El Preolímpico de Baloncesto

En Mar del Plata el continente americano define sus clasificados a Londres.

AP Explains: The search for Argentina's missing submarine

Comandante Espora Argentine ship sails off the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. This ship is is part of a searching crew to find a submarine that hadn't been heard from in three days. Authorities last had contact with the German-built diesel-electric sub, the ARA San Juan, on Wednesday as it was on a voyage from the extreme southern port of Ushuaia to Mar del Plata. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)

An Argentine national flag with a drawing of a submarine hangs from the fence surrounding the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The search continues for the missing submarine, with 44 crew members, that has been lost for six days in the South Atlantic. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)

In this picture released by Argentina's presidential press office, navy base Chief Gabriel Martin Gonzalez, right, talks to Argentina's President Mauricio Macri, over a map at the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017. Authorities last had contact with submarine ARA San Juan on Wednesday as it was on a voyage from the extreme southern port of Ushuaia to the city of Mar del Plata. (Argentina Presidency via AP)

Comandante Espora Argentine ship sails off the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017. This ship is is part of a searching crew to find a submarine that hadn't been heard from in three days. Authorities last had contact with the German-built diesel-electric sub, the ARA San Juan, on Wednesday as it was on a voyage from the extreme southern port of Ushuaia to Mar del Plata. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)

El buque argentino Comandante Espora zarpa de la base naval en Mar del Plata, Argentina, el sábado 18 de noviembre de 2017. El barco forma parte de un equipo de búsqueda para encontrar un submarino desaparecido. (AP Foto/Vicente Robles)

En esta imagen publicada por la oficina de prensa del presidente de Argentina, el jefe de base de la Armada Gabriel Martín González, a la derecha, habla con el presidente de Argentina, Mauricio Macri, sobre un mapa en la base de la Armada de Mar del Plata, Argentina, el lunes 20 de noviembre de 2017. (Presidencia argentina via AP)

En esta imagen publicada por la oficina de prensa del presidente de Argentina, el jefe de base de la Armada Gabriel Martín González, a la derecha, habla con el presidente de Argentina, Mauricio Macri, sobre un mapa en la base de la Armada de Mar del Plata, Argentina, el lunes 20 de noviembre de 2017. (Presidencia argentina via AP)

A man walks past a banner in the colours of the Argentine national flag in Mar del Plata

A man walks past a banner in the colours of the Argentine national flag, outside the Argentine Naval Base where the ARA San Juan submarine that is missing at sea sailed from, in Mar del Plata, Argentina November 20, 2017. The words on the banner read: "Argentines, be strong." REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

A man stands in front of signs in support of the missing crew members of the ARA San Juan submarine in Mar del Plata

A man stands in front of signs in support of the 44 crew members of the ARA San Juan submarine missing at sea, placed on a fence outside the Argentine Naval Base where the submarine sailed from, in Mar del Plata, Argentina November 20, 2017. REUTERS/Marcos Brindicci

Cards, banners with slogans and placards have been strung up on the outside of the Mar del Plata base's wire fence, expressing solidarity with the families tensely waiting for any news

Rescuers race against time to save Argentine submariners

Fears are continuing to grow over the fate of a missing Argentine submarine and its 44-member crew. The ARA San Juan disappeared last Wednesday in waters off Argentina’s eastern coast after reporting an electrical malfunction. The vessel was en route from Ushuaia, the world southern most city, to its base in Mar del Plata. It was about 480 km off the coast when it gave its last location. With every day that passes the situation becomes more critical as the vessel’s seven day oxygen supply will soon run out. However, officials say calmer seas have helped rescue crews in their search: “Waves are not at a height of two metres and as such we can maximize the use of the sensors of all the varied equipment that we have at our disposal,” explained naval commander Gabriel Galeazzi at an evening news conference in Mar de Plata. Wind speeds have slowed and waves that rose as high as eight metres at the weekend have diminished significantly. Argentina’s Navy releases another video reportedly shot from the destroyer ARA Sarandí that shows the poor weather conditions during the search and rescue operations of the submarine ARA San Juan. pic.twitter.com/dLyW99CfTG— Daniel Politi (@dpoliti) November 20, 2017 More than a dozen boats and plannes from Argentina, the United States, Britain, Chile and Brazil have joined the search. As a Royal Navy Submarine Veteran my thoughts and prayers are for my Brother Submariners onboard ARA San Juan pic.twitter.com/FrfCOLLE7M— John Rochford-Browne (@jrochfordbrowne) November 17, 2017 False dawn Also on Tuesday, authorities investigated white flares spotted in the South Atlantic overnight. Searchers found an empty floating raft, and noticed the flares from a distance. But the raft’s brand suggested it did not belong to the ARA San Juan, which was equipped with only red flares for emergencies and green flares for other situations, the navy said. Searchers have suffered other disappointments. Analysis of satellite signals and sounds detected by underwater probes, initially thought to be messages from the crew, has found they did not come from the vessel. “The sounds could be biological. We have discarded the possibility that it was a clanging of morse code against the hull of the submarine,” navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters in Buenos Aires.

Paura per il sottomarino, ultime ore d'ossigeno

Quattromila persone sono al lavoro, alla ricerca affannosa del sottomarino argentino Ara San Juan, disperso da mercoledì scorso nell’Oceano atlantico. Secondo il quotidiano argentino el clarin, che riporta fonti non confermate dalla marina, nelle ultime ore sarebbe stato rilevato, anche da ricercatori americani, un oggetto nell’oceano, ma non si sa se sia il sottomarino. Fatto sta che è stata ampliata la zona delle ricerche, aiutate dal meteo. Gabriel Galeazzi, capitano della marina argentina, ha spiegato che le condiozioni meteorologiche migliorano e meno onde aumentano l’efficacia dei sensori, delle varie apparecchiature a disposizione. Ma se le condizioni del mare migliorano, il fattore tempo gioca a sfavore dell’equipaggio per cui il Paese prega: 44 persone che hanno riserve d’ossigeno per 7 giorni, ma ormai da sei il mezzo militare, partito nove giorni fa da Ushuaia e diretto a Mar del plata, non dà più cenni.

Paura per il sottomarino, ultime ore d'ossigeno

Paura per il sottomarino, ultime ore d'ossigenoQuattromila persone sono al lavoro, alla ricerca affannosa del sottomarino argentino Ara San Juan, disperso da mercoledì scorso nell’Oceano atlantico. Secondo il quotidiano argentino el clarin, che riporta fonti non confermate dalla marina, nelle ultime ore sarebbe stato rilevato, anche da ricercatori americani, un oggetto nell’oceano, ma non si sa se sia il sottomarino. Fatto sta che è stata ampliata la zona delle ricerche, aiutate dal meteo. Gabriel Galeazzi, capitano della marina argentina, ha spiegato che le condiozioni meteorologiche migliorano e meno onde aumentano l’efficacia dei sensori, delle varie apparecchiature a disposizione. Ma se le condizioni del mare migliorano, il fattore tempo gioca a sfavore dell’equipaggio per cui il Paese prega: 44 persone che hanno riserve d’ossigeno per 7 giorni, ma ormai da sei il mezzo militare, partito nove giorni fa da Ushuaia e diretto a Mar del plata, non dà più cenni.

Paura per il sottomarino, ultime ore d'ossigeno

Quattromila persone sono al lavoro, alla ricerca affannosa del sottomarino argentino Ara San Juan, disperso da mercoledì scorso nell’Oceano atlantico. Secondo il quotidiano argentino el clarin, che riporta fonti non confermate dalla marina, nelle ultime ore sarebbe stato rilevato, anche da ricercatori americani, un oggetto nell’oceano, ma non si sa se sia il sottomarino. Fatto sta che è stata ampliata la zona delle ricerche, aiutate dal meteo. Gabriel Galeazzi, capitano della marina argentina, ha spiegato che le condiozioni meteorologiche migliorano e meno onde aumentano l’efficacia dei sensori, delle varie apparecchiature a disposizione. Ma se le condizioni del mare migliorano, il fattore tempo gioca a sfavore dell’equipaggio per cui il Paese prega: 44 persone che hanno riserve d’ossigeno per 7 giorni, ma ormai da sei il mezzo militare, partito nove giorni fa da Ushuaia e diretto a Mar del plata, non dà più cenni.

Rescuers race against time to save Argentine submariners

Fears are continuing to grow over the fate of a missing Argentine submarine and its 44-member crew. The ARA San Juan disappeared last Wednesday in waters off Argentina’s eastern coast after reporting an electrical malfunction. The vessel was en route from Ushuaia, the world southern most city, to its base in Mar del Plata. It was about 480 km off the coast when it gave its last location. With every day that passes the situation becomes more critical as the vessel’s seven day oxygen supply will soon run out. However, officials say calmer seas have helped rescue crews in their search: “Waves are not at a height of two metres and as such we can maximize the use of the sensors of all the varied equipment that we have at our disposal,” explained naval commander Gabriel Galeazzi at an evening news conference in Mar de Plata. Wind speeds have slowed and waves that rose as high as eight metres at the weekend have diminished significantly. Argentina’s Navy releases another video reportedly shot from the destroyer ARA Sarandí that shows the poor weather conditions during the search and rescue operations of the submarine ARA San Juan. pic.twitter.com/dLyW99CfTG— Daniel Politi (@dpoliti) November 20, 2017 More than a dozen boats and plannes from Argentina, the United States, Britain, Chile and Brazil have joined the search. As a Royal Navy Submarine Veteran my thoughts and prayers are for my Brother Submariners onboard ARA San Juan pic.twitter.com/FrfCOLLE7M— John Rochford-Browne (@jrochfordbrowne) November 17, 2017 False dawn Also on Tuesday, authorities investigated white flares spotted in the South Atlantic overnight. Searchers found an empty floating raft, and noticed the flares from a distance. But the raft’s brand suggested it did not belong to the ARA San Juan, which was equipped with only red flares for emergencies and green flares for other situations, the navy said. Searchers have suffered other disappointments. Analysis of satellite signals and sounds detected by underwater probes, initially thought to be messages from the crew, has found they did not come from the vessel. “The sounds could be biological. We have discarded the possibility that it was a clanging of morse code against the hull of the submarine,” navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters in Buenos Aires.

Paura per il sottomarino, ultime ore d'ossigeno

Quattromila persone sono al lavoro, alla ricerca affannosa del sottomarino argentino Ara San Juan, disperso da mercoledì scorso nell’Oceano atlantico. Secondo il quotidiano argentino el clarin, che riporta fonti non confermate dalla marina, nelle ultime ore sarebbe stato rilevato, anche da ricercatori americani, un oggetto nell’oceano, ma non si sa se sia il sottomarino. Fatto sta che è stata ampliata la zona delle ricerche, aiutate dal meteo. Gabriel Galeazzi, capitano della marina argentina, ha spiegato che le condiozioni meteorologiche migliorano e meno onde aumentano l’efficacia dei sensori, delle varie apparecchiature a disposizione. Ma se le condizioni del mare migliorano, il fattore tempo gioca a sfavore dell’equipaggio per cui il Paese prega: 44 persone che hanno riserve d’ossigeno per 7 giorni, ma ormai da sei il mezzo militare, partito nove giorni fa da Ushuaia e diretto a Mar del plata, non dà più cenni.

Rescuers race against time to save Argentine submariners

Fears are continuing to grow over the fate of a missing Argentine submarine and its 44-member crew. The ARA San Juan disappeared last Wednesday in waters off Argentina’s eastern coast after reporting an electrical malfunction. The vessel was en route from Ushuaia, the world southern most city, to its base in Mar del Plata. It was about 480 km off the coast when it gave its last location. With every day that passes the situation becomes more critical as the vessel’s seven day oxygen supply will soon run out. However, officials say calmer seas have helped rescue crews in their search: “Waves are not at a height of two metres and as such we can maximize the use of the sensors of all the varied equipment that we have at our disposal,” explained naval commander Gabriel Galeazzi at an evening news conference in Mar de Plata. Wind speeds have slowed and waves that rose as high as eight metres at the weekend have diminished significantly. Argentina’s Navy releases another video reportedly shot from the destroyer ARA Sarandí that shows the poor weather conditions during the search and rescue operations of the submarine ARA San Juan. pic.twitter.com/dLyW99CfTG— Daniel Politi (@dpoliti) November 20, 2017 More than a dozen boats and plannes from Argentina, the United States, Britain, Chile and Brazil have joined the search. As a Royal Navy Submarine Veteran my thoughts and prayers are for my Brother Submariners onboard ARA San Juan pic.twitter.com/FrfCOLLE7M— John Rochford-Browne (@jrochfordbrowne) November 17, 2017 False dawn Also on Tuesday, authorities investigated white flares spotted in the South Atlantic overnight. Searchers found an empty floating raft, and noticed the flares from a distance. But the raft’s brand suggested it did not belong to the ARA San Juan, which was equipped with only red flares for emergencies and green flares for other situations, the navy said. Searchers have suffered other disappointments. Analysis of satellite signals and sounds detected by underwater probes, initially thought to be messages from the crew, has found they did not come from the vessel. “The sounds could be biological. We have discarded the possibility that it was a clanging of morse code against the hull of the submarine,” navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters in Buenos Aires.

Rescuers race against time to save Argentine submariners

Fears are continuing to grow over the fate of a missing Argentine submarine and its 44-member crew. The ARA San Juan disappeared last Wednesday in waters off Argentina’s eastern coast after reporting an electrical malfunction. The vessel was en route from Ushuaia, the world southern most city, to its base in Mar del Plata. It was about 480 km off the coast when it gave its last location. With every day that passes the situation becomes more critical as the vessel’s seven day oxygen supply will soon run out. However, officials say calmer seas have helped rescue crews in their search: “Waves are not at a height of two metres and as such we can maximize the use of the sensors of all the varied equipment that we have at our disposal,” explained naval commander Gabriel Galeazzi at an evening news conference in Mar de Plata. Wind speeds have slowed and waves that rose as high as eight metres at the weekend have diminished significantly. Argentina’s Navy releases another video reportedly shot from the destroyer ARA Sarandí that shows the poor weather conditions during the search and rescue operations of the submarine ARA San Juan. pic.twitter.com/dLyW99CfTG— Daniel Politi (@dpoliti) November 20, 2017 More than a dozen boats and plannes from Argentina, the United States, Britain, Chile and Brazil have joined the search. As a Royal Navy Submarine Veteran my thoughts and prayers are for my Brother Submariners onboard ARA San Juan pic.twitter.com/FrfCOLLE7M— John Rochford-Browne (@jrochfordbrowne) November 17, 2017 False dawn Also on Tuesday, authorities investigated white flares spotted in the South Atlantic overnight. Searchers found an empty floating raft, and noticed the flares from a distance. But the raft’s brand suggested it did not belong to the ARA San Juan, which was equipped with only red flares for emergencies and green flares for other situations, the navy said. Searchers have suffered other disappointments. Analysis of satellite signals and sounds detected by underwater probes, initially thought to be messages from the crew, has found they did not come from the vessel. “The sounds could be biological. We have discarded the possibility that it was a clanging of morse code against the hull of the submarine,” navy spokesman Enrique Balbi told reporters in Buenos Aires.

El vocero de la armada argentina, Gabriel Galeazzi, habla con la prensa hoy, martes 21 de noviembre de 2017, desde la Base Naval de Mar del Plata (Argentina). EFE

Argentina: Clock Ticking For 44 Missing Crew Members of Submarine ARA San Juan as Concerns Grow Over Lack of Oxygen

The submarine was going from a base in southern Tierra del Fuego to Mar del Plata-- its home base-- when it lost contact with the Navy. Its last recorded location was San Jorge Gulf. The captain of the vessel was directed to change course and return to Mar del Plata after he reported a short-circuit.

Argentina: Clock Ticking For 44 Missing Crew Members of Submarine ARA San Juan as Concerns Grow Over Lack of Oxygen

The submarine was going from a base in southern Tierra del Fuego to Mar del Plata-- its home base-- when it lost contact with the Navy. Its last recorded location was San Jorge Gulf. The captain of the vessel was directed to change course and return to Mar del Plata after he reported a short-circuit.

People wave to the Argentine destroyer "Sarandi" as it leaves a Navy base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, to participate in the search of the missing submarine, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The search continues for the missing submarine, with 44 crew members, that has been lost since Nov. 15 in the South Atlantic. (AP Photo/Marina Devo)

The Argentine destroyer Sarandi cruises by an empty beach in Mar del Plata, Argentina, as it heads out to join the search for a missing submarine, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The search continues for the missing submarine with 44 crew members that has been lost since Nov. 15 in the South Atlantic. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)

A woman wraps a rosary on the link of a fence blanketed with national flags in support of the crew members of the lost submarine, on the perimeters of the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The ARA San Juan Argentine submarine has been lost at sea last week with 44 crew members on board as it was on a voyage from the extreme southern port of Ushuaia to the city of Mar del Plata.(AP Photo/Vicente Robles)

A ribbon with the colors of the Argentine flag and a rosary hang from barbed wire outside a Navy base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The search continues for the missing submarine, with 44 crew members, that has been lost since Nov. 15 in the South Atlantic. (AP Photo/Marina Devo)

A ship's crew prepares for departure as part of the search and rescue mission of the submarine ARA San Juan at the naval base in Mar del Plata, Argentina, Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017. The search continues for the missing submarine with 44 crew members, that has been lost for six days in the South Atlantic. (AP Photo/Vicente Robles)