El Home Run Derby

El segunda base de los Yankees, Robinson Canó, se llevó los honores.

MLB Home Run Derby VR erscheint für Vive und PSVR
MLB Home Run Derby VR erscheint für Vive und PSVR
MLB Home Run Derby VR erscheint für Vive und PSVR
Major League Baseball has gotten into VR lately with a host of initiatives, including partnerships with Google for At Bat VR, Intel for "Game of the Week" live streams and Samsung for immersive highlights of the 2017 season.
MLB's 'Home Run Derby VR' is coming to PSVR and Vive this spring
Major League Baseball has gotten into VR lately with a host of initiatives, including partnerships with Google for At Bat VR, Intel for "Game of the Week" live streams and Samsung for immersive highlights of the 2017 season.
Major League Baseball has gotten into VR lately with a host of initiatives, including partnerships with Google for At Bat VR, Intel for "Game of the Week" live streams and Samsung for immersive highlights of the 2017 season.
MLB's 'Home Run Derby VR' is coming to PSVR and Vive this spring
Major League Baseball has gotten into VR lately with a host of initiatives, including partnerships with Google for At Bat VR, Intel for "Game of the Week" live streams and Samsung for immersive highlights of the 2017 season.
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
<p>Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson will report to Yankees spring training in Tampa, Fl. on Monday, but the team has said he will not appear in a game. </p><p>Wilson, who played two years of professional baseball in the Rockies organization after being selected in the fourth round of the 2010 draft, was <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/07/russell-wilson-yankees-trade-rangers-seahawks-quarterback" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:traded" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">traded</a> from the Rangers to the Yankees for future considerations on Feb. 7. Texas selected him in the 2013 rule 5 draft after he had emerged as a star NFL quarterback.</p><p>“Hey, New York City, I’m here, I got the Yankees hat on,” Wilson, 29, said in a video posted to his social media accounts. “And, hey, Aaron Judge, I know you want to throw some passes so let’s play some ball. We’ll see, we’ll have a little home run derby too. Stanton, I’m coming for you too. We’ll have some fun, baby. And, hey, let’s go win a World Series. Why not?”</p><p>Wilson has maintained that his focus is on football and that he does not plan to pursue baseball professionally at this time, but he hasn&#39;t ruled out the possibility of trying to be a two-sport athlete in the future. </p><p>The Yankees open their spring training exhibition slate on Friday with a game against the Tigers. </p>
Russell Wilson Will Report to Yankees Spring Training Monday, Won't Play in a Game

Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson will report to Yankees spring training in Tampa, Fl. on Monday, but the team has said he will not appear in a game.

Wilson, who played two years of professional baseball in the Rockies organization after being selected in the fourth round of the 2010 draft, was traded from the Rangers to the Yankees for future considerations on Feb. 7. Texas selected him in the 2013 rule 5 draft after he had emerged as a star NFL quarterback.

“Hey, New York City, I’m here, I got the Yankees hat on,” Wilson, 29, said in a video posted to his social media accounts. “And, hey, Aaron Judge, I know you want to throw some passes so let’s play some ball. We’ll see, we’ll have a little home run derby too. Stanton, I’m coming for you too. We’ll have some fun, baby. And, hey, let’s go win a World Series. Why not?”

Wilson has maintained that his focus is on football and that he does not plan to pursue baseball professionally at this time, but he hasn't ruled out the possibility of trying to be a two-sport athlete in the future.

The Yankees open their spring training exhibition slate on Friday with a game against the Tigers.

MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB launches virtual-reality Home Run Derby video game for consoles
MLB announced Thursday that it's making a virtual reality Home Run Derby video game for console gamers. (MLBAM)
Home Run Derby VR
MLB announced Thursday that it's making a virtual reality Home Run Derby video game for console gamers. (MLBAM)
MLB announced Thursday that it's making a virtual reality Home Run Derby video game for console gamers. (MLBAM)
Home Run Derby VR
MLB announced Thursday that it's making a virtual reality Home Run Derby video game for console gamers. (MLBAM)
<p>MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby</p>
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby

MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby

<p>MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby</p>
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby

MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby

Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it&#39;s launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it's launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it&#39;s launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it's launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it's launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it's launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it&#39;s launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
MLB lets fans swing for the fences in virtual reality Home Run Derby
Last season, MLB brought an experimental VR Home Run Derby game to special events and stadiums, this spring it's launching an console version for at-home gamers. (Video courtesy of MLBAM).
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Chukchansi Park hosts Jr. Home Run Derby
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Chukchansi Park hosts Jr. Home Run Derby
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Chukchansi Park hosts Jr. Home Run Derby
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
Chukchansi Park hosts Jr. Home Run Derby
Kids from across the Central Valley took a swing at the Jr. Home Run Derby Saturday at Chukchansi Park in Downtown Fresno.
<p>National Signing Day has arrived, and the top prospects who did not make use of the December signing period now have a decision to make. For fans of teams in championship contention, each recruiting cycle presents the possibility that one of the incoming blue-chip prospects will someday make the play that seals a national title. For everyone else, the first Wednesday in February offers an initial opportunity to commit to memory the unique names that may someday resurface in the biggest moment of the season. As <a href="https://www.si.com/college-football/2018/01/09/nick-saban-tua-tagovailoa-alabama-national-championship" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Tua Tagovailoa proved in Atlanta a month ago" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Tua Tagovailoa proved in Atlanta a month ago</a>, sometimes those two interests ultimately converge.</p><p>With thousands of new additions to college football rosters every year, it’s not surprising to find a steady stream of one-of-a-kind names worthy of our appreciation. So while everyone is congratulating the Georgias and Ohio States of the world on reeling in star-studded talent hauls, we’re celebrating the Kobe Buffalomeats, Lil’Jordan Humphreys and Munchie Legeauxs of the world (and their parents) for adding some memorable creativity to the sport’s central characters. We scanned 3,768 prospects and separated the (Tyrus) Wheat from the chaff to bring you this year’s best in the 2018 All-Name Team.</p><p><em>Author’s Note: To avoid any confusion, this post comes from a place of admiration and respect, not ridicule. As you may have guessed, the author’s own surname has long been the subject of casual observers’ fascination, so he sympathizes all too well with the positives and negatives of having a memorable one.</em></p><h3>Team Captains</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Habakkuk-Baldonado-46050707" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Habakkuk Baldonado" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Habakkuk Baldonado</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Zadock-Dinkelmann-45477" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Zadock Dinkelmann" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Zadock Dinkelmann</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Quindarious-Monday-89772" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Quindarious (Smoke) Monday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Quindarious (Smoke) Monday</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Bumper-Pool-86603" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Bumper Pool" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Bumper Pool</a></p><h3><a href="https://www.si.com/college-football/2017/02/02/kobe-buffalomeat-illinois-state" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Kobe Buffalomeat" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Kobe Buffalomeat</a> All-Stars</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Justice-Dingle-92178" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Justice Dingle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Justice Dingle</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Brandon-Shelnutt-91090" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Brandon Shelnutt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Brandon Shelnutt</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/YoHeinz-Tyler-86456" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Yo&#39;Heinz Tyler" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Yo&#39;Heinz Tyler</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jaylen-Pickle-46042529" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jaylen Pickle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jaylen Pickle</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Atrilleon-Williams-92257" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Atrilleon Williams" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Atrilleon Williams</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Georquarius-Spivey-46042686" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Geor&#39;quarius Spivey" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Geor&#39;quarius Spivey</a></p><h3>Action Movie Heroes Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Tank-Jenkins-80809" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Tank Jenkins" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Tank Jenkins</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Al-Blades-Jr-79872" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Al Blades Jr." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Al Blades Jr.</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Ricky-Slade-62537" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ricky Slade" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ricky Slade</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/JR-Justice-94538" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:J.R. Justice" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">J.R. Justice</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Tyler-Friday-86311" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Tyler Friday" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Tyler Friday</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jett-Johnson-46038506" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jett Johnson" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jett Johnson</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Legend-Moore-46038789" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Legend Moore" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Legend Moore</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Ace-Vick-46045354" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ace Vick" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ace Vick</a></p><h3>Action Movie Villains Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Shaun-Shivers-82856" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shaun Shivers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Shaun Shivers</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/John-Torchio-93207" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:John Torchio" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">John Torchio</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Slater-Zellers-46047988" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Slater Zellers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Slater Zellers</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Gatlin-Grisso-46041880" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gatlin Grisso" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Gatlin Grisso</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Mason-Quandt-46038833" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Mason Quandt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Mason Quandt</a></p><h3>National Signing Day Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Starrland-Baldwin-93990" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Starrland Baldwin" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Starrland Baldwin</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/player/t-j-pledger-81035" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:T.J. Pledger" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">T.J. Pledger</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Cameron-Rising-86414" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Cameron Rising" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Cameron Rising</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Connor-Pay-94518" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Connor Pay" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Connor Pay</a> [Only joking, of course!]</p><h3>Penguin Classics Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Alexandre-Dumais-46041232" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Alexandre Dumais" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Alexandre Dumais</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Micah-Baskerville-90833" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Micah Baskerville" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Micah Baskerville</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Hasaan-Hypolite-89535" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Hasaan Hypolite" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Hasaan Hypolite</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Aeneas-Hawkins-90760" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Aeneas Hawkins" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Aeneas Hawkins</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jordan-Redfearn-46047398" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jordan Redfearn" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jordan Redfearn</a></p><h3>Alternate Universe Home Run Derby Champion Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Aaron-Fudge-88084" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Aaron Fudge" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Aaron Fudge</a></p><h3>Yoknapatawpha County Residents Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Millard-Bradford-46038801" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Millard Bradford" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Millard Bradford</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Colson-Yankoff-78284" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Colson Yankoff" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Colson Yankoff</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Wyatt-Smock-46038059" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Wyatt Smock" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Wyatt Smock</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Reginald-Sutton-46038460" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Reginald Sutton" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Reginald Sutton</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Garland-LaFrance-84031" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Garland LaFrance" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Garland LaFrance</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/player/judge-culpepper-80655" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Judge Culpepper" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Judge Culpepper</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Hamp-Sisson-46047562" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Hamp Sisson" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Hamp Sisson</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Hamish-McClure-83909" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Hamish McClure" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Hamish McClure</a></p><h3>Eight-Time State Champion High School Wrestling Coach Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Rocky-Shelton-90558" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Rocky Shelton" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Rocky Shelton</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jack-Tuttle-90176" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jack Tuttle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jack Tuttle</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Blake-Whiteheart-46040322" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Blake Whiteheart" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Blake Whiteheart</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Dusty-Schramm-46047036" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Dusty Schramm" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Dusty Schramm</a></p><h3>Wonders of Nature Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Rachad-Wildgoose-Jr-46038370" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Rachad Wildgoose Jr." class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Rachad Wildgoose Jr.</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Trevor-Trout-76808" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Trevor Trout" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Trevor Trout</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Kavosiey-Smoke-87673" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Kavosiey Smoke" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Kavosiey Smoke</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Aaron-Frost-46043068" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Aaron Frost" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Aaron Frost</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Adam-Plant-89698" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Adam Plant" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Adam Plant</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Justin-Birdsong-46040048" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Justin Birdsong" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Justin Birdsong</a></p><h3>Too Beautiful to Categorize Division</h3><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Shocky-Jacques-Louis-93092" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Shocky Jacques-Louis" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Shocky Jacques-Louis</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Rocky-Jacques-Louis-45573137" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Rocky Jacques-Louis" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Rocky Jacques-Louis</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Fred-Billy-89753" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Fred Billy" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Fred Billy</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Knowledge-Smith-46040208" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Knowledge Smith" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Knowledge Smith</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/CBo-Flemister-46041028" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:C&#39;Bo Flemister" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">C&#39;Bo Flemister</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/El-Julian-Jordan-68840" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:El Julian Jordan" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">El Julian Jordan</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Dan-Land-III-91913" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Dan Land III" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Dan Land III</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Re-al-Mitchell-80248" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Re-al Mitchell" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Re-al Mitchell</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Gino-Appleberry-94580" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Gino Appleberry" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Gino Appleberry</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Quinshawn-Lucious-91669" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Quinshawn Lucious" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Quinshawn Lucious</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jax-Gasaway-45572607" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jax Gasaway" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jax Gasaway</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jeslord-Boateng-46036356" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jeslord Boateng" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jeslord Boateng</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Lyn-J-Dixon-85176" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Lyn-J Dixon" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Lyn-J Dixon</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Tennessee-Pututau-90836" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Tennessee Pututau" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Tennessee Pututau</a> [Not a Tennessee target]</p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Drake-Centers-94132" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Drake Centers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Drake Centers</a> (Position: offensive guard)</p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/William-Dunkle-46039778" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:William Dunkle" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">William Dunkle</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Jamall-Hickbottom-46040265" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jamall Hickbottom" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jamall Hickbottom</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/JaMari-Sweet-46035726" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Ja&#39;Mari Sweet" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Ja&#39;Mari Sweet</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Osorachukwu-Ifesinachukwu-46042778" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Osorachukwu Ifesinachukwu" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Osorachukwu Ifesinachukwu</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Carlton-Cleophat-46041406" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Carlton Cleophat" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Carlton Cleophat</a></p><p><a href="https://247sports.com/Player/Trey-Livingood-46039425" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Trey Livingood" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Trey Livingood</a></p>
2018 National Signing Day All-Name Team

National Signing Day has arrived, and the top prospects who did not make use of the December signing period now have a decision to make. For fans of teams in championship contention, each recruiting cycle presents the possibility that one of the incoming blue-chip prospects will someday make the play that seals a national title. For everyone else, the first Wednesday in February offers an initial opportunity to commit to memory the unique names that may someday resurface in the biggest moment of the season. As Tua Tagovailoa proved in Atlanta a month ago, sometimes those two interests ultimately converge.

With thousands of new additions to college football rosters every year, it’s not surprising to find a steady stream of one-of-a-kind names worthy of our appreciation. So while everyone is congratulating the Georgias and Ohio States of the world on reeling in star-studded talent hauls, we’re celebrating the Kobe Buffalomeats, Lil’Jordan Humphreys and Munchie Legeauxs of the world (and their parents) for adding some memorable creativity to the sport’s central characters. We scanned 3,768 prospects and separated the (Tyrus) Wheat from the chaff to bring you this year’s best in the 2018 All-Name Team.

Author’s Note: To avoid any confusion, this post comes from a place of admiration and respect, not ridicule. As you may have guessed, the author’s own surname has long been the subject of casual observers’ fascination, so he sympathizes all too well with the positives and negatives of having a memorable one.

Team Captains

Habakkuk Baldonado

Zadock Dinkelmann

Quindarious (Smoke) Monday

Bumper Pool

Kobe Buffalomeat All-Stars

Justice Dingle

Brandon Shelnutt

Yo'Heinz Tyler

Jaylen Pickle

Atrilleon Williams

Geor'quarius Spivey

Action Movie Heroes Division

Tank Jenkins

Al Blades Jr.

Ricky Slade

J.R. Justice

Tyler Friday

Jett Johnson

Legend Moore

Ace Vick

Action Movie Villains Division

Shaun Shivers

John Torchio

Slater Zellers

Gatlin Grisso

Mason Quandt

National Signing Day Division

Starrland Baldwin

T.J. Pledger

Cameron Rising

Connor Pay [Only joking, of course!]

Penguin Classics Division

Alexandre Dumais

Micah Baskerville

Hasaan Hypolite

Aeneas Hawkins

Jordan Redfearn

Alternate Universe Home Run Derby Champion Division

Aaron Fudge

Yoknapatawpha County Residents Division

Millard Bradford

Colson Yankoff

Wyatt Smock

Reginald Sutton

Garland LaFrance

Judge Culpepper

Hamp Sisson

Hamish McClure

Eight-Time State Champion High School Wrestling Coach Division

Rocky Shelton

Jack Tuttle

Blake Whiteheart

Dusty Schramm

Wonders of Nature Division

Rachad Wildgoose Jr.

Trevor Trout

Kavosiey Smoke

Aaron Frost

Adam Plant

Justin Birdsong

Too Beautiful to Categorize Division

Shocky Jacques-Louis

Rocky Jacques-Louis

Fred Billy

Knowledge Smith

C'Bo Flemister

El Julian Jordan

Dan Land III

Re-al Mitchell

Gino Appleberry

Quinshawn Lucious

Jax Gasaway

Jeslord Boateng

Lyn-J Dixon

Tennessee Pututau [Not a Tennessee target]

Drake Centers (Position: offensive guard)

William Dunkle

Jamall Hickbottom

Ja'Mari Sweet

Osorachukwu Ifesinachukwu

Carlton Cleophat

Trey Livingood

<p>It&#39;s not the icebreaking move that the frozen free agent market so desperately needs, but it may be a sign of things to come this month. Via <a href="https://twitter.com/Ken_Rosenthal/status/960690951982379009" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Athletic" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Athletic</a>&#39;s Ken Rosenthal, Todd Frazier has agreed to a two-year, $17 million deal with the Mets. From the standpoint of the soon-to-be 32-year-old third baseman, this is a steep discount that many other mid-market free agents may settle for as spring training approaches. For the Mets, this is a significant improvement at a low cost, one that strongly suggests they don&#39;t expect any contribution from David Wright, who didn&#39;t play at all last season.</p><p>Frazier split last season between the White Sox and the Yankees, who <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2017/07/19/todd-frazier-david-robertson-tommy-kahnle-yankees-white-sox-trade-yoan-moncada" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:acquired" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">acquired</a> him along with relievers Tommy Kahnle and David Robertson in a July 19 deal. The move was a homecoming for the slugging third baseman, who grew up in Toms River, New Jersey, where he led the Toms River East American team to victory in <a href="http://www.espn.com/video/clip?id=13256846" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the 1998 Little League World Series" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the 1998 Little League World Series</a>; in celebration of their championship, the team was introduced at Yankee Stadium before the national anthem, for which <a href="http://m.mlb.com/cutfour/2017/07/19/243043196/todd-frazier-traded-to-yankees-19-years-after-picture-with-derek-jeter" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Frazier stood next to" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Frazier stood next to</a> his pinstriped shortstop counterpart, Derek Jeter.</p><p>Though Frazier’s .213/.344/.428 batting line was hardly a knockout, his 27 homers and 83 walks pushed his OPS+ to 105, which ranked 21st of the 31 third baseman who made 300 plate appearances last year. That puts him in the general vicinity of Kyle Seager, Manny Machado (both 107) and Evan Longoria (100). Coupled with above-average defense (+8 Defensive Runs Saved, matching his career high), Frazier’s 3.4 WAR ranked well ahead of fellow free agent Mike Moustakas (1.8), who&#39;s three years younger and expected to command a much larger contract.</p><p>Ignore the batting average and Frazier&#39;s numbers also compare favorably to the .269/.315/.413 combined line of the eight players the Mets used at third base in 2017, with Wilmer Flores, Asdrubal Cabrera and Jose Reyes accounting for three-quarters of the playing time. That motley assortment was a gruesome 17 runs below average according to DRS, with Flores (-8) and Reyes (-5) the worst offenders. Baseball-Reference estimated that Mets third basemen were a combined 0.2 wins above replacement, mainly due to the hot bat of Cabrera once he agreed to shift over from second base; he finished the year with a modest 1.1 WAR, while Flores (-0.2 WAR) and Reyes (-0.6) were both underwater. If Frazier does nothing else but clean up that mess, he’s a solid three-win upgrade. </p><p>The 2017 season was the third year in a row that the Mets belatedly cobbled together a solution at third base, as Wright played a combined total of just 75 games in 2015-16. The 35-year-old Wright underwent rotator cuff surgery in September, and then lower back surgery in October. He&#39;s planning on attending spring training, but hasn&#39;t been cleared to resume baseball activities. Though he’s signed through 2020, his inactivity allows the Mets to recoup most of his salary via insurance.</p><p>Frazier made his major league debut in May 2011 and spent five seasons with the Reds, earning All-Star honors in the final two (2014-15). In 2015, after hitting 25 homers in the first half of the season, he won the Home Run Derby hosted in Cincinnati, but fell into a second-half slump and finished with 35 homers and a .255/.309/.498/117 OPS+ line. The Reds, who went into rebuilding mode soon after hosting the All-Star Game, dealt Frazier to the White Sox in December in a three-team, seven-player swap. In his lone full season on the South Side, Frazier set a career high with 40 homers but slipped to .225/.302/.464/107 OPS+.</p><p>?</p><p>As I <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/01/19/free-agent-market-jd-martinez-eric-hosmer-jake-arrieta-yu-darvish" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:noted" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">noted</a> last month, Frazier&#39;s slash line has been brought down by three straight seasons of declining batting averages on balls in play, from .309 in 2014 to .226 in &#39;17. Even so, he does enough other things well to give him considerable value. He was worth 4.0 WAR in 2015 and 3.4 in &#39;16; his three-year total of 10.8 is ninth at a talent-laden position, behind Josh Donaldson, Kris Bryant, Noaln Arenado, Machado, Adrian Beltre, Justin Turner, Seager and Jose Ramirez.</p><p>With a solid track record like that, a free agent such as Frazier could have been expected to net a three- or four-year deal in winters past. Taking him through a quick spin in my <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/01/08/lorenzo-cain-free-agency-value" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:What&#39;s He Really Worth" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">What&#39;s He Really Worth</a> model, which incorporates a player&#39;s last three years of performance, a projection of his future value, and estimates of the market cost for a win, the rate of inflation and an age-related decline, I get valuations of $49.9 million over three yeas using the low-end estimate of $9 million per win, and $58.3 million using the high-end estimate of $10.5 million per win. FanGraphs&#39; <a href="https://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/2018-top-50-free-agents/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Dave Cameron" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Dave Cameron</a> estimated Frazier would get a three-year, $42 million contract, while <a href="https://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2017/11/2017-18-top-50-mlb-free-agents-with-predictions.html" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:MLB Trade Rumors" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">MLB Trade Rumors</a> predicted he&#39;d land a three-year, $33 million deal.</p><p>For Frazier to get just over half that is a blow, considering that he earned $12 million last year, his final year of arbitration eligibility. Consider that in December, 32-year-old former Reds teammate Zack Cozart, who played shortstop alongside Frazier regularly from 2012-15, netted a three-year, $39 million deal to play third base for the Angels; he&#39;s produced 8.9 WAR over the past three seasons. In January, the Mets re-signed 31-year-old rightfielder Jay Bruce, who’s been worth just 4.2 WAR over the past three seasons despite hitting 95 home runs in that span, to a three-year, $39 million deal. Frazier quite rightly should have come away with at least that much instead of the reported $17 million pact.</p><p>Apparently, there&#39;s a hometown discount to factor in as Frazier was said to enjoy his time with the Yankees. The team valued both his production and his clubhouse presence, but their efforts to get under the $197 million competitive balance tax threshold limited their pursuit of Frazier. Via FanRag&#39;s <a href="https://twitter.com/JonHeyman/status/960693176821534720" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Jon Heyman" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Jon Heyman</a>, Frazier &quot;made clear he wanted to be in NY.&quot; Still, this rates as particularly eye opening given that Frazier is represented by agent Brodie Van Wagenen, who last Friday <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/02/free-agent-market-owners-collusion-brodie-van-wagenen" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:expressed frustration" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">expressed frustration</a> on behalf of players, suggesting that this winter&#39;s free agent inactivity &quot;feels coordinated,&quot; that &quot;the algorithms that have helped determine player salaries in recent years are suggesting dramatically higher values than owners appear willing to spend&quot; (ahem), and that &quot;a fight is brewing.&quot; Van Wagenen suggested that players might boycott spring training as a protest against the status quo.</p><p>Obviously, Frazier is one player who&#39;s not spoiling for a fight, and he may be part of a wave of free agents who settle for what’s out there just in time to pack for spring training. While his signing won&#39;t turn the Mets into contenders by itself, he&#39;s a legitimate upgrade to a lineup whose other additions — the return of Bruce and the addition of first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, whose 2017 season was wrecked by back woes — look rather meek. There’s a lot more <a href="https://www.si.com/mlb/2018/02/05/new-york-mets-playoff-contender" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:the Mets could and should do" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">the Mets could and should do</a> to return to contention after a dismal 70-92 season, but this is a step in the right direction. </p>
Todd Frazier Settles for Discounted Contract With Mets, and There May Be More to Come

It's not the icebreaking move that the frozen free agent market so desperately needs, but it may be a sign of things to come this month. Via The Athletic's Ken Rosenthal, Todd Frazier has agreed to a two-year, $17 million deal with the Mets. From the standpoint of the soon-to-be 32-year-old third baseman, this is a steep discount that many other mid-market free agents may settle for as spring training approaches. For the Mets, this is a significant improvement at a low cost, one that strongly suggests they don't expect any contribution from David Wright, who didn't play at all last season.

Frazier split last season between the White Sox and the Yankees, who acquired him along with relievers Tommy Kahnle and David Robertson in a July 19 deal. The move was a homecoming for the slugging third baseman, who grew up in Toms River, New Jersey, where he led the Toms River East American team to victory in the 1998 Little League World Series; in celebration of their championship, the team was introduced at Yankee Stadium before the national anthem, for which Frazier stood next to his pinstriped shortstop counterpart, Derek Jeter.

Though Frazier’s .213/.344/.428 batting line was hardly a knockout, his 27 homers and 83 walks pushed his OPS+ to 105, which ranked 21st of the 31 third baseman who made 300 plate appearances last year. That puts him in the general vicinity of Kyle Seager, Manny Machado (both 107) and Evan Longoria (100). Coupled with above-average defense (+8 Defensive Runs Saved, matching his career high), Frazier’s 3.4 WAR ranked well ahead of fellow free agent Mike Moustakas (1.8), who's three years younger and expected to command a much larger contract.

Ignore the batting average and Frazier's numbers also compare favorably to the .269/.315/.413 combined line of the eight players the Mets used at third base in 2017, with Wilmer Flores, Asdrubal Cabrera and Jose Reyes accounting for three-quarters of the playing time. That motley assortment was a gruesome 17 runs below average according to DRS, with Flores (-8) and Reyes (-5) the worst offenders. Baseball-Reference estimated that Mets third basemen were a combined 0.2 wins above replacement, mainly due to the hot bat of Cabrera once he agreed to shift over from second base; he finished the year with a modest 1.1 WAR, while Flores (-0.2 WAR) and Reyes (-0.6) were both underwater. If Frazier does nothing else but clean up that mess, he’s a solid three-win upgrade.

The 2017 season was the third year in a row that the Mets belatedly cobbled together a solution at third base, as Wright played a combined total of just 75 games in 2015-16. The 35-year-old Wright underwent rotator cuff surgery in September, and then lower back surgery in October. He's planning on attending spring training, but hasn't been cleared to resume baseball activities. Though he’s signed through 2020, his inactivity allows the Mets to recoup most of his salary via insurance.

Frazier made his major league debut in May 2011 and spent five seasons with the Reds, earning All-Star honors in the final two (2014-15). In 2015, after hitting 25 homers in the first half of the season, he won the Home Run Derby hosted in Cincinnati, but fell into a second-half slump and finished with 35 homers and a .255/.309/.498/117 OPS+ line. The Reds, who went into rebuilding mode soon after hosting the All-Star Game, dealt Frazier to the White Sox in December in a three-team, seven-player swap. In his lone full season on the South Side, Frazier set a career high with 40 homers but slipped to .225/.302/.464/107 OPS+.

?

As I noted last month, Frazier's slash line has been brought down by three straight seasons of declining batting averages on balls in play, from .309 in 2014 to .226 in '17. Even so, he does enough other things well to give him considerable value. He was worth 4.0 WAR in 2015 and 3.4 in '16; his three-year total of 10.8 is ninth at a talent-laden position, behind Josh Donaldson, Kris Bryant, Noaln Arenado, Machado, Adrian Beltre, Justin Turner, Seager and Jose Ramirez.

With a solid track record like that, a free agent such as Frazier could have been expected to net a three- or four-year deal in winters past. Taking him through a quick spin in my What's He Really Worth model, which incorporates a player's last three years of performance, a projection of his future value, and estimates of the market cost for a win, the rate of inflation and an age-related decline, I get valuations of $49.9 million over three yeas using the low-end estimate of $9 million per win, and $58.3 million using the high-end estimate of $10.5 million per win. FanGraphs' Dave Cameron estimated Frazier would get a three-year, $42 million contract, while MLB Trade Rumors predicted he'd land a three-year, $33 million deal.

For Frazier to get just over half that is a blow, considering that he earned $12 million last year, his final year of arbitration eligibility. Consider that in December, 32-year-old former Reds teammate Zack Cozart, who played shortstop alongside Frazier regularly from 2012-15, netted a three-year, $39 million deal to play third base for the Angels; he's produced 8.9 WAR over the past three seasons. In January, the Mets re-signed 31-year-old rightfielder Jay Bruce, who’s been worth just 4.2 WAR over the past three seasons despite hitting 95 home runs in that span, to a three-year, $39 million deal. Frazier quite rightly should have come away with at least that much instead of the reported $17 million pact.

Apparently, there's a hometown discount to factor in as Frazier was said to enjoy his time with the Yankees. The team valued both his production and his clubhouse presence, but their efforts to get under the $197 million competitive balance tax threshold limited their pursuit of Frazier. Via FanRag's Jon Heyman, Frazier "made clear he wanted to be in NY." Still, this rates as particularly eye opening given that Frazier is represented by agent Brodie Van Wagenen, who last Friday expressed frustration on behalf of players, suggesting that this winter's free agent inactivity "feels coordinated," that "the algorithms that have helped determine player salaries in recent years are suggesting dramatically higher values than owners appear willing to spend" (ahem), and that "a fight is brewing." Van Wagenen suggested that players might boycott spring training as a protest against the status quo.

Obviously, Frazier is one player who's not spoiling for a fight, and he may be part of a wave of free agents who settle for what’s out there just in time to pack for spring training. While his signing won't turn the Mets into contenders by itself, he's a legitimate upgrade to a lineup whose other additions — the return of Bruce and the addition of first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, whose 2017 season was wrecked by back woes — look rather meek. There’s a lot more the Mets could and should do to return to contention after a dismal 70-92 season, but this is a step in the right direction.

<p><strong>Tom Verducci:</strong> Jay Bruce. The market for power hitters has cratered because home runs are so prevalent. Three years ago Bruce would have been looking at a four- or five-year deal. (Think Curtis Granderson: four years, $60 million.) Now he could be had for about $39 million over three years. That’s a good value for someone who can hit in the middle of an order, play good defense in the outfield or at first base.</p><p><strong>Jay Jaffe: </strong>Lance Lynn. You don&#39;t hear him being talked about as a potential $100 million pitcher, but in a winter where Darvish and Jake Arrieta are the only two top-tier pitchers, the going-on-31-year-old righty is worth a closer look. Despite missing all of 2016 due to Tommy John surgery, he&#39;s proven durable, making 31 or more starts in every other year since 2013, posting a 3.30 ERA (118 ERA+) and 3.7 FIP with 8.2 strikeouts per nine and a decent groundball rate.</p><p><strong>Stephanie Apstein: </strong>Is it cheating to say Shohei Ohtani?</p><p><strong>Jack Dickey: </strong>Todd Frazier. While his best days may be behind him, he managed to post a .344 OBP and 27 homers while splitting time between the White Sox and Yankees last year. He’s a useful player, not a complete one, which often leads to a lack of free-agent appreciation. He’d make a fine signing for either New York team.?</p><p><strong>Jon Tayler: </strong>In years previous, a lefthanded slugger who hit 38 home runs and set full-season career highs in on-base and slugging percentage would set the free-agent market (or at least his agent’s cellphone) on fire. That likely hasn’t been the case for Logan Morrison, though, who will have to wait for Hosmer to find a home before teams come calling despite his brilliant 2017 season (135 OPS+, 3.6 WAR, one ill-conceived war of words over the home run derby with Gary Sanchez). And with front offices increasingly wary of giving big bucks to first basemen no matter how much power they provide, one team could find itself landing Morrison for relative peanuts—especially compared to the haul Hosmer is going to get.?</p><p><strong>Gabriel Baumgaertner: </strong>All Carlos Santana does is hit. He&#39;s forever been underappreciated. He may be a bit limited defensively, but he&#39;ll stabilize any lineup that needs an effective contact hitter with good power.</p><p><strong>Connor Grossman: </strong>Eduardo Nuñez isn’t going to be dirt cheap, but given his versatility and relatively solid season at the plate last year he’s a good fit on almost any team. Nuñez took off after getting traded from the Giants to the Red Sox, nearly hitting .400 in his first 10 games and equaling his home run total (four) that he had in his first 76 game in San Francisco.</p><p>He should have no shortage of suitors, but that being said, he’s not going to command the salary of a superstar. He just has a knack for moonlighting as one occasionally. </p>
Which Free Agent Will be the Best Bargain?

Tom Verducci: Jay Bruce. The market for power hitters has cratered because home runs are so prevalent. Three years ago Bruce would have been looking at a four- or five-year deal. (Think Curtis Granderson: four years, $60 million.) Now he could be had for about $39 million over three years. That’s a good value for someone who can hit in the middle of an order, play good defense in the outfield or at first base.

Jay Jaffe: Lance Lynn. You don't hear him being talked about as a potential $100 million pitcher, but in a winter where Darvish and Jake Arrieta are the only two top-tier pitchers, the going-on-31-year-old righty is worth a closer look. Despite missing all of 2016 due to Tommy John surgery, he's proven durable, making 31 or more starts in every other year since 2013, posting a 3.30 ERA (118 ERA+) and 3.7 FIP with 8.2 strikeouts per nine and a decent groundball rate.

Stephanie Apstein: Is it cheating to say Shohei Ohtani?

Jack Dickey: Todd Frazier. While his best days may be behind him, he managed to post a .344 OBP and 27 homers while splitting time between the White Sox and Yankees last year. He’s a useful player, not a complete one, which often leads to a lack of free-agent appreciation. He’d make a fine signing for either New York team.?

Jon Tayler: In years previous, a lefthanded slugger who hit 38 home runs and set full-season career highs in on-base and slugging percentage would set the free-agent market (or at least his agent’s cellphone) on fire. That likely hasn’t been the case for Logan Morrison, though, who will have to wait for Hosmer to find a home before teams come calling despite his brilliant 2017 season (135 OPS+, 3.6 WAR, one ill-conceived war of words over the home run derby with Gary Sanchez). And with front offices increasingly wary of giving big bucks to first basemen no matter how much power they provide, one team could find itself landing Morrison for relative peanuts—especially compared to the haul Hosmer is going to get.?

Gabriel Baumgaertner: All Carlos Santana does is hit. He's forever been underappreciated. He may be a bit limited defensively, but he'll stabilize any lineup that needs an effective contact hitter with good power.

Connor Grossman: Eduardo Nuñez isn’t going to be dirt cheap, but given his versatility and relatively solid season at the plate last year he’s a good fit on almost any team. Nuñez took off after getting traded from the Giants to the Red Sox, nearly hitting .400 in his first 10 games and equaling his home run total (four) that he had in his first 76 game in San Francisco.

He should have no shortage of suitors, but that being said, he’s not going to command the salary of a superstar. He just has a knack for moonlighting as one occasionally.

<p>No surprise here: The American League and National League Rookie of the Year Awards went to sluggers Aaron Judge and Cody Bellinger. </p><p>Both players were unanimous choices, landing on the top of all 30 ballots. </p><p><a href="http://m.mlb.com/news/article/261130518/aaron-judge-cody-bellinger-sure-to-be-roy/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Only three previous times have both leagues’ Rookie of the Year been awarded unanimously" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Only three previous times have both leagues’ Rookie of the Year been awarded unanimously</a>: Benito Santiago and Mark McGwire in 1987, Mike Piazza and Tim Salmon in 1993 and Scott Rolen and Nomar Garciaparra in 1997.</p><p>Judge, 25, is also a finalist for the AL MVP (which will be announced Thursday) after leading the AL in home runs with 52. He also had the most runs scored (128) and walks drawn (127) in the AL, while striking out a major-league high 208 times. The 52 homers broke Mark McGwire’s 1987 mark (49) for dingers by a rookie. </p><p>Unlike Judge, Bellinger didn’t start the season in the majors. But once he was called up on April 25, Bellinger proved to be one of the best hitters in the NL. He hit .267 with 39 homers, 97 RBIs and .933 OPS.</p><p>In a fun coincidence, Judge and Bellinger squared off in the Home Run Derby in July, with Judge eliminating Bellinger in the semi-finals en route to becoming the first rookie to ever win the competition. </p><p>Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi and Orioles outfielder Trey Mancini were the other finalists in the AL. Bellinger beat out Pirates first baseman Josh Bell and Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong. </p>
Aaron Judge and Cody Bellinger Unanimously Win Rookie of the Year Awards

No surprise here: The American League and National League Rookie of the Year Awards went to sluggers Aaron Judge and Cody Bellinger.

Both players were unanimous choices, landing on the top of all 30 ballots.

Only three previous times have both leagues’ Rookie of the Year been awarded unanimously: Benito Santiago and Mark McGwire in 1987, Mike Piazza and Tim Salmon in 1993 and Scott Rolen and Nomar Garciaparra in 1997.

Judge, 25, is also a finalist for the AL MVP (which will be announced Thursday) after leading the AL in home runs with 52. He also had the most runs scored (128) and walks drawn (127) in the AL, while striking out a major-league high 208 times. The 52 homers broke Mark McGwire’s 1987 mark (49) for dingers by a rookie.

Unlike Judge, Bellinger didn’t start the season in the majors. But once he was called up on April 25, Bellinger proved to be one of the best hitters in the NL. He hit .267 with 39 homers, 97 RBIs and .933 OPS.

In a fun coincidence, Judge and Bellinger squared off in the Home Run Derby in July, with Judge eliminating Bellinger in the semi-finals en route to becoming the first rookie to ever win the competition.

Red Sox outfielder Andrew Benintendi and Orioles outfielder Trey Mancini were the other finalists in the AL. Bellinger beat out Pirates first baseman Josh Bell and Cardinals shortstop Paul DeJong.

<p>In what will pass as shocking news if you didn&#39;t watch any baseball this season, Cody Bellinger is your National League Rookie of the Year. Such can be expected when you hit 39 home runs and post a .267/.352/.581 line as a 22-year-old and also help your team win its division and its first pennant since 1989 as part of a terrific World Series run. Fun fact: It took Cody just 43 games to pass his dad Clay in career home runs. In your face, dad!</p><p>Given that Bellinger is just 22 years old and that the Dodgers are a factory of success, expect to see a whole lot more of him and his whip-like swing over the next decade or so. But before we look ahead to 2018 and all the rest of those seasons, let&#39;s look back on Bellinger&#39;s 2017 campaign, when he came out of the minors as a fully-formed dinger god and clubbed some real good homers (and also hit for the cycle, because why not).</p><p>Bellinger&#39;s first career home run (and his second, from the same game):</p><p>Bellinger takes Andrew Miller (!) deep:</p><p>Bellinger homers twice in the first two innings against the Mets:</p><p>Bellinger goes deep for the 10th time in 10 games (please note Kiké Hernandez&#39;s reaction):</p><p>Bellinger clobbers a 446-foot homer in the Home Run Derby:</p><p>Bellinger hits for the cycle against the Marlins:</p><p>Bellinger breaks the Dodgers&#39; franchise record for single-season homers by a rookie:</p><p>Bellinger does it all in NLDS Game 3 against the Diamondbacks:</p><p>Bellinger&#39;s game-winning double in Game 4 of the World Series:</p><p>Kudos on the big year, Cody. It should be fun to see what next year holds.</p>
Cody Bellinger's Best Moments From His Rookie of the Year-Winning Season

In what will pass as shocking news if you didn't watch any baseball this season, Cody Bellinger is your National League Rookie of the Year. Such can be expected when you hit 39 home runs and post a .267/.352/.581 line as a 22-year-old and also help your team win its division and its first pennant since 1989 as part of a terrific World Series run. Fun fact: It took Cody just 43 games to pass his dad Clay in career home runs. In your face, dad!

Given that Bellinger is just 22 years old and that the Dodgers are a factory of success, expect to see a whole lot more of him and his whip-like swing over the next decade or so. But before we look ahead to 2018 and all the rest of those seasons, let's look back on Bellinger's 2017 campaign, when he came out of the minors as a fully-formed dinger god and clubbed some real good homers (and also hit for the cycle, because why not).

Bellinger's first career home run (and his second, from the same game):

Bellinger takes Andrew Miller (!) deep:

Bellinger homers twice in the first two innings against the Mets:

Bellinger goes deep for the 10th time in 10 games (please note Kiké Hernandez's reaction):

Bellinger clobbers a 446-foot homer in the Home Run Derby:

Bellinger hits for the cycle against the Marlins:

Bellinger breaks the Dodgers' franchise record for single-season homers by a rookie:

Bellinger does it all in NLDS Game 3 against the Diamondbacks:

Bellinger's game-winning double in Game 4 of the World Series:

Kudos on the big year, Cody. It should be fun to see what next year holds.

<p>Aaron Judge, the beefy man-tree who plays rightfield for the Yankees, is your American League Rookie of the Year for 2017. If this is a surprise to you, it&#39;s probably because you went into a coma in late March and didn&#39;t come out of it until just now. Judge wasn&#39;t just the best freshman in this year&#39;s AL crop; he was arguably the league&#39;s best player overall (a debate that will be settled on Thursday when the BBWAA announces its AL MVP from a group of Judge, Jose Altuve and Jose Ramirez).</p><p>It was a season beyond belief for Judge, who cranked 52 home runs to go with an absurd .284/.422/.627 line, including an AL-high 127 walks (and an MLB-high 208 strikeouts), and was an integral part of a Yankees team that was supposed to be amid a rebuilding phase but instead won 91 games and came within a game of winning the pennant against the eventual World Series champion Astros. It&#39;s nice when things finally go New York&#39;s way.</p><p>There will likely be far more to come from Judge as his career continues, but let&#39;s take this moment to look back on the best moments from the giant metallic demi-god who came down from Mount Olympus and launched baseballs all over these United States (and Toronto). And by &quot;best moments,&quot; I mean all the jaw-dropping bombs he blasted. This post is best read while listening to something loud and bombastic—maybe &quot;Immigrant Song,&quot; or &quot;The 1812 Overture.&quot; Enjoy!</p><p>Judge goes very deep in Seattle:</p><p>Judge crushes a third-deck homer against the Mets:</p><p>Judge goes 495 feet against the Orioles:</p><p>Judge&#39;s four 500-foot Home Run Derby homers:</p><p>Judge reaches the flagpoles in Yankee Stadium&#39;s leftfield with a 448-foot homer against the White Sox:</p><p>Judge makes a tumbling catch at Fenway (on his birthday, no less):</p><p>Judge breaks Mark McGwire&#39;s single-season rookie home run record with his 50th of the year:</p><p>Judge rips a line-drive homer in the AL wild-card game against the Twins:</p><p>Judge robs Francisco Lindor of a homer in ALDS Game 3 and owns Zack Hample in the process:</p><p>Judge makes a wall-crashing catch in the ALCS:</p><p>So there you have it: the year in Judge. Tune back next year for more of the same, most likely.</p>
Aaron Judge's Best Moments From His Rookie of the Year-Winning Season

Aaron Judge, the beefy man-tree who plays rightfield for the Yankees, is your American League Rookie of the Year for 2017. If this is a surprise to you, it's probably because you went into a coma in late March and didn't come out of it until just now. Judge wasn't just the best freshman in this year's AL crop; he was arguably the league's best player overall (a debate that will be settled on Thursday when the BBWAA announces its AL MVP from a group of Judge, Jose Altuve and Jose Ramirez).

It was a season beyond belief for Judge, who cranked 52 home runs to go with an absurd .284/.422/.627 line, including an AL-high 127 walks (and an MLB-high 208 strikeouts), and was an integral part of a Yankees team that was supposed to be amid a rebuilding phase but instead won 91 games and came within a game of winning the pennant against the eventual World Series champion Astros. It's nice when things finally go New York's way.

There will likely be far more to come from Judge as his career continues, but let's take this moment to look back on the best moments from the giant metallic demi-god who came down from Mount Olympus and launched baseballs all over these United States (and Toronto). And by "best moments," I mean all the jaw-dropping bombs he blasted. This post is best read while listening to something loud and bombastic—maybe "Immigrant Song," or "The 1812 Overture." Enjoy!

Judge goes very deep in Seattle:

Judge crushes a third-deck homer against the Mets:

Judge goes 495 feet against the Orioles:

Judge's four 500-foot Home Run Derby homers:

Judge reaches the flagpoles in Yankee Stadium's leftfield with a 448-foot homer against the White Sox:

Judge makes a tumbling catch at Fenway (on his birthday, no less):

Judge breaks Mark McGwire's single-season rookie home run record with his 50th of the year:

Judge rips a line-drive homer in the AL wild-card game against the Twins:

Judge robs Francisco Lindor of a homer in ALDS Game 3 and owns Zack Hample in the process:

Judge makes a wall-crashing catch in the ALCS:

So there you have it: the year in Judge. Tune back next year for more of the same, most likely.

<p>Roy Halladay #32 of the Toronto Blue Jays sits with this kids before the State Farm Home Run Derby at the Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York on July 14, 2008. (Photo by Rich Pilling/MLB Photos via Getty Images) </p>
Roy Halliday

Roy Halladay #32 of the Toronto Blue Jays sits with this kids before the State Farm Home Run Derby at the Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, New York on July 14, 2008. (Photo by Rich Pilling/MLB Photos via Getty Images)

<p>After the home run derby took over the World Series again, it&#39;s tough to deny that something is different about the baseballs.&#160;&#160;</p>
Juiced baseballs? Another World Series HR derby raises more questions

After the home run derby took over the World Series again, it's tough to deny that something is different about the baseballs.  

<p>Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night.&#160;</p> <p>A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don&#39;t always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/dodgers-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history</a></p></div> <p>Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.</p> <p>Some of the homers would&#39;ve been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro&#39;s Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day.&#160;</p>  <p>Houston Astros&#39; George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.</p><div><p>Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock</p></div><p>The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/23/california-heat-wave-santa-ana-winds-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak</a> in California.&#160;</p> <p>In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn&#39;t just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game &#8212; it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, <a href="http://www.alexlamers.com/2013/09/25/mlb-playoffs-first-pitch-temperatures/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:according to meteorologist Alex Lamers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">according to meteorologist Alex Lamers</a>.&#160;</p> <p>On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn&#39;t just a record for that region: It was also likely the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/10/25/southern-california-stews-in-most-extreme-heat-nation-has-ever-seen-so-late-in-year/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hottest temperature ever observed" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hottest temperature ever observed</a> in the U.S. this late in the year.&#160;</p> <p>Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect.&#160;</p> <div><div><blockquote> <p>MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.<br><br>Wow. <a href="https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo</a></p> <p>&#8212; FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) <a href="https://twitter.com/MLBONFOX/status/923388550933913600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:October 26, 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">October 26, 2017</a></p> </blockquote></div></div> <p>According to <a href="http://m.mlb.com/news/article/259362594/hot-temps-could-affect-world-series-game-1/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:mlb.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">mlb.com</a>, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. &quot;Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest,&quot; wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.</p> <p>Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night&#39;s.&#160;</p> <p>The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don&#39;t expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.</p> <p>Then again, with these two teams, you never know...&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/wes-anderson-theme-airbnb/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
Extreme heat may have led to record number of home runs in Game 2 of the World Series

Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night. 

A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don't always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air. 

Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.

Some of the homers would've been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro's Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day. 

Houston Astros' George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak in California. 

In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn't just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game — it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, according to meteorologist Alex Lamers

On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn't just a record for that region: It was also likely the hottest temperature ever observed in the U.S. this late in the year. 

Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect. 

MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.

Wow. https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo

— FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) October 26, 2017

According to mlb.com, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. "Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest," wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.

Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night's. 

The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don't expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.

Then again, with these two teams, you never know... 

<p>Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night.&#160;</p> <p>A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don&#39;t always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/dodgers-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history</a></p></div> <p>Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.</p> <p>Some of the homers would&#39;ve been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro&#39;s Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day.&#160;</p>  <p>Houston Astros&#39; George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.</p><div><p>Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock</p></div><p>The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/23/california-heat-wave-santa-ana-winds-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak</a> in California.&#160;</p> <p>In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn&#39;t just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game &#8212; it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, <a href="http://www.alexlamers.com/2013/09/25/mlb-playoffs-first-pitch-temperatures/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:according to meteorologist Alex Lamers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">according to meteorologist Alex Lamers</a>.&#160;</p> <p>On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn&#39;t just a record for that region: It was also likely the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/10/25/southern-california-stews-in-most-extreme-heat-nation-has-ever-seen-so-late-in-year/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hottest temperature ever observed" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hottest temperature ever observed</a> in the U.S. this late in the year.&#160;</p> <p>Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect.&#160;</p> <div><div><blockquote> <p>MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.<br><br>Wow. <a href="https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo</a></p> <p>&#8212; FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) <a href="https://twitter.com/MLBONFOX/status/923388550933913600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:October 26, 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">October 26, 2017</a></p> </blockquote></div></div> <p>According to <a href="http://m.mlb.com/news/article/259362594/hot-temps-could-affect-world-series-game-1/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:mlb.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">mlb.com</a>, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. &quot;Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest,&quot; wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.</p> <p>Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night&#39;s.&#160;</p> <p>The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don&#39;t expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.</p> <p>Then again, with these two teams, you never know...&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/wes-anderson-theme-airbnb/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
Extreme heat may have led to record number of home runs in Game 2 of the World Series

Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night. 

A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don't always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air. 

Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.

Some of the homers would've been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro's Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day. 

Houston Astros' George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak in California. 

In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn't just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game — it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, according to meteorologist Alex Lamers

On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn't just a record for that region: It was also likely the hottest temperature ever observed in the U.S. this late in the year. 

Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect. 

MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.

Wow. https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo

— FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) October 26, 2017

According to mlb.com, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. "Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest," wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.

Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night's. 

The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don't expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.

Then again, with these two teams, you never know... 

<p>Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night.&#160;</p> <p>A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don&#39;t always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air.&#160;</p> <div><p>SEE ALSO: <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/dodgers-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">The Dodgers just won the hottest World Series game in history</a></p></div> <p>Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.</p> <p>Some of the homers would&#39;ve been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro&#39;s Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day.&#160;</p>  <p>Houston Astros&#39; George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.</p><div><p>Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock</p></div><p>The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an <a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/23/california-heat-wave-santa-ana-winds-hottest-world-series-game/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak</a> in California.&#160;</p> <p>In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn&#39;t just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game &#8212; it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, <a href="http://www.alexlamers.com/2013/09/25/mlb-playoffs-first-pitch-temperatures/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:according to meteorologist Alex Lamers" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">according to meteorologist Alex Lamers</a>.&#160;</p> <p>On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn&#39;t just a record for that region: It was also likely the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/capital-weather-gang/wp/2017/10/25/southern-california-stews-in-most-extreme-heat-nation-has-ever-seen-so-late-in-year/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:hottest temperature ever observed" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">hottest temperature ever observed</a> in the U.S. this late in the year.&#160;</p> <p>Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect.&#160;</p> <div><div><blockquote> <p>MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.<br><br>Wow. <a href="https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo</a></p> <p>&#8212; FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) <a href="https://twitter.com/MLBONFOX/status/923388550933913600?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:October 26, 2017" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">October 26, 2017</a></p> </blockquote></div></div> <p>According to <a href="http://m.mlb.com/news/article/259362594/hot-temps-could-affect-world-series-game-1/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:mlb.com" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">mlb.com</a>, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. &quot;Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest,&quot; wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.</p> <p>Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night&#39;s.&#160;</p> <p>The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don&#39;t expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.</p> <p>Then again, with these two teams, you never know...&#160;</p> <div> <h2><a href="http://mashable.com/2017/10/24/wes-anderson-theme-airbnb/?utm_campaign=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full&#38;utm_cid=Mash-BD-Synd-Yahoo-Science-Full" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">WATCH: This Airbnb is straight out of a Wes Anderson movie</a></h2> <div>  </div> </div>
Extreme heat may have led to record number of home runs in Game 2 of the World Series

Record heat may partly be to blame for the bizarre, historic, and exciting second game of the World Series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Houston Astros on Wednesday night. 

A record-setting 8 home runs were hit during the course of 11 innings of play. Games with higher temperatures tend to, but don't always result in, a greater number of home runs, since higher temperatures allow balls to fly a bit farther than they would in colder, denser air. 

Game Two, which the Astros eventually won, had a starting temperature of 93 degrees Fahrenheit, making it one of the hottest postseason games in the history of the sport. A brush fire was burning within sight of Dodgers stadium, a testament to the extremely hot, dry, and windy conditions at game time.

Some of the homers would've been hit out of the park no matter what the temperature was. However, others, particularly the tying home run by the Astro's Marwin Gonzalez in the 9th inning, might have fallen short of the wall on a cooler day. 

Houston Astros' George Springer celebrates after hitting a two-run home run.

Image: AP/REX/Shutterstock

The first two games of the 2017 World Series took place during an unusual late season heat wave and wildfire outbreak in California. 

In fact, Game One set an all-time high temperature milestone, with a first pitch temperature of 103 degrees Fahrenheit. This didn't just break the previous record for the hottest postseason game — it shattered it. The previous hottest postseason game had a temperature of 94 degrees at first pitch, and it took place in Phoenix in 2001, according to meteorologist Alex Lamers

On Tuesday, high temperatures reached a record-setting 108 degrees Fahrenheit in parts of southern California, which wasn't just a record for that region: It was also likely the hottest temperature ever observed in the U.S. this late in the year. 

Meteorologists and baseball fans have long known that, all things being equal, hot weather is associated with higher scoring games. Extreme heat can help make the difference between a line drive and a shallow home run, since higher temperatures allow balls to travel slightly farther. Cold temperatures, on the other hand, can slightly inhibit home runs. Statistics from games during 2017 show this temperature effect. 

MARWIN IN THE 9TH! TIE GAME.

Wow. https://t.co/A4HwUOHNZo

— FOX Sports: MLB (@MLBONFOX) October 26, 2017

According to mlb.com, major league teams tend to hit better and score more runs during hotter games. "Just 3.1 percent of at-bats ended in a home run at the coldest temperatures; 4.4 percent did at the warmest," wrote MLB columnist Mike Petriello on Oct. 24, comparing games that took place across a range of temperatures.

Given the increased likelihood of more severe and long-lasting heat waves around the world, stemming from human-caused global warming, we might need to get used to games like Wednesday night's. 

The World Series now goes to Houston, where temperatures are cooler, and a domed stadium means the climate will be more controlled. In other words, don't expect another topsy turvy home run derby of a game to occur.

Then again, with these two teams, you never know... 

<p>By now the story is familiar: the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, a fourth-round 2013 draft pick, wasn&#39;t expected to make more than a late-season contribution to the Dodgers in 2017, having barely grazed Triple A by late 2016. A slew of injuries led to an April 25 call-up, around 11 weeks before his 22nd birthday, and he wound up doing nothing less than setting an NL rookie record for homers, participating in the Home Run Derby and supplanting Adrian Gonzalez (who missed most of the season due to a herniated disc in his lower back) at first base. He&#39;s a lock to win NL Rookie of the Year honors.</p><p>With an uppercut swing that produced a higher fly ball rate than any Dodger besides Justin Turner, Bellinger has excellent bat speed and tremendous power, mostly to his pull side. He&#39;s a disciplined hitter who battles deep into counts, an approach that makes him vulnerable to strikeouts (his 26.6% ranked second among Dodger regulars), though his 11.1% walk rate is certainly respectable. He&#39;s plenty lethal against lefties (.271/.335/.568 with 12 homers in 173 PA), so don&#39;t expect him to be particularly targeted by situational matchups. An athleticism that would play in centerfield shows up all around his game; he&#39;s a decent baserunner who stole 10 bases in 13 attempts, and an above-average fielder at first base (+2 DRS in 93 games) who has made several outstanding plays during the postseason.</p><p>The overlooked piece in Houston’s homegrown infield, Gurriel—a superstar in his native Cuba who wasn’t able to leave the country until two years ago at the age of 31—is making up for lost time. After a so-so regular season, he’s exploded in the playoffs, hitting .366/.409/.512 in 44 plate appearances. A free-swinger of the highest order, Gurriel walked only 22 times in 564 trips to the plate in 2017, but his contact-oriented approach and natural power have made him an invaluable part of the middle of Houston’s order. Defensively, he’s just about average, but the Astros will take that given his hot bat.</p><p><strong>Edge: Dodgers</strong></p>
First Base: Cody Bellinger vs. Yulieski Gurriel

By now the story is familiar: the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, a fourth-round 2013 draft pick, wasn't expected to make more than a late-season contribution to the Dodgers in 2017, having barely grazed Triple A by late 2016. A slew of injuries led to an April 25 call-up, around 11 weeks before his 22nd birthday, and he wound up doing nothing less than setting an NL rookie record for homers, participating in the Home Run Derby and supplanting Adrian Gonzalez (who missed most of the season due to a herniated disc in his lower back) at first base. He's a lock to win NL Rookie of the Year honors.

With an uppercut swing that produced a higher fly ball rate than any Dodger besides Justin Turner, Bellinger has excellent bat speed and tremendous power, mostly to his pull side. He's a disciplined hitter who battles deep into counts, an approach that makes him vulnerable to strikeouts (his 26.6% ranked second among Dodger regulars), though his 11.1% walk rate is certainly respectable. He's plenty lethal against lefties (.271/.335/.568 with 12 homers in 173 PA), so don't expect him to be particularly targeted by situational matchups. An athleticism that would play in centerfield shows up all around his game; he's a decent baserunner who stole 10 bases in 13 attempts, and an above-average fielder at first base (+2 DRS in 93 games) who has made several outstanding plays during the postseason.

The overlooked piece in Houston’s homegrown infield, Gurriel—a superstar in his native Cuba who wasn’t able to leave the country until two years ago at the age of 31—is making up for lost time. After a so-so regular season, he’s exploded in the playoffs, hitting .366/.409/.512 in 44 plate appearances. A free-swinger of the highest order, Gurriel walked only 22 times in 564 trips to the plate in 2017, but his contact-oriented approach and natural power have made him an invaluable part of the middle of Houston’s order. Defensively, he’s just about average, but the Astros will take that given his hot bat.

Edge: Dodgers

<p>By now the story is familiar: the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, a fourth-round 2013 draft pick, wasn&#39;t expected to make more than a late-season contribution to the Dodgers in 2017, having barely grazed Triple A by late 2016. A slew of injuries led to an April 25 call-up, around 11 weeks before his 22nd birthday, and he wound up doing nothing less than setting an NL rookie record with 39 homers, participating in the Home Run Derby and supplanting Adrian Gonzalez (who missed most of the season due to a herniated disc in his lower back) at first base. He&#39;s a lock to win NL Rookie of the Year honors.</p><p>With an uppercut swing that produced a higher fly ball rate than any Dodger besides Justin Turner, Bellinger has excellent bat speed and tremendous power, mostly to his pull side. He&#39;s a disciplined hitter who battles deep into counts, an approach that makes him vulnerable to strikeouts (his 26.6% ranked second among Dodger regulars), though his 11.1% walk rate is certainly respectable. He&#39;s plenty lethal against lefties (.271/.335/.568 with 12 homers in 173 PA), so don&#39;t expect him to be particularly targeted by situational matchups. An athleticism that would play in centerfield shows up all around his game; he&#39;s a decent baserunner who stole 10 bases in 13 attempts, and an above-average fielder at first base (+2 DRS in 93 games) who has made several outstanding plays during the postseason.</p><p>The overlooked piece in Houston’s homegrown infield, Gurriel—a superstar in his native Cuba who wasn’t able to leave the country until two years ago at the age of 31—is making up for lost time. After a so-so regular season, he’s exploded in the playoffs, hitting .366/.409/.512 in 44 plate appearances. A free-swinger of the highest order, Gurriel walked only 22 times in 564 trips to the plate in 2017, but his contact-oriented approach and natural power have made him an invaluable part of the middle of Houston’s order. Defensively, he’s just about average, but the Astros will take that given his hot bat.</p><p><strong>Edge: Dodgers</strong></p>
First Base: Cody Bellinger vs. Yulieski Gurriel

By now the story is familiar: the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, a fourth-round 2013 draft pick, wasn't expected to make more than a late-season contribution to the Dodgers in 2017, having barely grazed Triple A by late 2016. A slew of injuries led to an April 25 call-up, around 11 weeks before his 22nd birthday, and he wound up doing nothing less than setting an NL rookie record with 39 homers, participating in the Home Run Derby and supplanting Adrian Gonzalez (who missed most of the season due to a herniated disc in his lower back) at first base. He's a lock to win NL Rookie of the Year honors.

With an uppercut swing that produced a higher fly ball rate than any Dodger besides Justin Turner, Bellinger has excellent bat speed and tremendous power, mostly to his pull side. He's a disciplined hitter who battles deep into counts, an approach that makes him vulnerable to strikeouts (his 26.6% ranked second among Dodger regulars), though his 11.1% walk rate is certainly respectable. He's plenty lethal against lefties (.271/.335/.568 with 12 homers in 173 PA), so don't expect him to be particularly targeted by situational matchups. An athleticism that would play in centerfield shows up all around his game; he's a decent baserunner who stole 10 bases in 13 attempts, and an above-average fielder at first base (+2 DRS in 93 games) who has made several outstanding plays during the postseason.

The overlooked piece in Houston’s homegrown infield, Gurriel—a superstar in his native Cuba who wasn’t able to leave the country until two years ago at the age of 31—is making up for lost time. After a so-so regular season, he’s exploded in the playoffs, hitting .366/.409/.512 in 44 plate appearances. A free-swinger of the highest order, Gurriel walked only 22 times in 564 trips to the plate in 2017, but his contact-oriented approach and natural power have made him an invaluable part of the middle of Houston’s order. Defensively, he’s just about average, but the Astros will take that given his hot bat.

Edge: Dodgers

<p>NEW YORK — Beer cups rained down from the grandstand level. Popcorn flew toward the heavens. The Yankees’ baby faced assassin had returned, and his re-emergence was given a proper celebration.</p><p>For some of the season, at least, Gary Sanchez was the Yankees’ best hitter. He played in just 122 games, missing time due to a biceps strain, but still managed to slug 33 home runs. Twelve of them came in August, when the Yankees’ offense was trying to survive Aaron Judge’s miserable slump. Even for part of June, when Judge established himself as one of the league’s most formidable hitters, Sanchez somehow burned even hotter.</p><p>For some of the postseason, though, he’d been the worst Yankee at the plate, entering Game 4 of the ALCS hitless in his last 18 at-bats. On Monday night, he watched as Judge finally broke through off Astros pitching. On Tuesday, it was his turn. </p><p>Sanchez awakened his slumbering bat in the Yankees’ 6–4 win on Tuesday night, driving in three with hard-hit balls to right in consecutive innings. The first, a liner into the glove of Josh Reddick, brought Didi Gregorius home from third to cut Houston’s lead to two in the seventh. The second, a two-run double hammered into the gap at 113 mph, put the Yankees ahead for two. In a postseason where the Yankees’ youngest have shone bright, Sanchez finally had his moment.</p><p>“Emotions are raw,” Sanchez said through his translator. “You’re standing on second base and can’t even control them.”</p><p>On most other teams, Sanchez would be the main attraction. He blends his massive power with steady contact at the plate, something that’s becoming increasingly rare in an age where strikeouts are accepted as a product of gaudy home run numbers. Yet in New York, a 6’7” shadow was cast over his brightest moments.</p><p>When he hit nine homers in June, Judge hit 10. When he made waves around the league by slugging 12 in August, Judge hit 15 in September. Even when he knocked Giancarlo Stanton out of the Home Run Derby with 17 homers, Judge hit 23. For most of the season, Sanchez’s production has come rather quietly, but he made a big splash on Tuesday.</p><p>Sanchez’s arrival to the ALCS only makes this Yankees lineup—one that scored eight in a Game 3 win—even scarier to the Astros, who are suddenly slipping. For the most part, Judge and Sanchez haven’t had hot streaks at the plate at the same time. The only period of the season which they did, in June, the Yankees scored a season-best 177 runs.</p><p>“It can only mean more exciting things to come,” Todd Frazier said of Sanchez’s night. “I’m pretty excited.”</p><p>Just as quickly as their bats abandoned the Yankees—Judge’s after a blistering hot September, and Sanchez’s after a solid start to October—they’ve returned. The Yankees were practically out of this series after six and a half innings on Tuesday. Now, with Sanchez in on the fun, they suddenly look like they may be the favorites against Dallas Keuchel in Game 5.</p>
Gary Sanchez Adds Another Dimension to Yankees' Postseason Power

NEW YORK — Beer cups rained down from the grandstand level. Popcorn flew toward the heavens. The Yankees’ baby faced assassin had returned, and his re-emergence was given a proper celebration.

For some of the season, at least, Gary Sanchez was the Yankees’ best hitter. He played in just 122 games, missing time due to a biceps strain, but still managed to slug 33 home runs. Twelve of them came in August, when the Yankees’ offense was trying to survive Aaron Judge’s miserable slump. Even for part of June, when Judge established himself as one of the league’s most formidable hitters, Sanchez somehow burned even hotter.

For some of the postseason, though, he’d been the worst Yankee at the plate, entering Game 4 of the ALCS hitless in his last 18 at-bats. On Monday night, he watched as Judge finally broke through off Astros pitching. On Tuesday, it was his turn.

Sanchez awakened his slumbering bat in the Yankees’ 6–4 win on Tuesday night, driving in three with hard-hit balls to right in consecutive innings. The first, a liner into the glove of Josh Reddick, brought Didi Gregorius home from third to cut Houston’s lead to two in the seventh. The second, a two-run double hammered into the gap at 113 mph, put the Yankees ahead for two. In a postseason where the Yankees’ youngest have shone bright, Sanchez finally had his moment.

“Emotions are raw,” Sanchez said through his translator. “You’re standing on second base and can’t even control them.”

On most other teams, Sanchez would be the main attraction. He blends his massive power with steady contact at the plate, something that’s becoming increasingly rare in an age where strikeouts are accepted as a product of gaudy home run numbers. Yet in New York, a 6’7” shadow was cast over his brightest moments.

When he hit nine homers in June, Judge hit 10. When he made waves around the league by slugging 12 in August, Judge hit 15 in September. Even when he knocked Giancarlo Stanton out of the Home Run Derby with 17 homers, Judge hit 23. For most of the season, Sanchez’s production has come rather quietly, but he made a big splash on Tuesday.

Sanchez’s arrival to the ALCS only makes this Yankees lineup—one that scored eight in a Game 3 win—even scarier to the Astros, who are suddenly slipping. For the most part, Judge and Sanchez haven’t had hot streaks at the plate at the same time. The only period of the season which they did, in June, the Yankees scored a season-best 177 runs.

“It can only mean more exciting things to come,” Todd Frazier said of Sanchez’s night. “I’m pretty excited.”

Just as quickly as their bats abandoned the Yankees—Judge’s after a blistering hot September, and Sanchez’s after a solid start to October—they’ve returned. The Yankees were practically out of this series after six and a half innings on Tuesday. Now, with Sanchez in on the fun, they suddenly look like they may be the favorites against Dallas Keuchel in Game 5.

<p>NEW YORK — Beer cups rained down from the grandstand level. Popcorn flew toward the heavens. The Yankees’ baby faced assassin had returned, and his re-emergence was given a proper celebration.</p><p>For some of the season, at least, Gary Sanchez was the Yankees’ best hitter. He played in just 122 games, missing time due to a biceps strain, but still managed to slug 33 home runs. Twelve of them came in August, when the Yankees’ offense was trying to survive Aaron Judge’s miserable slump. Even for part of June, when Judge established himself as one of the league’s most formidable hitters, Sanchez somehow burned even hotter.</p><p>For some of the postseason, though, he’d been the worst Yankee at the plate, entering Game 4 of the ALCS hitless in his last 18 at-bats. On Monday night, he watched as Judge finally broke through off Astros pitching. On Tuesday, it was his turn. </p><p>Sanchez awakened his slumbering bat in the Yankees’ 6–4 win on Tuesday night, driving in three with hard-hit balls to right in consecutive innings. The first, a liner into the glove of Josh Reddick, brought Didi Gregorius home from third to cut Houston’s lead to two in the seventh. The second, a two-run double hammered into the gap at 113 mph, put the Yankees ahead for two. In a postseason where the Yankees’ youngest have shone bright, Sanchez finally had his moment.</p><p>“Emotions are raw,” Sanchez said through his translator. “You’re standing on second base and can’t even control them.”</p><p>On most other teams, Sanchez would be the main attraction. He blends his massive power with steady contact at the plate, something that’s becoming increasingly rare in an age where strikeouts are accepted as a product of gaudy home run numbers. Yet in New York, a 6’7” shadow was cast over his brightest moments.</p><p>When he hit nine homers in June, Judge hit 10. When he made waves around the league by slugging 12 in August, Judge hit 15 in September. Even when he knocked Giancarlo Stanton out of the Home Run Derby with 17 homers, Judge hit 23. For most of the season, Sanchez’s production has come rather quietly, but he made a big splash on Tuesday.</p><p>Sanchez’s arrival to the ALCS only makes this Yankees lineup—one that scored eight in a Game 3 win—even scarier to the Astros, who are suddenly slipping. For the most part, Judge and Sanchez haven’t had hot streaks at the plate at the same time. The only period of the season which they did, in June, the Yankees scored a season-best 177 runs.</p><p>“It can only mean more exciting things to come,” Todd Frazier said of Sanchez’s night. “I’m pretty excited.”</p><p>Just as quickly as their bats abandoned the Yankees—Judge’s after a blistering hot September, and Sanchez’s after a solid start to October—they’ve returned. The Yankees were practically out of this series after six and a half innings on Tuesday. Now, with Sanchez in on the fun, they suddenly look like they may be the favorites against Dallas Keuchel in Game 5.</p>
Gary Sanchez Adds Another Dimension to Yankees' Postseason Power

NEW YORK — Beer cups rained down from the grandstand level. Popcorn flew toward the heavens. The Yankees’ baby faced assassin had returned, and his re-emergence was given a proper celebration.

For some of the season, at least, Gary Sanchez was the Yankees’ best hitter. He played in just 122 games, missing time due to a biceps strain, but still managed to slug 33 home runs. Twelve of them came in August, when the Yankees’ offense was trying to survive Aaron Judge’s miserable slump. Even for part of June, when Judge established himself as one of the league’s most formidable hitters, Sanchez somehow burned even hotter.

For some of the postseason, though, he’d been the worst Yankee at the plate, entering Game 4 of the ALCS hitless in his last 18 at-bats. On Monday night, he watched as Judge finally broke through off Astros pitching. On Tuesday, it was his turn.

Sanchez awakened his slumbering bat in the Yankees’ 6–4 win on Tuesday night, driving in three with hard-hit balls to right in consecutive innings. The first, a liner into the glove of Josh Reddick, brought Didi Gregorius home from third to cut Houston’s lead to two in the seventh. The second, a two-run double hammered into the gap at 113 mph, put the Yankees ahead for two. In a postseason where the Yankees’ youngest have shone bright, Sanchez finally had his moment.

“Emotions are raw,” Sanchez said through his translator. “You’re standing on second base and can’t even control them.”

On most other teams, Sanchez would be the main attraction. He blends his massive power with steady contact at the plate, something that’s becoming increasingly rare in an age where strikeouts are accepted as a product of gaudy home run numbers. Yet in New York, a 6’7” shadow was cast over his brightest moments.

When he hit nine homers in June, Judge hit 10. When he made waves around the league by slugging 12 in August, Judge hit 15 in September. Even when he knocked Giancarlo Stanton out of the Home Run Derby with 17 homers, Judge hit 23. For most of the season, Sanchez’s production has come rather quietly, but he made a big splash on Tuesday.

Sanchez’s arrival to the ALCS only makes this Yankees lineup—one that scored eight in a Game 3 win—even scarier to the Astros, who are suddenly slipping. For the most part, Judge and Sanchez haven’t had hot streaks at the plate at the same time. The only period of the season which they did, in June, the Yankees scored a season-best 177 runs.

“It can only mean more exciting things to come,” Todd Frazier said of Sanchez’s night. “I’m pretty excited.”

Just as quickly as their bats abandoned the Yankees—Judge’s after a blistering hot September, and Sanchez’s after a solid start to October—they’ve returned. The Yankees were practically out of this series after six and a half innings on Tuesday. Now, with Sanchez in on the fun, they suddenly look like they may be the favorites against Dallas Keuchel in Game 5.

<p>The Dodgers swept the Diamondbacks out of the Division Series with a 3-1 victory at Chase Field on Monday night. Deadline acquisition Yu Darvish gave the Dodgers just what they had hoped for when they acquired him from the Rangers on July 31, outdueling Zack Greinke, who battled to keep the Diamondbacks in the game despite having less than his best stuff.</p><p>The Dodgers will move onto the National League Championship Series for the second year in a row under manager Dave Roberts, and the third out of five overall. They’ll await the winner of the Cubs-Nationals series in their attempt to reach the World Series for the first time since 1988. </p><p><strong>1. The Kid from Chandler</strong></p><p>Through his first two postseason games, Cody Bellinger had shown very little of the form that produced an NL rookie record 39 homers and a .267/.352/.581 line. While the rest of his teammates went a combined 23-for-62 (.370), the 22-year-old slugger had gone just 1-for-10 with six strikeouts, though his lone hit came in the Dodgers’ four-run first inning in Game 1, and he reached on an error during a three-run fourth-inning rally that night as well. He played good defense in both games as well, but he’d yet to break out.</p><p>He did so on Monday night as the series shifted to Arizona—his home turf, as he grew up in the Phoenix suburb of Chandler, the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, now a <a href="http://www.espn.com/mlb/story/_/id/19910240/qa-clay-bellinger-dad-dodgers-phenom-cody" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:firefighter" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">firefighter</a> and his son’s Home Run Derby pitcher. The younger Bellinger put the Dodgers on the board in the first with an RBI groundout that brought in Chris Taylor, who’d ripped a 109 mph leadoff double off Greinke. With two outs in the fifth, Bellinger got ahead 3-0, took a borderline inside fastball, then launched a changeup that caught too much of the plate for a 416-foot drive to left centerfield, extending the Dodgers’ lead to 2-0.</p><p>Bellinger’s homer was just the Dodgers’ second of the series, after Justin Turner’s three-run shot in Game 1. Within the next inning, both the DIamondbacks’ Daniel Descalso and the Dodges’ Austin Barnes also added solo homers, but Arizona still held a 7-3 edge in that department this series.</p><p>Bellinger flashed the leather on Monday night, too. After Descalso trimmed the lead to 2-1 via a solo homer off Darvish, who had been virtually unhittable to that point, the first baseman tumbled over the railing of the Dodgers&#39; dugout to snag a foul ball off the bat of Jeff Mathis. Fortunately, he was able to brace his fall with a little help from his friends:</p><p>In the sixth, as Darvish departed after hitting pinch-hitter Christian Walker on the helmet, Bellinger made an excellent throw to avoid the runner on a 3-6-3 double play off the bat of David Peralta. He immediately followed that with a diving stop of a Ketel Marte smash, throwing to Brandon Morrow covering first base for the third out. In all, it was a big night on both sides of the ball for the kid in front of his hometown crowd.</p><p><strong>2. Something about Yu</strong></p><p>By the numbers, Darvish didn’t have a great season, going 10-12 with a 3.86 ERA (118 ERA+) and 3.83 FIP in 186 2/3 innings split between the Rangers and Dodgers, who acquired him in a July 31 deadline blockbuster. Still, he struck out 208 hitters, and largely stayed healthy. Over his last three starts, he was simply brilliant, whiffing 21 and allowing just two runs (one earned) in 19 ? innings—the payoff of a <a href="http://beta.latimes.com/sports/dodgers/la-sp-dodgers-darvish-mets-20170804-story.htm" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:simplified approach and mechanical changes" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">simplified approach and mechanical changes</a> that the Dodgers worked with him to implement after acquiring him.</p><p>?</p><p>The payoff continued on Monday night, as he was utterly dominant. While Greinke slogged through five-plus frames, Darvish whizzed through his. He needed just 30 pitches to get through three innings, including a seven-pitch third that give his opposite number, who grounded out in that stretch, almost no time to sit down. Until Descalso homered in the fifth, the Diamondbacks’ only baserunner came via a first-inning bunt single by Marte, and none of the 18 hitters he faced got to a three-ball count.</p><p>After a 20-pitch fifth, by far his most laborious inning of the night, Darvish’s pitch count was at 68 when Roberts let him bat with one out and a man on third in the top of the sixth, but after nearly hitting Walker once (a review confirmed the call that it was a foul ball), he did hit him on the very next pitch, which produced a scary moment. Between the two delays, Roberts must have decided that he’d gotten enough from his 31-year-old righty and turned things over to the bullpen.</p><p>In all, Darvish struck out seven and generated 15 swings and misses. Via Brooks Baseball, he threw six different types of pitches, but just one curve and one changeup. He dialed his four-seam fastball as high as 97.8 mph, averaging 95.2 and generating 11 strikes from among the 14 he threw, three of them swings and misses. He was also was tremendously efficient with his slider (27 pitches, 21 strikes, five swings and misses), and his cutter (21 pitches, 15 strikes, four swings and misses); the latter was a pitch the Dodgers <a href="https://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/what-the-dodgers-asked-yu-to-do/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:encouraged him to emphasize" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">encouraged him to emphasize</a>.</p><p>After Darvish exited, Robert used Tony Cingrani (two outs), Brandon Morrow (four outs), Kenta Maeda and Jansen (three outs apiece) to finish off the Diamondbacks, and for the first time in the series, the Dodgers’ bullpen didn’t allow a run. Peralta’s one-out ninth-inning single off Jansen was the only baserunner they allowed while striking out four. Fittingly, Jansen struck out Paul Goldschmidt, the Dodgers’ top nemesis, on a 95 mph cutter outside to end the game and the series.</p><p>For the series, the Dodgers bullpen allowed four runs (three earned) in 11 ? innings, with a 10/1 strikeout-to-walk ratio.</p><p><strong>Grinding Greinke</strong></p><p>After a rough first season in Arizona in 2016, Greinke ranked among the NL’s top half-dozen hurlers in several key categories including ERA (3.20, sixth) and WAR (6.0, fourth), but he couldn’t get out of the fourth inning in the NL Wild Card Game. Even after four days of rest following his 58-pitch outing, the 33-year-old righty was anything but sharp in Game 3, though he did his best to keep the Diamondbacks in the game.</p><p>The trouble began when Taylor smoked that leadoff double into the leftfield corner on Greinke’s sixth pitch. Corey Seager followed with a seven pitch walk, and then Taylor advanced on via Justin Turner’s short fly ball and Bellinger’s grounder to first, with Paul Goldschmidt expecting to throw home but misstepping and missing first base on his first attempt. Greinke needed 29 pitches to complete the first inning thanks to a 10-pitch plate appearance by Yasiel Puig.</p><p>The 33-year-old righty burned another 25 pitches in the second inning, thanks in part to an eight-pitch walk by Chase Utley and a pesky six-pitch at-bat by Darvish, who struck out. Greinke loaded the bases in the third via a pair of walks and a Turner single. But despite walking five hitters and needing 88 pitches to get through the first four innings, he kept the score at 1-0.</p><p>Just when he put together his most impressive sequence of the night, getting Seager on a first-pitch flyball and Turner on a four-pitch strikeout to start the fifth, Greinke fell behind Bellinger 3-0, and then KABOOM.</p><p>After the Descalso homer cut the score to 2-1, Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo was ready to pinch-hit for his ace in the fifth, but Bellinger’s play on Mathis left the pitcher in the leadoff position to start the sixth. On Greinke’s second pitch of the sixth, he served up an 89 mph fastball that Barnes lined 398 feet to leftfield, restoring their two-run lead.</p><p>That ended Greinke’s night at 104 pitches, of which just five were swings and misses. While the Arizona bullpen turned in four scoreless innings, 2 ? by setup man Archie Bradley, the damage had been done. Poor Fernando Rodney, the Diamondbacks closer, not only never got to fire a single arrow, he never even got to pitch in the series.</p>
Cody Bellinger Lifts Dodgers to Third NLCS in Five Seasons

The Dodgers swept the Diamondbacks out of the Division Series with a 3-1 victory at Chase Field on Monday night. Deadline acquisition Yu Darvish gave the Dodgers just what they had hoped for when they acquired him from the Rangers on July 31, outdueling Zack Greinke, who battled to keep the Diamondbacks in the game despite having less than his best stuff.

The Dodgers will move onto the National League Championship Series for the second year in a row under manager Dave Roberts, and the third out of five overall. They’ll await the winner of the Cubs-Nationals series in their attempt to reach the World Series for the first time since 1988.

1. The Kid from Chandler

Through his first two postseason games, Cody Bellinger had shown very little of the form that produced an NL rookie record 39 homers and a .267/.352/.581 line. While the rest of his teammates went a combined 23-for-62 (.370), the 22-year-old slugger had gone just 1-for-10 with six strikeouts, though his lone hit came in the Dodgers’ four-run first inning in Game 1, and he reached on an error during a three-run fourth-inning rally that night as well. He played good defense in both games as well, but he’d yet to break out.

He did so on Monday night as the series shifted to Arizona—his home turf, as he grew up in the Phoenix suburb of Chandler, the son of former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, now a firefighter and his son’s Home Run Derby pitcher. The younger Bellinger put the Dodgers on the board in the first with an RBI groundout that brought in Chris Taylor, who’d ripped a 109 mph leadoff double off Greinke. With two outs in the fifth, Bellinger got ahead 3-0, took a borderline inside fastball, then launched a changeup that caught too much of the plate for a 416-foot drive to left centerfield, extending the Dodgers’ lead to 2-0.

Bellinger’s homer was just the Dodgers’ second of the series, after Justin Turner’s three-run shot in Game 1. Within the next inning, both the DIamondbacks’ Daniel Descalso and the Dodges’ Austin Barnes also added solo homers, but Arizona still held a 7-3 edge in that department this series.

Bellinger flashed the leather on Monday night, too. After Descalso trimmed the lead to 2-1 via a solo homer off Darvish, who had been virtually unhittable to that point, the first baseman tumbled over the railing of the Dodgers' dugout to snag a foul ball off the bat of Jeff Mathis. Fortunately, he was able to brace his fall with a little help from his friends:

In the sixth, as Darvish departed after hitting pinch-hitter Christian Walker on the helmet, Bellinger made an excellent throw to avoid the runner on a 3-6-3 double play off the bat of David Peralta. He immediately followed that with a diving stop of a Ketel Marte smash, throwing to Brandon Morrow covering first base for the third out. In all, it was a big night on both sides of the ball for the kid in front of his hometown crowd.

2. Something about Yu

By the numbers, Darvish didn’t have a great season, going 10-12 with a 3.86 ERA (118 ERA+) and 3.83 FIP in 186 2/3 innings split between the Rangers and Dodgers, who acquired him in a July 31 deadline blockbuster. Still, he struck out 208 hitters, and largely stayed healthy. Over his last three starts, he was simply brilliant, whiffing 21 and allowing just two runs (one earned) in 19 ? innings—the payoff of a simplified approach and mechanical changes that the Dodgers worked with him to implement after acquiring him.

?

The payoff continued on Monday night, as he was utterly dominant. While Greinke slogged through five-plus frames, Darvish whizzed through his. He needed just 30 pitches to get through three innings, including a seven-pitch third that give his opposite number, who grounded out in that stretch, almost no time to sit down. Until Descalso homered in the fifth, the Diamondbacks’ only baserunner came via a first-inning bunt single by Marte, and none of the 18 hitters he faced got to a three-ball count.

After a 20-pitch fifth, by far his most laborious inning of the night, Darvish’s pitch count was at 68 when Roberts let him bat with one out and a man on third in the top of the sixth, but after nearly hitting Walker once (a review confirmed the call that it was a foul ball), he did hit him on the very next pitch, which produced a scary moment. Between the two delays, Roberts must have decided that he’d gotten enough from his 31-year-old righty and turned things over to the bullpen.

In all, Darvish struck out seven and generated 15 swings and misses. Via Brooks Baseball, he threw six different types of pitches, but just one curve and one changeup. He dialed his four-seam fastball as high as 97.8 mph, averaging 95.2 and generating 11 strikes from among the 14 he threw, three of them swings and misses. He was also was tremendously efficient with his slider (27 pitches, 21 strikes, five swings and misses), and his cutter (21 pitches, 15 strikes, four swings and misses); the latter was a pitch the Dodgers encouraged him to emphasize.

After Darvish exited, Robert used Tony Cingrani (two outs), Brandon Morrow (four outs), Kenta Maeda and Jansen (three outs apiece) to finish off the Diamondbacks, and for the first time in the series, the Dodgers’ bullpen didn’t allow a run. Peralta’s one-out ninth-inning single off Jansen was the only baserunner they allowed while striking out four. Fittingly, Jansen struck out Paul Goldschmidt, the Dodgers’ top nemesis, on a 95 mph cutter outside to end the game and the series.

For the series, the Dodgers bullpen allowed four runs (three earned) in 11 ? innings, with a 10/1 strikeout-to-walk ratio.

Grinding Greinke

After a rough first season in Arizona in 2016, Greinke ranked among the NL’s top half-dozen hurlers in several key categories including ERA (3.20, sixth) and WAR (6.0, fourth), but he couldn’t get out of the fourth inning in the NL Wild Card Game. Even after four days of rest following his 58-pitch outing, the 33-year-old righty was anything but sharp in Game 3, though he did his best to keep the Diamondbacks in the game.

The trouble began when Taylor smoked that leadoff double into the leftfield corner on Greinke’s sixth pitch. Corey Seager followed with a seven pitch walk, and then Taylor advanced on via Justin Turner’s short fly ball and Bellinger’s grounder to first, with Paul Goldschmidt expecting to throw home but misstepping and missing first base on his first attempt. Greinke needed 29 pitches to complete the first inning thanks to a 10-pitch plate appearance by Yasiel Puig.

The 33-year-old righty burned another 25 pitches in the second inning, thanks in part to an eight-pitch walk by Chase Utley and a pesky six-pitch at-bat by Darvish, who struck out. Greinke loaded the bases in the third via a pair of walks and a Turner single. But despite walking five hitters and needing 88 pitches to get through the first four innings, he kept the score at 1-0.

Just when he put together his most impressive sequence of the night, getting Seager on a first-pitch flyball and Turner on a four-pitch strikeout to start the fifth, Greinke fell behind Bellinger 3-0, and then KABOOM.

After the Descalso homer cut the score to 2-1, Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo was ready to pinch-hit for his ace in the fifth, but Bellinger’s play on Mathis left the pitcher in the leadoff position to start the sixth. On Greinke’s second pitch of the sixth, he served up an 89 mph fastball that Barnes lined 398 feet to leftfield, restoring their two-run lead.

That ended Greinke’s night at 104 pitches, of which just five were swings and misses. While the Arizona bullpen turned in four scoreless innings, 2 ? by setup man Archie Bradley, the damage had been done. Poor Fernando Rodney, the Diamondbacks closer, not only never got to fire a single arrow, he never even got to pitch in the series.

<p>Back in early February, Baseball Prospectus&#39; PECOTA projection system pegged the Dodgers to win an MLB-high 98 games thanks to their combination of star power and depth, but almost nobody predicted the stellar contributions from either Bellinger or Taylor, whose opportunities were created by injuries to Logan Forsythe, Joc Pederson and Adrian Gonzalez. Taylor, acquired from the Mariners in June 2016 for former first-round pick Zach Lee, hit just .234/.289/.309 in 120 career games from 2014–16, and began the year in Triple A. When Logan Forsythe broke his toe in mid-April, the 27-year-old carved himself a spot in the lineup at second base, shifted to centerfield when Pederson went down with a concussion, filled in at shortstop when Corey Seager had elbow issues, and kept giving manager Dave Roberts a reason to keep writing his name in the lineup by hitting .288/.354/.496 with 21 homers, 17 steals and a 120 OPS+. His 4.8 WAR ranked third among Dodgers position players behind only Justin Turner and Seager.</p><p>Bellinger, the 22-year-old son of the former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, ranked number 7 on <em>Baseball America</em>&#39;s Top 100 Prospects list this spring. After spending most of 2016 in Double A, he appeared ticketed for Triple A with perhaps a late-season callup, but in the wake of injuries to Andre Ethier and Andrew Toles in April, the kid (then still 21) was called up to play leftfield. He debuted on April 25, homered twice in his fifth game, twice again in his 10th game, and just kept bopping to the point that he earned a place in the Home Run Derby and set an NL record with 39 dingers while batting .267/.352/.581 for a 142 OPS+. </p>
Los Angeles Dodgers: Cody Bellinger, Chris Taylor

Back in early February, Baseball Prospectus' PECOTA projection system pegged the Dodgers to win an MLB-high 98 games thanks to their combination of star power and depth, but almost nobody predicted the stellar contributions from either Bellinger or Taylor, whose opportunities were created by injuries to Logan Forsythe, Joc Pederson and Adrian Gonzalez. Taylor, acquired from the Mariners in June 2016 for former first-round pick Zach Lee, hit just .234/.289/.309 in 120 career games from 2014–16, and began the year in Triple A. When Logan Forsythe broke his toe in mid-April, the 27-year-old carved himself a spot in the lineup at second base, shifted to centerfield when Pederson went down with a concussion, filled in at shortstop when Corey Seager had elbow issues, and kept giving manager Dave Roberts a reason to keep writing his name in the lineup by hitting .288/.354/.496 with 21 homers, 17 steals and a 120 OPS+. His 4.8 WAR ranked third among Dodgers position players behind only Justin Turner and Seager.

Bellinger, the 22-year-old son of the former Yankees utilityman Clay Bellinger, ranked number 7 on Baseball America's Top 100 Prospects list this spring. After spending most of 2016 in Double A, he appeared ticketed for Triple A with perhaps a late-season callup, but in the wake of injuries to Andre Ethier and Andrew Toles in April, the kid (then still 21) was called up to play leftfield. He debuted on April 25, homered twice in his fifth game, twice again in his 10th game, and just kept bopping to the point that he earned a place in the Home Run Derby and set an NL record with 39 dingers while batting .267/.352/.581 for a 142 OPS+.

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