memorial now stands and where independence from British rule was declared in 1957. Today, neatly symbolising Ghana’s journey, Accra Polo Club has moved closer to the international airport: rich African hedge-fund managers rubbing shoulders with European ex-pats. The club archives include photographs of all-white teams posing with pith helmets and neat moustaches, but on the field and in the bar, Ghana’s new elite cuts across any racial divide. Boats outside one of Ghana&#39;s Unesco-recognised forts Credit: GETTY “I suppose I am most proud of the fact that I have not been controversial,” Jimmy Moxon had told me in his garden in the Aburi hills in 1994 when I asked how he had managed to survive the turmoil that surrounded independence. His diplomatic skills served Jimmy well, but also stand as a metaphor for the way Ghana has navigated its post-colonial path. There have been obstacles, and challenges remain, but optimism and decency seem to flourish in the tropical climate. “Just come home,” says Catherine Afeku, Ghana’s tourism minister. “We are family.” She has ambitious plans to transform the country’s tourist industry, to encourage the British to see it as a holiday destination. She imagines charter planes, buzzing south over the Sahara, filled with tourists from the UK, many with ancestral links but also those who fancy an African adventure in a land where the language is familiar, the clocks won’t keep you awake at night and the welcome is warm. Ghana hopes more Britons will consider an adventure there Credit: GETTY “When you look at the European market, we are truly the centre of the world,” Mrs Afeku tells me with a smile, pointing out that the Greenwich Meridian meets the equator closest to Ghana. There is an irony in this. The meridian was first devised by an 18th-century economist who actively supported the expansion of the slave trade. The Greenwich Meridian, a century later, symbolised the centrality of British imperial power. At a glance | The destinations that use GMT But such observations tend to be met with a shrug in modern Ghana. “We share a common heritage. After two hundred years you took a break and now we would like you to come back,” the minister says with a laugh, “for short stays this time.” The idea of a weekend break to the golden beaches on the Gulf of Guinea, or the safari lodges in the northern region, might seem fanciful right now. Visa requirements, yellow-fever inoculations, anti-malaria pills: the white man’s grave of West Africa can seem a daunting destination. But the country’s pro-business government wants to change that perception, stressing how Ghana has had 25 years of stable democracy and is ready to welcome the world through its doors. Sandy beaches are one of the country&#39;s draws Credit: GETTY The expansion of Accra airport means five million passengers can soon be accommodated each year. The city’s Ambassador Hotel, a gift from the United Kingdom to Ghana at independence in 1957, has been rebuilt as a five-star Mövenpick. An impressive Kempinski hotel has recently opened next to a luxury shopping mall. Walk past the diplomatic limos and saluting chauffeurs into the elegant lobby of the Kempinski and you will hear the unmistakable murmur of deal making. “A lot of British ex-pats are coming back to invest in tourism,” says Manish Nambiar, the hotel’s urbane general manager. “We see huge opportunity.” At a glance | Overseas arrivals in Ghana The hotel has a refreshing rooftop swimming pool and will soon open a glamorous spa but, for the moment, the sunloungers are mostly occupied by eager business executives and the aircrew who got them here. Ghana clearly has huge potential as a holiday destination, although the infrastructure is not yet fully in place. The main road west from Accra is a stationary wall of vehicles much of the time. But with customary resourcefulness, the locals turn the traffic jam into a commercial opportunity. Hawkers weave between the cars with an extraordinary array of products balanced on their heads: cassava, pineapples, eggs, giant snails, board games, pig genitalia, clocks – whatever you might need, it will find you on the Cape Coast Road. Could the country become a new hub for winter sun holidays? Credit: GETTY There is a striking creativity about Ghana: in art, music, fashion and food, world-class talent is emerging from often stunning poverty. On the beach at Jamestown, in the shadow of the old Accra slave dungeons, a shanty town of slums grimly defines the challenge. Yet, next door on the sand, there is an inspiring charity school where some of the very poorest street children can get an education. Across the road, is a grassless football pitch where some of Ghana’s best players honed their skills. Slave masters once traded their human wares here; now Premier League scouts come with their chequebooks. There is a striking creativity in art, music, fashion and food Credit: getty Roads are being improved, tourist attractions opening on the shore line, in the jungle and across the savannah. Ghana is turning a new corner on its journey and travelling without the baggage of post-colonial resentment. Quite the opposite. There is a remarkable generosity of spirit here. 23 African adventures you must have in your lifetime Standing on the veranda of what was once Jimmy’s house, I look out on the country he loved and which so loved him, to Frank’s garden where he and I gave libations to the spirits and he tried to persuade me that southern Ghana was not that different to Shropshire. Chief Nana Kofi Obonyaa would have approved of what this country is trying to do. Mark Easton is the Home Editor for BBC News How to visit Ghana British Airways (ba.com) offers direct flights from London to Accra from £503 return in March. The Kempinski Gold Coast City Hotel (kempinski.com) has a weekend rate of $250 (£180) for two sharing, and offers discounts for longer stays. Operators offering longer itineraries to Ghana and West Africa include overland specialists Dragoman (dragoman.com), luxury and tailor-made specialists Cox & Kings (coxandkings.co.uk) and Accra-based Ashanti African Tours (ashantiafricantours.com). For more information on tourism to Ghana, see touringghana.com and ghana.travel.
The curious story of a retired civil servant from Ludlow who became an African chief
Pothole puddles splash red-ochre streaks onto the black paintwork of the car as we bounce up the hill and recognition stirs. There is the driveway I walked up 23 years ago. And look. At the gates, guarding the memory of his old boss, sits the gardener. Frank Elliot Apaw is my name, he tells me. Frank Elliot Apaw, I say almost in unison. I remember him. I came to Ghana in 1994 for a BBC report about a man with a double life. The film opened with a distinguished looking chap reading The Daily Telegraph in the orchard of his Shropshire garden. “Jimmy Moxon OBE, the quintessential English gentleman,” the voice of a younger me explained. “Public school, Cambridge, His Majesty’s Colonial Service.” “But there is another side to this pillar of the local parish,” my commentary teased. “Married to at least six different women, he worships the fairies and, oh, he’s an African chief.” That was the story. The white Englishman who spent half the year as a retired civil servant in his thatched cottage near Ludlow and the other half as a “fully gazetted” Akan chieftain in the hills of Aburi in southern Ghana. Frank and I watch my old video together at the gates of Chief Nana Kofi Obonyaa’s residence and he beams at the pictures of Jimmy dancing on his palanquin. The “fully gazetted” Akan chieftain Credit: getty “All around here was full, hundreds of people, chiefs and politicians, the police and fire service,” Frank recalls as we walk through the ruins of the old chief’s house. “It was a massive funeral. People loved him.” Jimmy died in 1999 and a shrine has been placed in the shadow of the silk cotton tree that gave him his tribal name. He had won the country’s adoration as a British civil servant during the Second World War when he personally visited farmers, encouraging them to switch from cocoa to food crops, a decision that saved countless lives. Beneath a bronze head, a simple plaque reads “a loyal son of the empire and a true son of Ghana”. Jimmy Moxon won the country's admiration even as it won its independence I have returned in search of some winter sun. But, of course, my mind turns to the charming Englishman whose career serenely bridged the years from old colony to new nation, from Gold Coast to independent Ghana. The tour buses are filled with people exploring the gaps in their family stories. Increasingly, they are black Americans tracing the journey of their enslaved ancestors in reverse; across the vast ocean, back through the terrifying “room of no return”, past the haunting dungeons and out into the sunlit forests of mahogany and ebony, the fields of pineapple and cocoa, and the plains of acacia and wild grasses. The slave trade branded this new nation just as the merchants branded their human cargo, but Ghana is gathering the confidence to show its scars to the world. The white colonial forts dotted along the coast, now World Heritage Sites, are each stained with the shame of genocide. Peeling paint in the condemned cell at Elmina Castle reveals the scratched markings of slaves counting down the days until they finally succumbed to starvation. White colonial forts are dotted along the coast Credit: DEMERZEL21 - STOCK.ADOBE.COM Some three hours from central Accra, in the silence of the female dungeon at Elmina, people have placed wreaths. One names a woman who somehow survived hell to complete the journey to the plantations of the new world and to pass on her DNA. Her descendants have returned to honour her and remember the millions who perished. The legacy of colonialism is soaked into the patina of this land. The missionaries who came from Britain to save African souls have turned Ghana into a country that fervently believes in miracles. Businesses proclaim their faith: “By His Grace Building Materials”, “Merciful Wigs”, “God Is in Control Windscreens”, “Amazing Love Aluminium”. Evangelical singing drifts on the wind past smiling billboards promising a better tomorrow. A local woman in Accra Credit: GETTY “Forward Ever, Backward Never” was the battle cry of Ghana’s first President Kwame Nkrumah, his statue in Accra pointing at the untapped potential. The white masters used to play polo on the exact spot where his memorial now stands and where independence from British rule was declared in 1957. Today, neatly symbolising Ghana’s journey, Accra Polo Club has moved closer to the international airport: rich African hedge-fund managers rubbing shoulders with European ex-pats. The club archives include photographs of all-white teams posing with pith helmets and neat moustaches, but on the field and in the bar, Ghana’s new elite cuts across any racial divide. Boats outside one of Ghana's Unesco-recognised forts Credit: GETTY “I suppose I am most proud of the fact that I have not been controversial,” Jimmy Moxon had told me in his garden in the Aburi hills in 1994 when I asked how he had managed to survive the turmoil that surrounded independence. His diplomatic skills served Jimmy well, but also stand as a metaphor for the way Ghana has navigated its post-colonial path. There have been obstacles, and challenges remain, but optimism and decency seem to flourish in the tropical climate. “Just come home,” says Catherine Afeku, Ghana’s tourism minister. “We are family.” She has ambitious plans to transform the country’s tourist industry, to encourage the British to see it as a holiday destination. She imagines charter planes, buzzing south over the Sahara, filled with tourists from the UK, many with ancestral links but also those who fancy an African adventure in a land where the language is familiar, the clocks won’t keep you awake at night and the welcome is warm. Ghana hopes more Britons will consider an adventure there Credit: GETTY “When you look at the European market, we are truly the centre of the world,” Mrs Afeku tells me with a smile, pointing out that the Greenwich Meridian meets the equator closest to Ghana. There is an irony in this. The meridian was first devised by an 18th-century economist who actively supported the expansion of the slave trade. The Greenwich Meridian, a century later, symbolised the centrality of British imperial power. At a glance | The destinations that use GMT But such observations tend to be met with a shrug in modern Ghana. “We share a common heritage. After two hundred years you took a break and now we would like you to come back,” the minister says with a laugh, “for short stays this time.” The idea of a weekend break to the golden beaches on the Gulf of Guinea, or the safari lodges in the northern region, might seem fanciful right now. Visa requirements, yellow-fever inoculations, anti-malaria pills: the white man’s grave of West Africa can seem a daunting destination. But the country’s pro-business government wants to change that perception, stressing how Ghana has had 25 years of stable democracy and is ready to welcome the world through its doors. Sandy beaches are one of the country's draws Credit: GETTY The expansion of Accra airport means five million passengers can soon be accommodated each year. The city’s Ambassador Hotel, a gift from the United Kingdom to Ghana at independence in 1957, has been rebuilt as a five-star Mövenpick. An impressive Kempinski hotel has recently opened next to a luxury shopping mall. Walk past the diplomatic limos and saluting chauffeurs into the elegant lobby of the Kempinski and you will hear the unmistakable murmur of deal making. “A lot of British ex-pats are coming back to invest in tourism,” says Manish Nambiar, the hotel’s urbane general manager. “We see huge opportunity.” At a glance | Overseas arrivals in Ghana The hotel has a refreshing rooftop swimming pool and will soon open a glamorous spa but, for the moment, the sunloungers are mostly occupied by eager business executives and the aircrew who got them here. Ghana clearly has huge potential as a holiday destination, although the infrastructure is not yet fully in place. The main road west from Accra is a stationary wall of vehicles much of the time. But with customary resourcefulness, the locals turn the traffic jam into a commercial opportunity. Hawkers weave between the cars with an extraordinary array of products balanced on their heads: cassava, pineapples, eggs, giant snails, board games, pig genitalia, clocks – whatever you might need, it will find you on the Cape Coast Road. Could the country become a new hub for winter sun holidays? Credit: GETTY There is a striking creativity about Ghana: in art, music, fashion and food, world-class talent is emerging from often stunning poverty. On the beach at Jamestown, in the shadow of the old Accra slave dungeons, a shanty town of slums grimly defines the challenge. Yet, next door on the sand, there is an inspiring charity school where some of the very poorest street children can get an education. Across the road, is a grassless football pitch where some of Ghana’s best players honed their skills. Slave masters once traded their human wares here; now Premier League scouts come with their chequebooks. There is a striking creativity in art, music, fashion and food Credit: getty Roads are being improved, tourist attractions opening on the shore line, in the jungle and across the savannah. Ghana is turning a new corner on its journey and travelling without the baggage of post-colonial resentment. Quite the opposite. There is a remarkable generosity of spirit here. 23 African adventures you must have in your lifetime Standing on the veranda of what was once Jimmy’s house, I look out on the country he loved and which so loved him, to Frank’s garden where he and I gave libations to the spirits and he tried to persuade me that southern Ghana was not that different to Shropshire. Chief Nana Kofi Obonyaa would have approved of what this country is trying to do. Mark Easton is the Home Editor for BBC News How to visit Ghana British Airways (ba.com) offers direct flights from London to Accra from £503 return in March. The Kempinski Gold Coast City Hotel (kempinski.com) has a weekend rate of $250 (£180) for two sharing, and offers discounts for longer stays. Operators offering longer itineraries to Ghana and West Africa include overland specialists Dragoman (dragoman.com), luxury and tailor-made specialists Cox & Kings (coxandkings.co.uk) and Accra-based Ashanti African Tours (ashantiafricantours.com). For more information on tourism to Ghana, see touringghana.com and ghana.travel.

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