El Tour de Francia

La carrera ciclística más importante del planeta rueda en tierras galas.

Quand les champions du Tour de France se défient au foot

Le coureur cycliste Bryan Coquard, au centre, a montré des aptitudes ballon au pied

Manchester United frustre Anfield

Venu à Liverpool pour ne pas perdre, José Mourinho va rentrer à Manchester avec ce qu'il était venu chercher : un 0-0. Cruel pour Liverpool qui aura eu les occasions pour coucher un voisin qui reste invaincu.Liverpool 0-0 Manchester United Un crochet par Anfield comme un après-midi devant une étape de plat du Tour de France. Un Liverpool-MU comme ...

Comic: Rekordpreis für Asterix-Bild

Die berühmtesten aller Gallier sorgen für einen neuen Rekord. Das Original-Titelblatt der sechsten Asterix-Comic-Reihe wurde bei einer Auktion in Paris für … 1,4 Millionen Euro ersteigert. Das ist das Siebenfache des von den Auktionatoren erwarteten Preises. Das Bild von 1964 aus dem Band “Asterix auf Tour de France” (“Le tour de Gaule” auf Französisch) ist von den beiden Erfindern der Comic-Serie Albert Uderzo und Rene Goscinny unterzeichnet. Was den Wert natürlich in die Höhe treibt. Hunderttausende Hefte wurden seit Beginn der Comic-Serie verkauft. Jetzt begeben sich Asterix und Obelix auf eine neue Reise: Dieses Mal geht es im Galopp-Tempo durch Italien. Die beiden Helden nehmen dort an einem Wagenrennen teil. Asterix und Obelix seien noch nie so richtig in Italien gewesen, erklärt der Autor Jean-Yves Ferri. Außerdem sei es eine Hommage an den Erfinder Uderzo und seine italienischen Wurzeln. LA VOICI ENFIN !! La nouvelle couverture d’Astérix et la Transitalique qui sort le 19 octobre. On attend vos retours par Toutatis ! :) pic.twitter.com/CqgJwzVGpi— Astérix (@asterixofficiel) 13 octobre 2017

Comic: Rekordpreis für Asterix-Bild

Die berühmtesten aller Gallier sorgen für einen neuen Rekord. Das Original-Titelblatt der sechsten Asterix-Comic-Reihe wurde bei einer Auktion in Paris für … 1,4 Millionen Euro ersteigert. Das ist das Siebenfache des von den Auktionatoren erwarteten Preises. Das Bild von 1964 aus dem Band “Asterix auf Tour de France” (“Le tour de Gaule” auf Französisch) ist von den beiden Erfindern der Comic-Serie Albert Uderzo und Rene Goscinny unterzeichnet. Was den Wert natürlich in die Höhe treibt. Hunderttausende Hefte wurden seit Beginn der Comic-Serie verkauft. Jetzt begeben sich Asterix und Obelix auf eine neue Reise: Dieses Mal geht es im Galopp-Tempo durch Italien. Die beiden Helden nehmen dort an einem Wagenrennen teil. Asterix und Obelix seien noch nie so richtig in Italien gewesen, erklärt der Autor Jean-Yves Ferri. Außerdem sei es eine Hommage an den Erfinder Uderzo und seine italienischen Wurzeln. LA VOICI ENFIN !! La nouvelle couverture d’Astérix et la Transitalique qui sort le 19 octobre. On attend vos retours par Toutatis ! :) pic.twitter.com/CqgJwzVGpi— Astérix (@asterixofficiel) 13 octobre 2017

Comic: Rekordpreis für Asterix-Bild

Die berühmtesten aller Gallier sorgen für einen neuen Rekord. Das Original-Titelblatt der sechsten Asterix-Comic-Reihe wurde bei einer Auktion in Paris für … 1,4 Millionen Euro ersteigert. Das ist das Siebenfache des von den Auktionatoren erwarteten Preises. Das Bild von 1964 aus dem Band “Asterix auf Tour de France” (“Le tour de Gaule” auf Französisch) ist von den beiden Erfindern der Comic-Serie Albert Uderzo und Rene Goscinny unterzeichnet. Was den Wert natürlich in die Höhe treibt. Hunderttausende Hefte wurden seit Beginn der Comic-Serie verkauft. Jetzt begeben sich Asterix und Obelix auf eine neue Reise: Dieses Mal geht es im Galopp-Tempo durch Italien. Die beiden Helden nehmen dort an einem Wagenrennen teil. Asterix und Obelix seien noch nie so richtig in Italien gewesen, erklärt der Autor Jean-Yves Ferri. Außerdem sei es eine Hommage an den Erfinder Uderzo und seine italienischen Wurzeln. LA VOICI ENFIN !! La nouvelle couverture d’Astérix et la Transitalique qui sort le 19 octobre. On attend vos retours par Toutatis ! :) pic.twitter.com/CqgJwzVGpi— Astérix (@asterixofficiel) 13 octobre 2017

Comic: Rekordpreis für Asterix-Bild

Die berühmtesten aller Gallier sorgen für einen neuen Rekord. Das Original-Titelblatt der sechsten Asterix-Comic-Reihe wurde bei einer Auktion in Paris für … 1,4 Millionen Euro ersteigert. Das ist das Siebenfache des von den Auktionatoren erwarteten Preises. Das Bild von 1964 aus dem Band “Asterix auf Tour de France” (“Le tour de Gaule” auf Französisch) ist von den beiden Erfindern der Comic-Serie Albert Uderzo und Rene Goscinny unterzeichnet. Was den Wert natürlich in die Höhe treibt. Hunderttausende Hefte wurden seit Beginn der Comic-Serie verkauft. Jetzt begeben sich Asterix und Obelix auf eine neue Reise: Dieses Mal geht es im Galopp-Tempo durch Italien. Die beiden Helden nehmen dort an einem Wagenrennen teil. Asterix und Obelix seien noch nie so richtig in Italien gewesen, erklärt der Autor Jean-Yves Ferri. Außerdem sei es eine Hommage an den Erfinder Uderzo und seine italienischen Wurzeln. LA VOICI ENFIN !! La nouvelle couverture d’Astérix et la Transitalique qui sort le 19 octobre. On attend vos retours par Toutatis ! :) pic.twitter.com/CqgJwzVGpi— Astérix (@asterixofficiel) 13 octobre 2017

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

The Top 25 Play-by-Play Broadcasters in Sports 2017

We live in a great era for play-by-play voices. The list of quality game-callers is deep and sports broadcasting has become far more inclusive than ever as evidenced by women (Tiffany Greene, Beth Mowins, Kate Scott, etc…) regularly getting play-by-play assignments that have traditionally been the domain of men only.

Given the quality of talent among play-by-play voices, I thought it would be a fun parlor game to list the 25 best working play-by-play broadcasters in the business. This list is entirely subjective. It is entirely based on my likes when it comes to professionalism, preparation and quality of broadcast. I expect to be told on social media that the list sucks.

Some quick caveats: I did not include announcers working on sports television outside of the United States. If I did broadcasters such as Galvão Bueno, Bob Cole and Martin Tyler would be on the list. (Update: Andrés Cantor of Telemundo would definitely be on my Top 25 below. This was a total screwup on my part. I initially listed Cantor under broadcasters who work outside the U.S but he indeed calls games from inside the U.S. even if many of the teams he calls are non-U.S. teams.) I stayed away from broadcasters who are locally based, such as the fabulous Gary Cohen (New York Mets), Pat Hughes (Chicago Cubs), Jon Miller (San Francisco Giants) and Merrill Reese (Philadelphia Eagles). There are also a ton of quality broadcasters who did not make my Top 25 who would easily make other lists, such as Marv Albert (a likely Top 10 for someone else), Adam Amin, Jason Benetti, Tim Brando, Bob Costas, Joe Davis, Dave Flemming, Dan Hicks, Matt Vasgersian, Ted Robinson, Bob Wischusen and on and on.

But the goal was to come up with a Top 25. So herewith your 2017 list.

25. Verne Lundquist, CBS Sports

I don’t care that he’s retired from college football. He’s on my list so I can give him the option of coming back. Plus, he's still doing college basketball.

24. Beth Mowins, ESPN

The signature voice of the popular Women’s World Series coverage (viewership is around 2 million), one of the best-ever calling women’s basketball and as expected, her NFL work on CBS and ESPN has been strong.

23. Phil Liggett, NBC Sports

The soundtrack for the Tour de France in the United States. He and the equally-terrific Paul Sherwen have called the race together for 32 years.

22. Mary Carillo, The Tennis Channel and NBC Sports

A play-by-play caller who is unafraid to deliver truths while calling a match. Carillo treats broadcasting with a journalistic bent.

21. Arlo White, NBC Sports

For those of us who love the Premier League, White is a treat each weekend.

20. Jim Lampley, HBO Sports

The gold standard for boxing broadcasters.

19. Kevin Burkhardt, Fox Sports

Great to see a grinder keep moving up in the business. Also, a quality studio host.

18. Sean McDonough, ESPN

People have short memories: He and Chris Spielman once formed college football’s best listen.

17. Brad Nessler, CBS

He’s been a seamless fit as the lead voice of the most important college football conference.

16. Dave Pasch, ESPN

An underrated voice who provides quality calls in both college basketball and college football. Plus, he handles Bill Walton.

15. Kenny Albert, Fox Sports, NBC Sports, MSG Networks

Albert’s multi-sport versatility is very impressive and always provides a professional broadcast no matter the sport.

14. Chris Fowler, ESPN

The best tennis match caller working today. There are better on college football but he’s improved each year at that gig, too.

13. Gus Johnson, Fox Sports

Nobody does late-game excitement better than Johnson, who has long showed versatility between college football, college basketball and the NBA.

12. Dan Shulman, ESPN

One of the best national baseball voices around and a quality college basketball voice.

11. Jim Nantz, CBS Sports

A great big event golf voice and his technical skill in helping Tony Romo emerge this year should not go unnoticed.

10. Joe Buck, Fox Sports

Perennially underrated as a baseball voice and he’s self-deprecating on the mic, which is welcome.

9. Kevin Harlan, CBS, Turner Sports, and Westwood One

Morphs easily between audio (calling the NFL) and television (calling the NBA). Pure quality and great pipes.

8. Ian Darke, ESPN

Just an absolutely pleasure to listen to for U.S. soccer fans since he came Stateside. Darke has elevated the call of the U.S. national teams to a place it had not been prior to his assignment.

7. Joe Tessitore, ESPN

In my opinion, Tessitore, Todd Blackledge and Holly Rowe form the best college football group today. He’s also an excellent blow-by-blow caller in boxing.

6. Brian Anderson, CBS Sports, Turner Sports and Fox Sports Wisconsin (Brewers)

This isn’t too high for him. Smart broadcasting marks know the kind of quality Anderson brings on baseball, college basketball and the NBA.

5. Mike Tirico, NBC Sports

The most versatile play by play voice of his generation: Tirico has called primetime NFL games, NBA Finals (on radio), college basketball, major college football including Notre Dame, golf and tennis.

4. Ian Eagle, CBS Sports, Westwood One, Tennis Channel, YES Network

One of the best at infusing humor in a broadcast, an Eagle broadcast is always informative and entertaining.

3. Mike Breen, ESPN/ABC and MSG Networks

Along with being one of the best NBA voices in history, Breen shares the mic with his analysts (ESPN’s Jeff Van Gundy and Mark Jackson and Walt Frazier on MSG) as selflessly as any top play-by-play voice.

2. Al Michaels, NBC Sports

Still the gold standard for the NFL—and still going strong at age 72. He’ll call his 10th Super Bowl on Feb. 4, 2018.

1. Mike Emrick, NBC Sports

Traveling through an alphabet soup of employers (including NBC, CBS, Fox, MSG, VERSUS, TNT, OLN, CSTV, SportsChannel Philadelphia, PRISM and Fox Sports Net) during his five-decade Hall of Fame broadcasting career, Emrick has cemented himself as the announcer most associated with the NHL in America. But his skills go well beyond merely his sport. No working sports broadcaster does frantic better than Emrick, who turned 70 on Aug. 1. He’s also a magnificent wordsmith. We will not see his kind again soon when he leaves.

“My role is to be a conduit between the skill of the players and the understanding of the fans," Emrick once told me. "I'm just more or less someone who can describe something, and hopefully with passion.”

Belgium's Jan Bakelants rides past the Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica as he competes in a 22.5 km individual time-trial, the twentieth stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 22, 2017 in and around Marseille, France

Belgium's Jan Bakelants rides past the Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica as he competes in a 22.5 km individual time-trial, the twentieth stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 22, 2017 in and around Marseille, France

Belgium's Jan Bakelants rides past the Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica as he competes in a 22.5 km individual time-trial, the twentieth stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 22, 2017 in and around Marseille, France (AFP Photo/Jeff PACHOUD)

Belgium's Jan Bakelants rides past the Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica as he competes in a 22.5 km individual time-trial, the twentieth stage of the 104th edition of the Tour de France cycling race on July 22, 2017 in and around Marseille, France

Marlène Schiappa remballe un député impoli à l’Assemblée nationale (Vidéo)

Alors qu’elle répondait à l’Assemblée nationale à une question sur "le tour de France de l'égalité femmes-hommes", Marlène Schiappa, secrétaire d'Etat chargée de l'égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, a remballé avec véhémence un député qui l’a interrompue. Des images à retrouver sur Non Stop Zapping.

Marlène Schiappa remballe un député impoli à l’Assemblée nationale (Vidéo)

Alors qu’elle répondait à l’Assemblée nationale à une question sur "le tour de France de l'égalité femmes-hommes", Marlène Schiappa, secrétaire d'Etat chargée de l'égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, a remballé avec véhémence un député qui l’a interrompue. Des images à retrouver sur Non Stop Zapping.

Marlène Schiappa remballe un député impoli à l’Assemblée nationale (Vidéo)

Alors qu’elle répondait à l’Assemblée nationale à une question sur "le tour de France de l'égalité femmes-hommes", Marlène Schiappa, secrétaire d'Etat chargée de l'égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, a remballé avec véhémence un député qui l’a interrompue. Des images à retrouver sur Non Stop Zapping.

Marlène Schiappa remballe un député impoli à l’Assemblée nationale (Vidéo)

Alors qu’elle répondait à l’Assemblée nationale à une question sur "le tour de France de l'égalité femmes-hommes", Marlène Schiappa, secrétaire d'Etat chargée de l'égalité entre les femmes et les hommes, a remballé avec véhémence un député qui l’a interrompue. Des images à retrouver sur Non Stop Zapping.

Phil Gaimon Opens Up About Living (and Giving Up) His Pro Cycling Dream in New Book "Draft Animals"

Phil Gaimon might be best known for his love of cookies. If you’ve been to a major cycling race in North America over the last six months, you may have seen him sprinting alongside the pros, bare-chested and wearing a blue Cookie Monster Hat while handing out cookies to the riders. He’s also the reigning U.S. hill climbing champion, and has been trolling amateur riders on the social cycling app Strava over the last year, setting record times on roads around the U.S.

But before all of that, Gaimon was a pro cyclist who climbed all the way up to the WorldTour. His latest book, Draft Animals, released on Oct. 10, is the follow-up to Pro Cycling on $10 a Day, and tells the story of the couple of years—2014 and ‘16—that he spent living his longtime dream.

Draft Animals is written with raw honesty. (Parents beware: the book is not PG-13 and has a fair amount of coarse humor.) Like many pro athletes, Gaimon exudes so much confidence that he at times comes across as self-absorbed. He documents his struggles and frustrations dealing with the hierarchy of pro cycling, touching on entitled riders and indifferent bosses, and this book may not win too many of those old colleagues over. But Gaimon also relishes in his memories of the highs. Not just his wins, but the joking around in the peloton during the grind of long stage races, the accomplishment of knowing you were part of a teammate’s success, and the lifelong friends he made in his time at the top.

In 2003, Gaimon, age 17, was inspired to start riding by the exploits of then-superhero Lance Armstrong. Back then, cycling was soaring, and Armstrong was the epitome of the Athletic Dream. He came back from fighting testicular cancer in the mid-90s to win the Tour de France a record seven times before retiring for good in 2011. The sense of betrayal after Armstrong was exposed as a super villain simmers throughout the book. (Armstrong admitted doping to Oprah Winfrey in January of 2013, subsequently had all of his Tour wins stripped, and was banned from pro cycling for life.)

Sponsors disappeared and teams folded or merged in what Gaimon calls the “post-dopocalypse.” Gaimon’s chance of turning his passion into a career faded as WorldTour fields shrank. He raced against—and lost to—former dopers, never sure whether he was really in a fair fight or not. But while he frequently taunted those ex-dopers—in 2010, he had a tattoo of a bar of soap and the word CLEAN inked on the inside of his right bicep—Gaimon also found the world wasn’t a binary contrast between good and evil.

Tom Danielson, who helped Gaimon make the jump up from the continental circuit, and who would end up riding support for him in his first UCI race—Gaimon won the first stage and finished second overall at the 2014 Tour of San Luis—was suspended for six months in ‘12 for blood doping. Jonathan Vaughters, Gaimon’s boss at Garmin in ’14 and Cannondale in ’16, has admitted to doping during his time on Armstrong’s U.S. Postal Service team. And when Danielson tested positive for an anabolic steroid in 2015, Gaimon had to confront the dilemma of not just whether he could trust rehabilitated drug cheats, but whether he could trust one who had become a close friend. (Danielson was suspended for four years, but has claimed the failed test was due to a contaminated supplement.)

If you want to understand how hard succeeding on the pro tour really is, and the sacrifice that demands, this book is a great place to start. On Stage 6 of the Tour of Colorado inn August 2015, as his relationship with his then-fiancé fell apart, and with his dad losing the fight against cancer, Gaimon broke into tears, overwhelmed. He dropped out of the race and flew back home to Atlanta, unsure of whether a DNF (did not finish) would jeopardize his $70,000 contract offer with Cannondale for the following year. When his contract finally arrived, it had been trimmed down to $65,000.

“It’s true that my results in Utah and Colorado were less than we’d expected,” Gaimon writes, “[but] was this the ‘your dad is dying’ tax?”

More than anything else, Draft Animals makes you want to go jump on a bike right now. As a domestique rider and a hill-climbing specialist, Gaimon’s job on the WorldTour was to drag team leaders up mountains, allowing them to shelter in his slipstream while stretching and breaking the peloton with his pace. “Riding in easy to the finish,” he writes about Stage 4 of the Tour of Utah in 2014, which ended with a 3,000-foot climb up Powder Mountain, “I looked down the switchbacks and smiled at the destruction I’d caused.” Gaimon had launched Danielson to a stage win and the yellow jersey.

By the end of the book, you’re left cheering for an imperfect rider, wishing he had just one more real chance to succeed on the pro circuit. Spoiler alert: After struggling for a total of two years on the WorldTour, Gaimon was left without a contract last fall and decided to retire from pro cycling rather than fight his way back up. He’d realized that while he was good enough to deserve a shot at the WorldTour, he wasn’t destined for cycling greatness. “It was time to get out of the way,” he writes. “Let someone else live the dream.”

He labors to sign off on a positive note. Gaimon never achieved most of his goals. But in the struggle he learned balance. Sometimes you need to stop worrying about shaving an extra ounce of body fat just to bump your power-to-weight ratio by a tiny fraction. Sometimes you need to just stop and eat the cookies