FC Barcelona vs. AC Milan

El campeón inició la defensa del título de Champions League.

"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say (AFP Photo/LLUIS GENE)
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say (AFP Photo/LLUIS GENE)
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard (AFP Photo/Josep LAGO)
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard (AFP Photo/Josep LAGO)
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
No escape: In Barcelona, protesters have hit the beaches to make their message heard
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
"Barcelona is not for sale," protesters say
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
La Decimotercera: cuando un título vale más que dos
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
La Decimotercera: cuando un título vale más que dos
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
La Decimotercera: cuando un título vale más que dos
El Barcelona logró la Liga y la Copa, pero el Real Madrid mancha ese doblete ganando la final de Champions League.
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
La noche que Barcelona cantó el "You'll Never Walk Alone"
El conjunto blaugrana ha tenido un bonito gesto en las redes sociales felicitando a su eterno rival por la conquista del título europeo
El Barcelona felicita al Real Madrid por su 13ª Champions League
El conjunto blaugrana ha tenido un bonito gesto en las redes sociales felicitando a su eterno rival por la conquista del título europeo
El defensa catalán dio la enhorabuena a los blancos por ganar la Champions League y pidió "reflexionar" sobre las "prioridades" de los culés.
Puyol felicita al Real Madrid y critica al Barcelona
El defensa catalán dio la enhorabuena a los blancos por ganar la Champions League y pidió "reflexionar" sobre las "prioridades" de los culés.
El luso sumó su quinta Liga de Campeones, las mismas que acumula el club catalán a lo largo de toda su historia.
Cristiano Ronaldo ya tiene las mismas Champions que el Barcelona
El luso sumó su quinta Liga de Campeones, las mismas que acumula el club catalán a lo largo de toda su historia.
El conjunto blanco consiguió otro festejo en la final de la Supercopa de España ante el Barcelona.
Todos los títulos del Real Madrid
El conjunto blanco consiguió otro festejo en la final de la Supercopa de España ante el Barcelona.
Torcedor do time merengue na infância, meia relembrou goleada sofrida quando defendia o Albacete nas categorias de base
Iniesta revela que já sentiu raiva do Barcelona quando era criança
Torcedor do time merengue na infância, meia relembrou goleada sofrida quando defendia o Albacete nas categorias de base
<div>  </div> <p>A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next <em>Bridesmaids</em>. Last year they chased the success of <em>Rough Night</em> and <em>Girls Trip</em>. Netflix&#39;s <em>Ibiza</em> will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.</p> <p>Directed by Alex Richanbach, <em>Ibiza</em> is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/04/13/best-movie-streaming-sites/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies</a></p></div> <p>The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper&#39;s protests.</p> <p>On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it&#39;s unclear what they see in each other, but they&#39;re both kind of dorks who aren&#39;t sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn&#39;s quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn&#39;t hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue.&#160;</p> <p>After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he&#39;s supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper&#39;s mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper&#39;s client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (<em>Sense8</em>&#39;s Miguel &#193;ngel Silvestre).</p>  <p>Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress&#39;s own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from <em>Community</em>).&#160;</p> <p>One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the <em>SNL </em>vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there&#39;s not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act&#39;s face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.</p> <p>&#8220;In a great rom-com, when they really work, it&#8217;s because there are two romances going on,&#8221; Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. &#8220;There&#8217;s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the &#8203;<em>romance</em>&#8203;. And this had the opportunity to be both.&#8221;&#160;</p>  <p>Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in &#39;Ibiza.&#39;</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero&#39;s quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.</p> <p>We&#8217;re not interested in Harper&#8217;s super important work meeting, and we&#8217;re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper&#8217;s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning &#8211; and what semi-functional adult hasn&#8217;t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn&#8217;t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.</p> <p>Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of &quot;Despacito&quot;), and regular doses of sex and humor, <em>Ibiza</em> is the best trip you can take this weekend.</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> is now streaming on Netflix.</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2018/05/21/rom-com-cliche-moments/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
'Ibiza' is the perfect movie to kickstart your summer

A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next Bridesmaids. Last year they chased the success of Rough Night and Girls Trip. Netflix's Ibiza will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.

Directed by Alex Richanbach, Ibiza is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.

The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper's protests.

On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it's unclear what they see in each other, but they're both kind of dorks who aren't sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn's quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn't hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue. 

After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he's supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper's mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper's client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (Sense8's Miguel Ángel Silvestre).

Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress's own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from Community). 

One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the SNL vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there's not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act's face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.

“In a great rom-com, when they really work, it’s because there are two romances going on,” Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. “There’s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the ​romance​. And this had the opportunity to be both.” 

Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in 'Ibiza.'

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero's quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.

We’re not interested in Harper’s super important work meeting, and we’re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper’s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning – and what semi-functional adult hasn’t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?

Ibiza works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn’t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.

Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of "Despacito"), and regular doses of sex and humor, Ibiza is the best trip you can take this weekend.

Ibiza is now streaming on Netflix.

<div>  </div> <p>A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next <em>Bridesmaids</em>. Last year they chased the success of <em>Rough Night</em> and <em>Girls Trip</em>. Netflix&#39;s <em>Ibiza</em> will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.</p> <p>Directed by Alex Richanbach, <em>Ibiza</em> is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/04/13/best-movie-streaming-sites/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies</a></p></div> <p>The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper&#39;s protests.</p> <p>On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it&#39;s unclear what they see in each other, but they&#39;re both kind of dorks who aren&#39;t sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn&#39;s quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn&#39;t hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue.&#160;</p> <p>After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he&#39;s supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper&#39;s mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper&#39;s client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (<em>Sense8</em>&#39;s Miguel &#193;ngel Silvestre).</p>  <p>Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress&#39;s own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from <em>Community</em>).&#160;</p> <p>One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the <em>SNL </em>vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there&#39;s not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act&#39;s face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.</p> <p>&#8220;In a great rom-com, when they really work, it&#8217;s because there are two romances going on,&#8221; Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. &#8220;There&#8217;s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the &#8203;<em>romance</em>&#8203;. And this had the opportunity to be both.&#8221;&#160;</p>  <p>Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in &#39;Ibiza.&#39;</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero&#39;s quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.</p> <p>We&#8217;re not interested in Harper&#8217;s super important work meeting, and we&#8217;re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper&#8217;s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning &#8211; and what semi-functional adult hasn&#8217;t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn&#8217;t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.</p> <p>Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of &quot;Despacito&quot;), and regular doses of sex and humor, <em>Ibiza</em> is the best trip you can take this weekend.</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> is now streaming on Netflix.</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2018/05/21/rom-com-cliche-moments/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
'Ibiza' is the perfect movie to kickstart your summer

A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next Bridesmaids. Last year they chased the success of Rough Night and Girls Trip. Netflix's Ibiza will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.

Directed by Alex Richanbach, Ibiza is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.

The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper's protests.

On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it's unclear what they see in each other, but they're both kind of dorks who aren't sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn's quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn't hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue. 

After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he's supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper's mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper's client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (Sense8's Miguel Ángel Silvestre).

Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress's own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from Community). 

One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the SNL vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there's not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act's face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.

“In a great rom-com, when they really work, it’s because there are two romances going on,” Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. “There’s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the ​romance​. And this had the opportunity to be both.” 

Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in 'Ibiza.'

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero's quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.

We’re not interested in Harper’s super important work meeting, and we’re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper’s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning – and what semi-functional adult hasn’t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?

Ibiza works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn’t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.

Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of "Despacito"), and regular doses of sex and humor, Ibiza is the best trip you can take this weekend.

Ibiza is now streaming on Netflix.

<div>  </div> <p>A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next <em>Bridesmaids</em>. Last year they chased the success of <em>Rough Night</em> and <em>Girls Trip</em>. Netflix&#39;s <em>Ibiza</em> will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.</p> <p>Directed by Alex Richanbach, <em>Ibiza</em> is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/04/13/best-movie-streaming-sites/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies</a></p></div> <p>The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper&#39;s protests.</p> <p>On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it&#39;s unclear what they see in each other, but they&#39;re both kind of dorks who aren&#39;t sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn&#39;s quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn&#39;t hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue.&#160;</p> <p>After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he&#39;s supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper&#39;s mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper&#39;s client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (<em>Sense8</em>&#39;s Miguel &#193;ngel Silvestre).</p>  <p>Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress&#39;s own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from <em>Community</em>).&#160;</p> <p>One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the <em>SNL </em>vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there&#39;s not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act&#39;s face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.</p> <p>&#8220;In a great rom-com, when they really work, it&#8217;s because there are two romances going on,&#8221; Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. &#8220;There&#8217;s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the &#8203;<em>romance</em>&#8203;. And this had the opportunity to be both.&#8221;&#160;</p>  <p>Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in &#39;Ibiza.&#39;</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero&#39;s quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.</p> <p>We&#8217;re not interested in Harper&#8217;s super important work meeting, and we&#8217;re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper&#8217;s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning &#8211; and what semi-functional adult hasn&#8217;t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn&#8217;t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.</p> <p>Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of &quot;Despacito&quot;), and regular doses of sex and humor, <em>Ibiza</em> is the best trip you can take this weekend.</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> is now streaming on Netflix.</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2018/05/21/rom-com-cliche-moments/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
'Ibiza' is the perfect movie to kickstart your summer

A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next Bridesmaids. Last year they chased the success of Rough Night and Girls Trip. Netflix's Ibiza will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.

Directed by Alex Richanbach, Ibiza is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.

The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper's protests.

On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it's unclear what they see in each other, but they're both kind of dorks who aren't sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn's quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn't hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue. 

After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he's supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper's mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper's client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (Sense8's Miguel Ángel Silvestre).

Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress's own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from Community). 

One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the SNL vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there's not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act's face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.

“In a great rom-com, when they really work, it’s because there are two romances going on,” Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. “There’s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the ​romance​. And this had the opportunity to be both.” 

Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in 'Ibiza.'

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero's quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.

We’re not interested in Harper’s super important work meeting, and we’re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper’s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning – and what semi-functional adult hasn’t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?

Ibiza works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn’t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.

Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of "Despacito"), and regular doses of sex and humor, Ibiza is the best trip you can take this weekend.

Ibiza is now streaming on Netflix.

<div>  </div> <p>A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next <em>Bridesmaids</em>. Last year they chased the success of <em>Rough Night</em> and <em>Girls Trip</em>. Netflix&#39;s <em>Ibiza</em> will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.</p> <p>Directed by Alex Richanbach, <em>Ibiza</em> is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/04/13/best-movie-streaming-sites/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies</a></p></div> <p>The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper&#39;s protests.</p> <p>On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it&#39;s unclear what they see in each other, but they&#39;re both kind of dorks who aren&#39;t sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn&#39;s quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn&#39;t hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue.&#160;</p> <p>After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he&#39;s supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper&#39;s mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper&#39;s client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (<em>Sense8</em>&#39;s Miguel &#193;ngel Silvestre).</p>  <p>Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress&#39;s own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from <em>Community</em>).&#160;</p> <p>One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the <em>SNL </em>vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there&#39;s not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act&#39;s face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.</p> <p>&#8220;In a great rom-com, when they really work, it&#8217;s because there are two romances going on,&#8221; Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. &#8220;There&#8217;s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the &#8203;<em>romance</em>&#8203;. And this had the opportunity to be both.&#8221;&#160;</p>  <p>Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in &#39;Ibiza.&#39;</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero&#39;s quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.</p> <p>We&#8217;re not interested in Harper&#8217;s super important work meeting, and we&#8217;re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper&#8217;s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning &#8211; and what semi-functional adult hasn&#8217;t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn&#8217;t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.</p> <p>Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of &quot;Despacito&quot;), and regular doses of sex and humor, <em>Ibiza</em> is the best trip you can take this weekend.</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> is now streaming on Netflix.</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2018/05/21/rom-com-cliche-moments/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
'Ibiza' is the perfect movie to kickstart your summer

A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next Bridesmaids. Last year they chased the success of Rough Night and Girls Trip. Netflix's Ibiza will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.

Directed by Alex Richanbach, Ibiza is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.

The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper's protests.

On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it's unclear what they see in each other, but they're both kind of dorks who aren't sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn's quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn't hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue. 

After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he's supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper's mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper's client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (Sense8's Miguel Ángel Silvestre).

Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress's own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from Community). 

One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the SNL vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there's not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act's face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.

“In a great rom-com, when they really work, it’s because there are two romances going on,” Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. “There’s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the ​romance​. And this had the opportunity to be both.” 

Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in 'Ibiza.'

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero's quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.

We’re not interested in Harper’s super important work meeting, and we’re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper’s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning – and what semi-functional adult hasn’t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?

Ibiza works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn’t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.

Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of "Despacito"), and regular doses of sex and humor, Ibiza is the best trip you can take this weekend.

Ibiza is now streaming on Netflix.

<div>  </div> <p>A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next <em>Bridesmaids</em>. Last year they chased the success of <em>Rough Night</em> and <em>Girls Trip</em>. Netflix&#39;s <em>Ibiza</em> will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.</p> <p>Directed by Alex Richanbach, <em>Ibiza</em> is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="https://mashable.com/2018/04/13/best-movie-streaming-sites/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">From Netflix to Hulu, the best streaming sites for movies</a></p></div> <p>The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper&#39;s protests.</p> <p>On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it&#39;s unclear what they see in each other, but they&#39;re both kind of dorks who aren&#39;t sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn&#39;s quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn&#39;t hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue.&#160;</p> <p>After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he&#39;s supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper&#39;s mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper&#39;s client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (<em>Sense8</em>&#39;s Miguel &#193;ngel Silvestre).</p>  <p>Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress&#39;s own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from <em>Community</em>).&#160;</p> <p>One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the <em>SNL </em>vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there&#39;s not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act&#39;s face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.</p> <p>&#8220;In a great rom-com, when they really work, it&#8217;s because there are two romances going on,&#8221; Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. &#8220;There&#8217;s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the &#8203;<em>romance</em>&#8203;. And this had the opportunity to be both.&#8221;&#160;</p>  <p>Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in &#39;Ibiza.&#39;</p><div><p>Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix</p></div><p>The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero&#39;s quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.</p> <p>We&#8217;re not interested in Harper&#8217;s super important work meeting, and we&#8217;re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper&#8217;s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning &#8211; and what semi-functional adult hasn&#8217;t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn&#8217;t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.</p> <p>Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of &quot;Despacito&quot;), and regular doses of sex and humor, <em>Ibiza</em> is the best trip you can take this weekend.</p> <p><em>Ibiza</em> is now streaming on Netflix.</p> <div> <h2><a href="https://mashable.com/2018/05/21/rom-com-cliche-moments/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Ent-Partial" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: Here are 5 unrealistic things that happen in every romantic comedy</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
'Ibiza' is the perfect movie to kickstart your summer

A few years ago, every movie studio wanted the next Bridesmaids. Last year they chased the success of Rough Night and Girls Trip. Netflix's Ibiza will be compared to all three, but it also reveals the secret: There will never be enough of these movies.

Directed by Alex Richanbach, Ibiza is a welcome newbie in this movie tradition, ostensibly with nothing new to bring to the table. But three excellent leads with effortless chemistry and a hilarious script make it the perfect friend-caper-slash-rom-com to start your summer.

The plot is blissfully simple: Harper (Gillian Jacobs) is sent to Barcelona to court an important client for her PR company. Her girlfriends Nikki (Vanessa Bayer) and Leah (Phoebe Robinson) tag along to make a getaway of it, despite Harper's protests.

On their first night in Barcelona, Harper spots Leo (Richard Madden), a super hot night club D.J. They hit it off; one weakness of the film might be that it's unclear what they see in each other, but they're both kind of dorks who aren't sure how to act on apparent intial attraction. The actors have sufficient chemistry to make you want to see them back in the same room again, stat. Lauryn Kahn's quick-witted script punches up every interaction, and it doesn't hurt to hear Madden in his natural Scottish brogue. 

After the requisite meet-cute, Leo has to go on stage, and the ladies end up at an after-party where he's supposed to be in attendance. They kill time and do drugs to distract from Harper's mounting anxiety; Nikki entertains herself texting and eventually calling Harper's client in the area, and Leah gets into some literal hot water with a married man (Sense8's Miguel Ángel Silvestre).

Richard Madden as dreamy D.J. Leo, frosted tips and all.

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

Robinson gets some hilarious and snappy one-liners, and Leah is largely a product of the actress's own effervescent personality, and Jacobs plays the straight girl with aplomb (a more distilled version of Britta from Community). 

One could argue that the breakout is Bayer, whose character could easily have been annoying-bordering-on-dead weight. In the hands of the SNL vet, Nikki is an almost elegant blend of endearing and oblivious. Collectively, they form a beautiful unit; there's not a fight to behold throughout the film, and the final act's face-saving set piece is wonderful comedy and friendship goals to boot.

“In a great rom-com, when they really work, it’s because there are two romances going on,” Richanbach said in a Netflix press release. “There’s one that is the friendship storyline and the other is the ​romance​. And this had the opportunity to be both.” 

Phoebe Robinson, Gillian Jacobs, and Vanessa Bayer in 'Ibiza.'

Image: ALEKSANDAR LETIC/netflix

The girls learn that Leo has another gig that night in Ibiza, so they hop a last minute flight to chase love dick. Yes, in addition to a story about friendship and love, this movie is also a hero's quest; they have to make it back to Barcelona by the next morning or Harper loses her job.

We’re not interested in Harper’s super important work meeting, and we’re not expected to be interested. Instead of treating it as life-or-death, the film sells it through her acerbic boss (Michaela Watkins) and Harper’s own dictation to her friends that they are going to party all night and suck it up in the morning – and what semi-functional adult hasn’t shared the experience of balling too hard one night and struggling stoically through work the next morning?

Ibiza works because it knows exactly what it is. It doesn’t bother weighing the characters down with too many problems or backstory, because the realer it gets, the less fun we have. When Harper does try to tell someone about her sexual dry spell and her difficult boss, her friends immediately cut to stop the oversharing. Nobody cares, they point out; they came to Spain to escape any baggage they may have had, and their wild night out exists in a vacuum for us.

Filled with pool parties, club music (one scene has perhaps the best use ever of "Despacito"), and regular doses of sex and humor, Ibiza is the best trip you can take this weekend.

Ibiza is now streaming on Netflix.

O ex-jogador do Barcelona lamentou a saída do craque egípcio, na decisão da Champions League
Ronaldinho Gaúcho não vê maldade de Sergio Ramos em cima de Salah
O ex-jogador do Barcelona lamentou a saída do craque egípcio, na decisão da Champions League
Inmediaciones del lugar en el que un anciano ha resultado herido hoy en Barcelona al ser atropellado por un autobús urbano de TMB, cuyo conductor prosiguió su ruta sin detenerse pese a las advertencias y recriminaciones de los pasajeros, que se han percatado del suceso, ha explicado a Efe una testigo de los hechos. EFE
Inmediaciones del lugar en el que un anciano ha resultado herido hoy en Barcelona al ser atropellado por un autobús urbano de TMB, cuyo conductor prosiguió su ruta sin detenerse pese a las advertencias y recriminaciones de los pasajeros, que se han percatado del suceso, ha explicado a Efe una testigo de los hechos. EFE
Inmediaciones del lugar en el que un anciano ha resultado herido hoy en Barcelona al ser atropellado por un autobús urbano de TMB, cuyo conductor prosiguió su ruta sin detenerse pese a las advertencias y recriminaciones de los pasajeros, que se han percatado del suceso, ha explicado a Efe una testigo de los hechos. EFE
<p>Esposa del brasileño <a href="https://es.sports.yahoo.com/noticias/marcelo-sucedi%C3%B3-barcelona-iba-pasar-003800439.html?guccounter=1" data-ylk="slk:Marcelo;outcm:mb_qualified_link;_E:mb_qualified_link" class="link rapid-noclick-resp newsroom-embed-article"><strong>Marcelo</strong></a>, junto a su hijo Enzo, antes del pitazo inicial. </p>
Clarisse Alves

Esposa del brasileño Marcelo, junto a su hijo Enzo, antes del pitazo inicial.

El alero del Barcelona Lassa, Victor Claver (d), disputa un balón ante el ala pívot estadounidense del Morabanc Andorra, John Shurna, durante el partido jugado en el Palau Blaugrana de Barcelona, correspondiente a la jornada 31 de la Liga ACB. EFE
El alero del Barcelona Lassa, Victor Claver (d), disputa un balón ante el ala pívot estadounidense del Morabanc Andorra, John Shurna, durante el partido jugado en el Palau Blaugrana de Barcelona, correspondiente a la jornada 31 de la Liga ACB. EFE
El alero del Barcelona Lassa, Victor Claver (d), disputa un balón ante el ala pívot estadounidense del Morabanc Andorra, John Shurna, durante el partido jugado en el Palau Blaugrana de Barcelona, correspondiente a la jornada 31 de la Liga ACB. EFE
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix - Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain - May 13, 2018 Red Bull’s Max Verstappen celebrates on the podium with his trophy after finishing in third place REUTERS/Albert Gea
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix - Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain - May 13, 2018 Red Bull’s Max Verstappen celebrates on the podium with his trophy after finishing in third place REUTERS/Albert Gea
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix - Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain - May 13, 2018 Red Bull’s Max Verstappen celebrates on the podium with his trophy after finishing in third place REUTERS/Albert Gea
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix
Formula One F1 - Spanish Grand Prix - Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain - May 13, 2018 Red Bull’s Max Verstappen celebrates on the podium with his trophy after finishing in third place REUTERS/Albert Gea
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Barcelona player Deco arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Barcelona player Deco arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Barcelona player Deco arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
Kiev (Ukraine), 26/05/2018.- Former Real Madrid and Barcelona player Luis Figo arrives for the UEFA Champions League final between Real Madrid and Liverpool FC at the NSC Olimpiyskiy stadium in Kiev, Ukraine, 26 May 2018. (Liga de Campeones, Ucrania) EFE/EPA/GEORGI LICOVSKI
The Spain international saw proposed switches fall through in 2017 and January and has taken a swipe at his former club&#39;s president, Jokin Aperribay
Martinez accuses Real Sociedad of blocking Man City & Barcelona moves
The Spain international saw proposed switches fall through in 2017 and January and has taken a swipe at his former club's president, Jokin Aperribay
The Spain international saw proposed switches fall through in 2017 and January and has taken a swipe at his former club&#39;s president, Jokin Aperribay
Martinez accuses Real Sociedad of blocking Man City & Barcelona moves
The Spain international saw proposed switches fall through in 2017 and January and has taken a swipe at his former club's president, Jokin Aperribay
The ex-Brazil and Barcelona idol insists he has no plans to marry one person, let alone two - although he did see the funny side of the story
'It's just the biggest lie' - Ronaldinho laughs off reports of three-person marriage
The ex-Brazil and Barcelona idol insists he has no plans to marry one person, let alone two - although he did see the funny side of the story
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund&#39;s serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
Kyle Edmund's unorthodox journey towards the top, from Goole's green clay to French Open seed
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund's serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund&#39;s serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
Kyle Edmund's unorthodox journey towards the top, from Goole's green clay to French Open seed
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund's serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund&#39;s serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
Kyle Edmund's unorthodox journey towards the top, from Goole's green clay to French Open seed
Look down the list of seeds at the French Open, and you’ll find players who learned their clay-court skills in Barcelona, or Hamburg, or Vienna. But only one man started out on the green granules of Goole Rugby Club. British players usually prefer slicker, faster surfaces, such as indoor hard courts or grass. So as the first clay-court expert to come out of Yorkshire, world No 17 Kyle Edmund is a significant outlier. “It’s one of those things that sounds funny,” Edmund admitted during a recent conversation with The Telegraph. “Goole – it’s nowhere. But everyone will have that sort of story because you won’t get many players who say ‘Yeah, when I was eight or 10, my first experience was at this amazing court’. Those were the nearest clay courts, when I was in Beverley with [Lawn Tennis Association coach] Richard Plews,” added Edmund. “We’d go down there once a week. It was American clay – my first experience of that.” Plews was the man who first spotted Edmund’s potential when he showed up at a summer camp. Eight years old at the time, this blond and bashful child had zero tennis experience. What he did have was obvious athletic ability and precociously fast hands, which would later make him the first pupil at Pocklington School to drive a cricket ball all the way from the pitch to a classroom window. Why Kyle Edmund is made for clay and the French Open “One of the amazing things is that Kyle has established himself as a bit of a clay-court specialist,” Plews told The Telegraph. “It’s all the more impressive because he wasn’t bought up on the red clay of Europe, and he hasn’t done extended periods training out there – not for months at a time, anyway. “But you can learn to move on that green clay, even if it doesn’t play quite like the real stuff. That’s why I would take the Academy kids over to Goole. They’d come out of school, I’d pick them up and drive over, and we’d be doing tennis quizzes as we went along. Then they’d all go quiet as we approached, because it’s a pretty uninspiring place, flat and treeless for about five miles either side, and they’d be looking to see how far the nets were flying up. Most of the time, it was blowing a f---ing hoolie.” A lot is said and written about the need for more indoor courts in Britain, but surfaces can be an issue too. As a young junior, Edmund played on carpet, artificial grass, macadam, green clay – anything but the three types of court (hard, grass, red clay) that the ATP tour is actually built around. But you will never hear Edmund complain about such things. Apart from smiting his cannon-like forehand, the one thing he has always done better than the rest of Britain’s hopefuls is to put his head down and get on with it, come rain, shine or “f---ing hoolie”. Plews says Edmund's serve is his biggest improvement this year Credit: Getty Images “He is one of those guys with laser-beam focus,” says Plews. “He’s never meteoric; he doesn’t make sudden progress and knock down walls. But he is always improving. The biggest thing this year has been his serve. He’s getting a lot more traction with it, which means that his serve-forehand combos are becoming more prevalent. When he was with us, we had him sparring with older players, building a game that he wasn’t quite capable of playing yet. The great thing was that he always had an understanding of what he was working towards. He did OK in young juniors, but it wasn’t until he was 14 [the year when Edmund won nationals in Bournemouth, on a similar claylike surface to the one he had trained on in Goole] that it all started coming together.” Today, Edmund must rank among the world’s most dangerous players on this hugely demanding surface. Earlier this month, he took out both former French Open champion Novak Djokovic and world No. 10 David Goffin on the red clay of Madrid. Kyle Edmund is congratulated Novak Djokovic after defeating the former world No.1 earlier this month Credit: Getty Images Here in Paris, his campaign will begin against 19-year-old Australian Alex de Minaur, a man he ousted easily from the Estoril draw three weeks ago. “He has lots of energy and runs down a huge amount of balls,” said Edmund of De Minaur on Saturday. “I always feel like you’re going to be in the rallies [against him]. He’s not a guy that powers you off the court or a big server, but he certainly makes you earn the points. He’s a really good competitor. In one way it’s nice to know what you’re going to get but it’s one thing knowing it and another executing the game plan.” If Edmund delivers in his first couple of matches, he could land a third-round meeting with Fabio Fognini, the Italian No 1 who is one of only three men (along with Alexander Zverev and Dominic Thiem) to take a set off Rafael Nadal on clay this season. Should that fascinating contest come to pass, it will be a real test of character for both men. The expectations around Edmund have climbed dramatically. Seeded at a grand slam for the first time, he is still building on the momentum he established by reaching the semi-finals of January’s Australian Open. “The only reason I’m getting talked about more is that things are going in the right direction,” he said. It has been a magnificent journey, and all the more so because it started in such an unexpected place.
The ex-Brazil and Barcelona idol insists he has no plans to marry one person, let alone two - although he did see the funny side of the story
'It's just the biggest lie' - Ronaldinho laughs off reports of three-person marriage
The ex-Brazil and Barcelona idol insists he has no plans to marry one person, let alone two - although he did see the funny side of the story
Anti-independence supporters take part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region&#39;s new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain&#39;s national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
Anti-independence supporters take part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region's new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain's national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
Anti-independence supporters take part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region's new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain's national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
An anti-independence supporter wearing sunglasses decorated with the colours of the Spanish flag, takes part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region&#39;s new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain&#39;s national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
An anti-independence supporter wearing sunglasses decorated with the colours of the Spanish flag, takes part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region's new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain's national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
An anti-independence supporter wearing sunglasses decorated with the colours of the Spanish flag, takes part in a protest in Barcelona, Spain, Sunday, May 27, 2018. Fervent Catalan secessionist Quim Torra was sworn as the restive Spanish region's new leader, with his demands for an independent Catalonia set to prolong a standoff with Spain's national government. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
De saída? Thiago Alcântara deixa futuro no Bayern em aberto
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
De saída? Thiago Alcântara deixa futuro no Bayern em aberto
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
De saída? Thiago Alcântara deixa futuro no Bayern em aberto
O espanhol tem sido especulado para voltar ao Barcelona, e revelou não ter certeza de onde jogará na próxima temporada
Grifols&#39;s medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols&#39;s medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols&#39;s medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols&#39;s medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols&#39;s medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona
Grifols's medicines are displayed at their headquarters in Sant Cugat del Valles, near Barcelona, Spain May 25, 2018. Picture taken May 25, 2018. REUTERS/Albert Gea

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