El Tour de Francia

La carrera ciclística más importante del planeta rueda en tierras galas.

IDFA: ‘Time Trial’ Director Finlay Pretsell On Working With Tour De France Cyclist David Millar

AMSTERDAM — Sports films mostly follow a familiar arc, usually an underdog story in which the little guy fights back, or comes back, against extraordinary odds. At first glance, that would appear to be the case with IDFA Competition entry “Time Trial”, in which Scottish director Finlay Pretsell chronicles a heroic effort by professional road-racing […]

Cycling - Cycling: Wiggins reputation questioned after TUE revelations

(FILES) This file photo taken on August 12, 2016 shows Britain's Bradley Wiggins celebrating after setting a world record after competing with teammates in the men's Team Pursuit qualifying track cycling event at the Velodrome during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro.A 14-month investigation by United Kingdom Anti-Doping into allegations of wrongdoing at British Cycling and Team Sky has ended with no charges being brought against either organisation due to a "lack of contemporaneous evidence". An inquiry was launched in September 2016 after British newspaper the Daily Mail reported a mystery package had been delivered to Richard Freeman, the doctor of now retired Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins, then a Sky rider. (AFP Photo/Eric FEFERBERG)

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the "Tour De France ":https://freewaydrone.com/tour-de-france-2/?lang=en in 2017.Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the Tour De France in 2017.

Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the Tour De France in 2017.

Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the Tour De France in 2017.

Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

Drone Captures Stunning Footage of Le Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy

This stunning drone footage of Le Mont Saint Michel in Normandy was captured by FreeewayDrone as part of the Tour De France in 2017.

Over a period of three months before the tour began, the group captured drone footage from over 15 different spots throughout France. The footage showcased France’s heritage and was featured alongside the live coverage of the Tour de France. Credit: FREEWAY PROD via Storyful

A Cycling Legend’s Secret War Mission: Saving Italy’s Jews

Under the seat of the bikes he rode to two Tour de France titles, one humble superstar quietly carried the papers that spared hundreds from the Holocaust.

Trail running for beginners: Why everyone should try jogging up Mont Blanc

Arriving in Chamonix is not a little intimidating. Mont Blanc looms over the French adventure town like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man: white, massive, dangerous. It doesn’t seem possible or sensible that I’m going to try to learn to trail run up it – its lower slopes at least – but that’s the aim.  Trail running is the softer-on-the-knees, more spiritual alternative to pounding miles on the pavement. It’s taking exercise into the wilds, embracing nature. You don’t need to be a mountain goat or Paula Radcliffe – a love of running is the main criteria, though you should be of at least average fitness. Speed is not of the essence; trail runs are often long, slow explorations across diverse terrain – including mountains – with lots of hiking and eating stops. Chamonix, home of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (the Tour de France of trail running) is a hotspot for the increasingly popular sport, so I’ve come here to join a five-day Alpine Training Camp run by GB ultra-marathon runner and coach Robbie Britton and his fell-running partner Natalie White. It will, I hope, improve my ability to scoot up and down hills, avoid injuries, eat better and generally become a super-human mountain goat. A big ask for a long weekend. But Robbie can run 162 miles in 24 hours – if anyone can help me, it might be him. Things start well. Our small group of mixed abilities gathers at a beautiful Chamonix chalet where the fridge is full and copious eating is encouraged. Key to understanding how to run in the mountains is learning how to eat in the mountains, and performance dietitian Renee McGregor – who’s sorted the nutritional strategies of many world-class athletes – is on hand. Renee has no truck with food fads: she advocates everything in moderation and real food. I’ll eat to that. The camp is a mix of hard, easy, long and short training sessions, plus informative talks, strength and conditioning advice, yoga, shared meals and convivial lounging. The first, heartening lesson learned is that even top trail runners don’t run all the climbs. As we begin our first ascent from the valley floor to a not-inconsiderable altitude of more than 7,000ft (2,134m), we walk. If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run, says Robbie. Think efficiency – save your legs as much work as possible.  'If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run' Credit: SYSTEM To this end, we practise ascending with poles. Natalie lends me the pair she used to complete the 210-mile – yes, 210-mile – Tor des Géants. With these hallowed sticks, I set about perfecting a tap-tap technique, planting one pole slightly after the other, then pulling my weight through. “If your triceps don’t hurt by the end,” says Robbie, “you’re not doing it right.” Later, I feel a dull arm ache. C+ for effort, perhaps? As lovely as it is to hike amid the mountains – and it is soul-soaringly lovely – this is a running camp. So a calf-burning hill session is scheduled for day two: six lots of three-minute bursts uphill. The fourth burst will be our “favourite”, declares Robbie. Because it’s the toughest challenge, he tells us to flip it: instead of fearing session four, we’ll focus on relishing it. I try this strategy. Short steps, pumping arms, mind over matter. And if favourite is judged by how nearly you throw up, four truly was the best. toughest running races Although running up mountains sounds intimidating, everyone at the camp is more concerned about getting down. So one session is dedicated to descent. “I’m always scared going downhill but fear is good – it keeps you alive,” says Robbie as we stare down a rain-slicked, root-tangled track. “Push just one per cent out of your comfort zone; test the edges of your limits and you will improve.”  We’re given tips on efficiency, on judging terrain, on posture; we’re told to remember to breathe (surprisingly easy to forget).  At least you get poles And then we give it a try; one by one, everyone encouraging everyone else. I skid a bit and nearly collide with Rosa the dog. But I feel my edges expand just a little; my confidence starting to grow. Sadly, Robbie can do nothing about my inner klutz. On our longest day, a seven-hour adventure via pastures, glaciers and the border of Switzerland, I kick a mere pebble on the most innocuous of trails and trip face first into the Alps. It hurts my ego. And my toe, which turns to a livid purple colour.  But still, I love this. I’m a road runner who’s just spent five fun, educational days amid the snow-capped peaks with a pack of positive souls united in what initially sounds like madness: running up mountains. It’s invigorating, restorative, a reminder of being alive. Or maybe that’s just the throbbing in my toe... The verdict **** You’re allowed to walk the steep bits, eat twice an hour and revel in the mountains. What’s not to love?  Need to know Robbie Britton’s Alpine Trail Camp 2018 runs in Chamonix from July 12-16; places are limited and booking is open now. The experience costs £820, including five nights’ accommodation, all food and snacks, coaching, workshops and lift passes; excludes flights (robbiebritton.co.uk/training-camps).

Trail running for beginners: Why everyone should try jogging up Mont Blanc

Arriving in Chamonix is not a little intimidating. Mont Blanc looms over the French adventure town like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man: white, massive, dangerous. It doesn’t seem possible or sensible that I’m going to try to learn to trail run up it – its lower slopes at least – but that’s the aim.  Trail running is the softer-on-the-knees, more spiritual alternative to pounding miles on the pavement. It’s taking exercise into the wilds, embracing nature. You don’t need to be a mountain goat or Paula Radcliffe – a love of running is the main criteria, though you should be of at least average fitness. Speed is not of the essence; trail runs are often long, slow explorations across diverse terrain – including mountains – with lots of hiking and eating stops. Chamonix, home of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (the Tour de France of trail running) is a hotspot for the increasingly popular sport, so I’ve come here to join a five-day Alpine Training Camp run by GB ultra-marathon runner and coach Robbie Britton and his fell-running partner Natalie White. It will, I hope, improve my ability to scoot up and down hills, avoid injuries, eat better and generally become a super-human mountain goat. A big ask for a long weekend. But Robbie can run 162 miles in 24 hours – if anyone can help me, it might be him. Things start well. Our small group of mixed abilities gathers at a beautiful Chamonix chalet where the fridge is full and copious eating is encouraged. Key to understanding how to run in the mountains is learning how to eat in the mountains, and performance dietitian Renee McGregor – who’s sorted the nutritional strategies of many world-class athletes – is on hand. Renee has no truck with food fads: she advocates everything in moderation and real food. I’ll eat to that. The camp is a mix of hard, easy, long and short training sessions, plus informative talks, strength and conditioning advice, yoga, shared meals and convivial lounging. The first, heartening lesson learned is that even top trail runners don’t run all the climbs. As we begin our first ascent from the valley floor to a not-inconsiderable altitude of more than 7,000ft (2,134m), we walk. If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run, says Robbie. Think efficiency – save your legs as much work as possible.  'If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run' Credit: SYSTEM To this end, we practise ascending with poles. Natalie lends me the pair she used to complete the 210-mile – yes, 210-mile – Tor des Géants. With these hallowed sticks, I set about perfecting a tap-tap technique, planting one pole slightly after the other, then pulling my weight through. “If your triceps don’t hurt by the end,” says Robbie, “you’re not doing it right.” Later, I feel a dull arm ache. C+ for effort, perhaps? As lovely as it is to hike amid the mountains – and it is soul-soaringly lovely – this is a running camp. So a calf-burning hill session is scheduled for day two: six lots of three-minute bursts uphill. The fourth burst will be our “favourite”, declares Robbie. Because it’s the toughest challenge, he tells us to flip it: instead of fearing session four, we’ll focus on relishing it. I try this strategy. Short steps, pumping arms, mind over matter. And if favourite is judged by how nearly you throw up, four truly was the best. toughest running races Although running up mountains sounds intimidating, everyone at the camp is more concerned about getting down. So one session is dedicated to descent. “I’m always scared going downhill but fear is good – it keeps you alive,” says Robbie as we stare down a rain-slicked, root-tangled track. “Push just one per cent out of your comfort zone; test the edges of your limits and you will improve.”  We’re given tips on efficiency, on judging terrain, on posture; we’re told to remember to breathe (surprisingly easy to forget).  At least you get poles And then we give it a try; one by one, everyone encouraging everyone else. I skid a bit and nearly collide with Rosa the dog. But I feel my edges expand just a little; my confidence starting to grow. Sadly, Robbie can do nothing about my inner klutz. On our longest day, a seven-hour adventure via pastures, glaciers and the border of Switzerland, I kick a mere pebble on the most innocuous of trails and trip face first into the Alps. It hurts my ego. And my toe, which turns to a livid purple colour.  But still, I love this. I’m a road runner who’s just spent five fun, educational days amid the snow-capped peaks with a pack of positive souls united in what initially sounds like madness: running up mountains. It’s invigorating, restorative, a reminder of being alive. Or maybe that’s just the throbbing in my toe... The verdict **** You’re allowed to walk the steep bits, eat twice an hour and revel in the mountains. What’s not to love?  Need to know Robbie Britton’s Alpine Trail Camp 2018 runs in Chamonix from July 12-16; places are limited and booking is open now. The experience costs £820, including five nights’ accommodation, all food and snacks, coaching, workshops and lift passes; excludes flights (robbiebritton.co.uk/training-camps).

Trail running for beginners: Why everyone should try jogging up Mont Blanc

Arriving in Chamonix is not a little intimidating. Mont Blanc looms over the French adventure town like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man: white, massive, dangerous. It doesn’t seem possible or sensible that I’m going to try to learn to trail run up it – its lower slopes at least – but that’s the aim.  Trail running is the softer-on-the-knees, more spiritual alternative to pounding miles on the pavement. It’s taking exercise into the wilds, embracing nature. You don’t need to be a mountain goat or Paula Radcliffe – a love of running is the main criteria, though you should be of at least average fitness. Speed is not of the essence; trail runs are often long, slow explorations across diverse terrain – including mountains – with lots of hiking and eating stops. Chamonix, home of the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (the Tour de France of trail running) is a hotspot for the increasingly popular sport, so I’ve come here to join a five-day Alpine Training Camp run by GB ultra-marathon runner and coach Robbie Britton and his fell-running partner Natalie White. It will, I hope, improve my ability to scoot up and down hills, avoid injuries, eat better and generally become a super-human mountain goat. A big ask for a long weekend. But Robbie can run 162 miles in 24 hours – if anyone can help me, it might be him. Things start well. Our small group of mixed abilities gathers at a beautiful Chamonix chalet where the fridge is full and copious eating is encouraged. Key to understanding how to run in the mountains is learning how to eat in the mountains, and performance dietitian Renee McGregor – who’s sorted the nutritional strategies of many world-class athletes – is on hand. Renee has no truck with food fads: she advocates everything in moderation and real food. I’ll eat to that. The camp is a mix of hard, easy, long and short training sessions, plus informative talks, strength and conditioning advice, yoga, shared meals and convivial lounging. The first, heartening lesson learned is that even top trail runners don’t run all the climbs. As we begin our first ascent from the valley floor to a not-inconsiderable altitude of more than 7,000ft (2,134m), we walk. If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run, says Robbie. Think efficiency – save your legs as much work as possible.  'If the slope is steep, it makes no sense to run' Credit: SYSTEM To this end, we practise ascending with poles. Natalie lends me the pair she used to complete the 210-mile – yes, 210-mile – Tor des Géants. With these hallowed sticks, I set about perfecting a tap-tap technique, planting one pole slightly after the other, then pulling my weight through. “If your triceps don’t hurt by the end,” says Robbie, “you’re not doing it right.” Later, I feel a dull arm ache. C+ for effort, perhaps? As lovely as it is to hike amid the mountains – and it is soul-soaringly lovely – this is a running camp. So a calf-burning hill session is scheduled for day two: six lots of three-minute bursts uphill. The fourth burst will be our “favourite”, declares Robbie. Because it’s the toughest challenge, he tells us to flip it: instead of fearing session four, we’ll focus on relishing it. I try this strategy. Short steps, pumping arms, mind over matter. And if favourite is judged by how nearly you throw up, four truly was the best. toughest running races Although running up mountains sounds intimidating, everyone at the camp is more concerned about getting down. So one session is dedicated to descent. “I’m always scared going downhill but fear is good – it keeps you alive,” says Robbie as we stare down a rain-slicked, root-tangled track. “Push just one per cent out of your comfort zone; test the edges of your limits and you will improve.”  We’re given tips on efficiency, on judging terrain, on posture; we’re told to remember to breathe (surprisingly easy to forget).  At least you get poles And then we give it a try; one by one, everyone encouraging everyone else. I skid a bit and nearly collide with Rosa the dog. But I feel my edges expand just a little; my confidence starting to grow. Sadly, Robbie can do nothing about my inner klutz. On our longest day, a seven-hour adventure via pastures, glaciers and the border of Switzerland, I kick a mere pebble on the most innocuous of trails and trip face first into the Alps. It hurts my ego. And my toe, which turns to a livid purple colour.  But still, I love this. I’m a road runner who’s just spent five fun, educational days amid the snow-capped peaks with a pack of positive souls united in what initially sounds like madness: running up mountains. It’s invigorating, restorative, a reminder of being alive. Or maybe that’s just the throbbing in my toe... The verdict **** You’re allowed to walk the steep bits, eat twice an hour and revel in the mountains. What’s not to love?  Need to know Robbie Britton’s Alpine Trail Camp 2018 runs in Chamonix from July 12-16; places are limited and booking is open now. The experience costs £820, including five nights’ accommodation, all food and snacks, coaching, workshops and lift passes; excludes flights (robbiebritton.co.uk/training-camps).

FILE - In this Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016 file photo, former Tour de France winner and Olympic Gold medalist Britain's Bradley Wiggins greets spectators prior to competing in the six day race at the Kuipke velodrome in Ghent, Belgium. Britain’s anti-doping agency says Wednesday Nov. 15, 2017, it won’t bring any charges over the medical package dispatched to star Team Sky rider Bradley Wiggins after the investigation was hampered by the lack of accurate records held by cycling authorities. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FRANCE CYCLING TOUR DE FRANCE 2017

Michael Matthews has taken out three major honours at the Cycling Australia awards

Des militants basques lancent un "tour de France des prisons", depuis le pénitencier de Mont-de-Marsan, dans les Landes, le 16 novembre 2017

Cycling - Wiggins reveals 'living hell' after doping probe ditched

(FILES) This file photo taken on October 25, 2016 shows British cyclist Bradley Wiggins waiting to compete on the first day of the London Six Day 2016 cycling event at the Lee Valley VeloPark in east London.A 14-month investigation by United Kingdom Anti-Doping into allegations of wrongdoing at British Cycling and Team Sky has ended with no charges being brought against either organisation due to a "lack of contemporaneous evidence". An inquiry was launched in September 2016 after British newspaper the Daily Mail reported a mystery package had been delivered to Richard Freeman, the doctor of now retired Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins, then a Sky rider. (AFP Photo/Glyn KIRK)

Soupçons de dopage : le Team Sky pas encore tiré d’affaires

Bradley Wiggins restera dans l'histoire comme un cycliste rock'n roll et un vainqueur controversé du Tour de France 2012.

No doping charges in UK cycling probe but methods criticized

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017 file photo, Sky team manager Sir Dave Brailsford attends a press conference ahead of Saturday's start of the Tour de France cycling race in Duesseldorf, Germany. Britains anti-doping agency says Wednesday Nov. 15, 2017, it wont bring any charges over the medical package dispatched to star Team Sky rider Bradley Wiggins after the investigation was hampered by the lack of accurate records held by cycling authorities. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena, File)

No doping charges in UK cycling probe but methods criticized

FILE - In this Sunday, Nov. 20, 2016 file photo, former Tour de France winner and Olympic Gold medalist Britain's Bradley Wiggins greets spectators prior to competing in the six day race at the Kuipke velodrome in Ghent, Belgium. Britains anti-doping agency says Wednesday Nov. 15, 2017, it wont bring any charges over the medical package dispatched to star Team Sky rider Bradley Wiggins after the investigation was hampered by the lack of accurate records held by cycling authorities. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017 file photo, Sky team manager Sir Dave Brailsford attends a press conference ahead of Saturday's start of the Tour de France cycling race in Duesseldorf, Germany. Britain’s anti-doping agency says Wednesday Nov. 15, 2017, it won’t bring any charges over the medical package dispatched to star Team Sky rider Bradley Wiggins after the investigation was hampered by the lack of accurate records held by cycling authorities. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena, File)

Cyclisme - Dernier Tour en 2018 pour Chavanel

Le Tour de France 2018 sera le dernier pour Sylvain Chavanel (Direct Energie). Le coureur de 38 ans n'a pas encore pris de décision sur sa fin de carrière.

Le Tour de France du Japon, c'est possible, les vidéos

L'ex-cycliste Jean-Christophe Péraud chargé de débusquer les moteurs: un symbole d'honnêteté

Jean-Christophe Péraud sur le Tour de France 2014.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Cyclisme - Contador: "Landa peut rivaliser sur un Grand Tour"

Quatrième du dernier Tour de France, le coureur espagnol Mikel Landa a quitté l'équipe britannique Sky, pour sortir de l'ombre de Chris Froome, et rejoint pour deux saisons la formation Movistar. Un bon choix selon son compatriote et jeune retraité Alberto Contador.

Mark Cavendish of Britain (L) celebrates after crossing the finish line in the criterium main race at the Tour de France Saitama Criterium in Saitama on November 4, 2017

Mark Cavendish of Britain (L) celebrates after crossing the finish line in the criterium main race at the Tour de France Saitama Criterium in Saitama on November 4, 2017

Cycling - Cavendish sprints to victory in Japan

Mark Cavendish of Britain (L) celebrates after crossing the finish line ahead of Japan's Fumiyuki Beppu (R) in the criterium main race at the Tour de France Saitama Criterium in Saitama on November 4, 2017. (AFP Photo/Toshifumi KITAMURA)

Cycling - Contador retirement 'end of era' says Froome

Spanish two-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador (in red) negotiates a curve during the China Criterium in Shanghai on October 29, 2017. Tour de France winner Chris Froome won the contest, which is a part of the French race's efforts to increase its brand in China's potentially huge cycling market. (AFP Photo/STR)

Froome conquers China, eyes 5th Tour de France title