Atlético de Madrid vs. Celtic

Cnn goles de Falcao y Diego, los colchoneros abrieron ganando la Europa League.

Brendan Rodgers says Celtic committed to Champions League plan of attack

Kingsley Coman, right, vies with Celtic’s Cristian Gamboa in their 3-0 Champions League defeat against Bayern Munich.

Brendan Rodgers says Celtic committed to Champions League plan of attack

Brendan Rodgers says Celtic committed to Champions League plan of attack

Bayern's Robert Lewandowski reacts during a Group B Champions League soccer match between Bayern Munich and Celtic F.C. at the Allianz Arena in Munich, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

100 Spiele: Robben-Meilenstein in Königsklasse

Gegen Celtic Glasgow bestritt Arjen Robben sein 100. Spiel in der europäischen Königsklasse. Die größten Erfolge feierte er dabei mit dem deutschen Rekordmeister FC Bayern München.

Champions League: Unter Heynckes blüht Müller bei den Bayern auf

MUNICH, GERMANY - OCTOBER 18: Thomas Mueller of FC Bayern Muenchen runs with the ball during the UEFA Champions League group B match between Bayern Muenchen and Celtic FC at Allianz Arena on October 18, 2017 in Munich, Germany. (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images)

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017 (AFP Photo/Christof STACHE)

Bayern Munich's head coach Jupp Heynckes reacts during the Champions League group B match against Celtic Glasgow October 18, 2017

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during the Scottish Cup Semi-Final match between Celtic and Rangers at Hampden Park on April 23, 2017 in Glasgow, Scotland.

The Pep Effect: Guardiola's Dynamic Manchester City Worth Every Pound Spent

There was a joke about Pep Guardiola doing the rounds in the summer. It involves him going to see Manchester City’s owners in Abu Dhabi and setting out a glorious vision of football–attacking, free-spirited, breath-taking football–that would win every tournament going and have the world purring in admiration.

“What do you need to achieve this?” asks Sheikh Mansour.

“Not much,” says Guardiola. “Just the best two players in the world in every position.”

The amount Manchester City spent in the summer will always be there and will always be used as a means of denigrating Guardiola’s achievement at the club. It’s as though he, preaching such a pure stylistic doctrine and having benefited from a remarkable generation coming through La Masia when he was at Barcelona, is somehow expected to achieve success not merely with beautiful football but without spending any money. His must be an artisanal genius–which is all a little silly.

There are reasons for significant concern about the current distribution of revenue in modern football, the rampant neoliberalism that has left huge numbers of European leagues dominated by one or two clubs, but the fact is that the best teams spend money and nobody competes for long at the top without it.

Former Man City midfielder and mass spewer of opinions Joey Barton commented after City’s 7-2 win over Stoke City on Saturday that Guardiola wouldn’t be doing that if he were in charge of Burnley. Obviously, this is true, but so what? Lewis Hamilton wouldn’t be leading the Formula One championship if he were driving a Nissan Micra. Perhaps with a little more equality sport–life, even–would be better, but it’s ludicrous to think Guardiola should handicap himself until the system is improved.

And playing within that system, City’s football is remarkable. This is what was hoped for when Guardiola first joined the club. City's pace and movement are mesmerizing. The club's tally of 29 goals is more than any side has managed in its first eight games in the top flight since Everton in 1894-95, and it hasn’t been because of a simple fixture list. City's run to open the season has included a 1-0 win at the champion, Chelsea; a 5-0 win over Liverpool, which admittedly had Sadio Mane sent off in the first half; and a 6-0 win at Watford, which sits fourth in the current table.

Amid the excitement, though, there should be two caveats. The first is what happened last season, when City began the season with 10 straight wins, six of them in the Premier League that yielded 18 goals. Back then it, too, seemed unstoppable, only to lose its way after a 3-3 draw at Celtic in the Champions League. When Tottenham then beat City 2-0 in the league, it became clear that if an opponent pressed, it was vulnerable. Perhaps this City has a similar flaw. It looks like a much slicker, more coherent side, but there have been defensive concerns, most notably early on against Liverpool (although City ended up winning by a lopsided margin), in conceding two to Stoke on Saturday and then against Napoli on Tuesday when, having gone 2-0 up, City wobbled badly in the second half.

The other warning comes from 123 years ago. The Everton that scored 30 goals in its first eight games of the season didn’t win the league, overhauled by perhaps the greatest of all Sunderland sides. It’s hard to see an equivalent in the Premier League at the moment, although Manchester United remains unbeaten and just two points back. The two Manchester derbies could end up being vital.

Yet City’s form is already beginning to have an impact on the rest of the league. United on Saturday went to Anfield as it had last season–it defended deep, let Liverpool have the ball and came away with a 0-0 draw. Last season it was hailed as a good result, as United recovered after away defeats to Watford and Feyenoord against a Liverpool side that had won its previous five games.

This season, there were doubts. It wasn’t just that United has been playing well and Liverpool poorly and that, with momentum behind them, a more aggressive approach might have been expected from Liverpool. It was the thought that if City is playing this well, the title is likely to be won with well over 90 points, and that means every point lost is vital. To draw at Anfield isn’t problematic; what is is that Mourinho essentially played for one point from the start. The contrast with how City attacked and overwhelmed Chelsea was clear and, from United’s point of view, troubling.

With Kevin De Bruyne in the form of his life, the two fullbacks both playing superbly (even if one of them is a converted midfielder in Fabian Delph), Gabriel Jesus giving repeated masterclasses in mobile modern center-forward play, Ederson a huge upgrade on Claudio Bravo in goal and John Stones distributing with great confidence, this is attacking football the like of which the Premier League has never previously experienced.

It cost money, but there are plenty of other costly sides in the world and none of them are playing with anything like the verve of City at the moment.

The Pep Effect: Guardiola's Dynamic Manchester City Worth Every Pound Spent

There was a joke about Pep Guardiola doing the rounds in the summer. It involves him going to see Manchester City’s owners in Abu Dhabi and setting out a glorious vision of football–attacking, free-spirited, breath-taking football–that would win every tournament going and have the world purring in admiration.

“What do you need to achieve this?” asks Sheikh Mansour.

“Not much,” says Guardiola. “Just the best two players in the world in every position.”

The amount Manchester City spent in the summer will always be there and will always be used as a means of denigrating Guardiola’s achievement at the club. It’s as though he, preaching such a pure stylistic doctrine and having benefited from a remarkable generation coming through La Masia when he was at Barcelona, is somehow expected to achieve success not merely with beautiful football but without spending any money. His must be an artisanal genius–which is all a little silly.

There are reasons for significant concern about the current distribution of revenue in modern football, the rampant neoliberalism that has left huge numbers of European leagues dominated by one or two clubs, but the fact is that the best teams spend money and nobody competes for long at the top without it.

Former Man City midfielder and mass spewer of opinions Joey Barton commented after City’s 7-2 win over Stoke City on Saturday that Guardiola wouldn’t be doing that if he were in charge of Burnley. Obviously, this is true, but so what? Lewis Hamilton wouldn’t be leading the Formula One championship if he were driving a Nissan Micra. Perhaps with a little more equality sport–life, even–would be better, but it’s ludicrous to think Guardiola should handicap himself until the system is improved.

And playing within that system, City’s football is remarkable. This is what was hoped for when Guardiola first joined the club. City's pace and movement are mesmerizing. The club's tally of 29 goals is more than any side has managed in its first eight games in the top flight since Everton in 1894-95, and it hasn’t been because of a simple fixture list. City's run to open the season has included a 1-0 win at the champion, Chelsea; a 5-0 win over Liverpool, which admittedly had Sadio Mane sent off in the first half; and a 6-0 win at Watford, which sits fourth in the current table.

Amid the excitement, though, there should be two caveats. The first is what happened last season, when City began the season with 10 straight wins, six of them in the Premier League that yielded 18 goals. Back then it, too, seemed unstoppable, only to lose its way after a 3-3 draw at Celtic in the Champions League. When Tottenham then beat City 2-0 in the league, it became clear that if an opponent pressed, it was vulnerable. Perhaps this City has a similar flaw. It looks like a much slicker, more coherent side, but there have been defensive concerns, most notably early on against Liverpool (although City ended up winning by a lopsided margin), in conceding two to Stoke on Saturday and then against Napoli on Tuesday when, having gone 2-0 up, City wobbled badly in the second half.

The other warning comes from 123 years ago. The Everton that scored 30 goals in its first eight games of the season didn’t win the league, overhauled by perhaps the greatest of all Sunderland sides. It’s hard to see an equivalent in the Premier League at the moment, although Manchester United remains unbeaten and just two points back. The two Manchester derbies could end up being vital.

Yet City’s form is already beginning to have an impact on the rest of the league. United on Saturday went to Anfield as it had last season–it defended deep, let Liverpool have the ball and came away with a 0-0 draw. Last season it was hailed as a good result, as United recovered after away defeats to Watford and Feyenoord against a Liverpool side that had won its previous five games.

This season, there were doubts. It wasn’t just that United has been playing well and Liverpool poorly and that, with momentum behind them, a more aggressive approach might have been expected from Liverpool. It was the thought that if City is playing this well, the title is likely to be won with well over 90 points, and that means every point lost is vital. To draw at Anfield isn’t problematic; what is is that Mourinho essentially played for one point from the start. The contrast with how City attacked and overwhelmed Chelsea was clear and, from United’s point of view, troubling.

With Kevin De Bruyne in the form of his life, the two fullbacks both playing superbly (even if one of them is a converted midfielder in Fabian Delph), Gabriel Jesus giving repeated masterclasses in mobile modern center-forward play, Ederson a huge upgrade on Claudio Bravo in goal and John Stones distributing with great confidence, this is attacking football the like of which the Premier League has never previously experienced.

It cost money, but there are plenty of other costly sides in the world and none of them are playing with anything like the verve of City at the moment.

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Bayern Monaco vs Celtic - Champions League 2017 2018

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

In other circumstances, it would be no revelation if Celtic exhibited the symptoms of shell shock as a consequence of their European expeditions. In the space of 15 months they have endured defeat by the most minuscule opponents they have faced at this level – Lincoln Red Imps – along with their worst European loss, a 7-0 drubbing by Barcelona in the Nou Camp, and their heaviest home reverse, a 5-0 beating by Paris St-Germain. Their latest pounding was administered by Bayern Munich in the Allianz Arena on Wednesday, when the 3-0 score belied a contest that easily could have finished with the Bundesliga side ahead by double that margin. Brendan Rodgers and his players, however, are able to sustain such wounds without the legacy of disfiguring scar tissue because of their bipolar existence. If they prevail against Hibernian in the Betfred Scottish League Cup semi-final at Hampden Park on Saturday, the Hoops will record their 60th successive unbeaten domestic fixture, a sequence that has included half-a-dozen wins over Rangers, including two 5-1 drubbings, the second of which set a record for a Celtic victory at Ibrox. The accumulation of home comforts includes the three Scottish honours but, despite total command of their native domain, Celtic are cast in the role of impoverished neighbours compared to Champions League powers such as Paris St-Germain and Bayern Munich. It is not impossible for them to get beyond the group stage, as Gordon Strachan and Neil Lennon proved during their time in charge in the east end of Glasgow, but the chances of a repeat grow slimmer with every transfer deal priced in hundreds of millions of euros amongst the bloated ‘big five’ nations. Celtic suffered a beating in Bavaria Credit: REUTERS So it was that, while their heroes were chasing shadows against Bayern, the Celtic support kept up a constant stream of choruses in their lofty perch at the Allianz Arena. They were celebrating the simple fact of being present, events on the field notwithstanding. Rodgers, meanwhile, has a refrain of his own, to the effect that his squad are in a constant process of development. The evidence in his favour is that, after the competitive hiatus under his predecessor, Ronny Deila, the Northern Irishman has twice successfully steered his men through half-a-dozen hazardous qualifiers and, thanks to a merited 3-0 victory over Anderlecht in Brussels, Celtic are favourites to secure third spot in Group B and a place in the Europa League, where the demands are likely to be more congenial. It was this context which allowed Rodgers to be bullish in the aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat, despite the decision not to alter his favoured 4-2-3-1 formation, even when it meant a match-up with a Bayern side who were better equipped in every position – and who had been incited to demonstrate the mismatch by Jupp Heyncke’s return for a third spell in charge. The concession of three cheap goals and the narrow avoidance of greater damage prompted charges of naivety or presumption directed towards Rodgers but his retort was that his defenders were below par and that, if defeat was always the probable outcome, he would rather supervise an expansive game than a protective huddle. Bendan Rodgers watches his team take a beating Credit: REUTERS “I’d rather lose playing how we want to play and how we want to work, as opposed to sit in and defending for 90 minutes and still lose if that’s the case,” he said. Of course, the proposition can be advanced that if Celtic had concentrated on closing available space in their own half, thus narrowing the percentages in Bayern’s favour, they would have created the circumstances which can produce menacing counterattacks. Rodgers bridled somewhat when it was suggested that he could have been more pragmatic. “There was nothing about being pragmatic for the goals we conceded. We didn’t defend our box well enough from crosses coming in – we can do better with those,” he said. Celtic’s destiny in the group is unlikely to be affected by Bayern’s Halloween visit to Glasgow, but they will be expected to make a better fist of it on their own turf. Asked if he believed that he and his team-mates had the capacity to hurt Heynckes’s players at home, goalkeeper Craig Gordon said: “We are going to try but it is a big task. “They have got some world-class players and they will be looking to go quite far into this competition and try to win it. It was always going to be difficult. There are better teams than us who will be beaten 3-0 in Munich.” That may be true, but another drubbing at home, such as was inflicted by PSG, would be markedly less palatable. Pragmatism is not usually romantic but, against manifestly superior opponents, it need not be shorn of virtue.

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

Brendan Rodgers: 'I'd rather lose playing the Celtic way than sit and defend for 90 minutes and still lose'

How to Watch Bayern Munich vs. Celtic: Watch Online, Live Stream, TV

Bayern Munich hosts Celtic on Wednesday at the Allianz Arena in a Champions League contest.

The matchup is pivotal to the earlygoing in Group B, with the two teams tied at three points each and trailing leader PSG after two matches. Three points would mean a direct leg up toward qualification, and Bayern should be favorites at home and with more talent on the field.

Find out how to watch the match below.

How to watch

When: 2:45 p.m. ET, Wednesday, Oct. 18

TV: Fox Soccer Plus

Live Stream: Watch online with fuboTV. Sign up for a free trial here.

Why This Ex-Celtic Believes Gordon Hayward Could Return This Season

Remember how we told you not to get your hopes up about Gordon Hayward playing this season? Well, maybe don’t... Read More »

Nach Pleite in München: Celtic-Keeper Craig Gordon mit Ansage an FC Bayern

Mit 0:3 mussten sich die Schotten in München deutlich geschlagen geben. Glaubt man Celtic-Keeper Craig Gordon, wird sich das im Rückspiel ändern.

Champions League: Celtic-Keeper Craig Gordon mit Ansage an FC Bayern

Unter Neu-Trainer Jupp Heynckes findet der FC Bayern offenbar zurück zu alter Stärke. Das musste auch der FC Celtic am Mittwochabend erfahren. Mit 0:3 wurde der schottische Meister in München abgefertigt. Craig Gordon , Keeper bei den Glasgowern, hofft derweil, dass das zweite Aufeinandertreffen mit dem deutschen Rekordchampion in eine andere Richtung geht.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.

Salihamidzic: "Es läuft in richtige Richtung"

Nach dem 5:0 über den SC Freiburg, gewinnt der FC Bayern München mit 3:0 gegen Celtic Glasgow. FCB-Sportdirektor Hasan Salihamidzic lobt das Team und Trainer Jupp Heynckes.