Alemania x Brasil

Los dos gigantes mundiales se ven las caras en Stuttgart.

Nick Kyrgios won his way through to the semi-finals at Queen’s on Friday after edging two tie-breaks in a service stalemate against defending champion Feliciano Lopez. Lopez, 36, was successful with 90 per cent of his first serves but to no avail. The Australian produced aces on 50 per cent of his service wins, a total of 32, for the second match in a row at the tournament. Both sets were defined by dominant serving, with the receiver getting little of a look in. Kyrgios became mildly frustrated in the second set by the incessant strong serves coming his way, not even pretending to try on a couple of points. When the rallies did come, Lopez was cool at the net, moving better than an opponent who is 13 years his junior. But neither could capitalise on the handful of break points they were afforded and both sets were pushed to tie-breaks, where Kyrgios stepped his game up in, fittingly taking match point on a 136mph ace. Kyrgios said afterwards that he hardly practises his service. “I will never go out on the practice court and hit serves just for the sake of hitting serves,” he said. “I didn’t expect to serve the way I did but I just found my rhythm early again in this match. But I felt like I had to. He served way better than he did in Stuttgart when I played him last week.” Novak Djokovic is also through to the Queen's semis Credit: Getty Images Kyrgios sat out the clay season to rest his elbow and hip, which have troubled him over the past year, and said he felt in shape for Wimbledon. “I definitely feel like my preparation for Wimbledon maybe hasn’t been this good before,” he said. “I have never won a round [at Queen’s]. I have always gone into Wimbledon maybe a little bit underdone match-wise. I have played a lot of matches, which is maybe something that can help me.” Kyrgios now faces top seed Marin Cilic, who beat Sam Querrey in straight sets, in Saturday’s semi-final. Novak Djokovic also progressed after coming from a break down in the first set to beat Adrian Mannarino 7-5, 6-1. He will play the Frenchman Jeremy Chardy in the other semi.
Nick Kyrgios edges past Feliciano Lopez to reach Queen's semi-finals
Nick Kyrgios won his way through to the semi-finals at Queen’s on Friday after edging two tie-breaks in a service stalemate against defending champion Feliciano Lopez. Lopez, 36, was successful with 90 per cent of his first serves but to no avail. The Australian produced aces on 50 per cent of his service wins, a total of 32, for the second match in a row at the tournament. Both sets were defined by dominant serving, with the receiver getting little of a look in. Kyrgios became mildly frustrated in the second set by the incessant strong serves coming his way, not even pretending to try on a couple of points. When the rallies did come, Lopez was cool at the net, moving better than an opponent who is 13 years his junior. But neither could capitalise on the handful of break points they were afforded and both sets were pushed to tie-breaks, where Kyrgios stepped his game up in, fittingly taking match point on a 136mph ace. Kyrgios said afterwards that he hardly practises his service. “I will never go out on the practice court and hit serves just for the sake of hitting serves,” he said. “I didn’t expect to serve the way I did but I just found my rhythm early again in this match. But I felt like I had to. He served way better than he did in Stuttgart when I played him last week.” Novak Djokovic is also through to the Queen's semis Credit: Getty Images Kyrgios sat out the clay season to rest his elbow and hip, which have troubled him over the past year, and said he felt in shape for Wimbledon. “I definitely feel like my preparation for Wimbledon maybe hasn’t been this good before,” he said. “I have never won a round [at Queen’s]. I have always gone into Wimbledon maybe a little bit underdone match-wise. I have played a lot of matches, which is maybe something that can help me.” Kyrgios now faces top seed Marin Cilic, who beat Sam Querrey in straight sets, in Saturday’s semi-final. Novak Djokovic also progressed after coming from a break down in the first set to beat Adrian Mannarino 7-5, 6-1. He will play the Frenchman Jeremy Chardy in the other semi.
Nick Kyrgios won his way through to the semi-finals at Queen’s on Friday after edging two tie-breaks in a service stalemate against defending champion Feliciano Lopez. Lopez, 36, was successful with 90 per cent of his first serves but to no avail. The Australian produced aces on 50 per cent of his service wins, a total of 32, for the second match in a row at the tournament. Both sets were defined by dominant serving, with the receiver getting little of a look in. Kyrgios became mildly frustrated in the second set by the incessant strong serves coming his way, not even pretending to try on a couple of points. When the rallies did come, Lopez was cool at the net, moving better than an opponent who is 13 years his junior. But neither could capitalise on the handful of break points they were afforded and both sets were pushed to tie-breaks, where Kyrgios stepped his game up in, fittingly taking match point on a 136mph ace. Kyrgios said afterwards that he hardly practises his service. “I will never go out on the practice court and hit serves just for the sake of hitting serves,” he said. “I didn’t expect to serve the way I did but I just found my rhythm early again in this match. But I felt like I had to. He served way better than he did in Stuttgart when I played him last week.” Novak Djokovic is also through to the Queen's semis Credit: Getty Images Kyrgios sat out the clay season to rest his elbow and hip, which have troubled him over the past year, and said he felt in shape for Wimbledon. “I definitely feel like my preparation for Wimbledon maybe hasn’t been this good before,” he said. “I have never won a round [at Queen’s]. I have always gone into Wimbledon maybe a little bit underdone match-wise. I have played a lot of matches, which is maybe something that can help me.” Kyrgios now faces top seed Marin Cilic, who beat Sam Querrey in straight sets, in Saturday’s semi-final. Novak Djokovic also progressed after coming from a break down in the first set to beat Adrian Mannarino 7-5, 6-1. He will play the Frenchman Jeremy Chardy in the other semi.
Nick Kyrgios edges past Feliciano Lopez to reach Queen's semi-finals
Nick Kyrgios won his way through to the semi-finals at Queen’s on Friday after edging two tie-breaks in a service stalemate against defending champion Feliciano Lopez. Lopez, 36, was successful with 90 per cent of his first serves but to no avail. The Australian produced aces on 50 per cent of his service wins, a total of 32, for the second match in a row at the tournament. Both sets were defined by dominant serving, with the receiver getting little of a look in. Kyrgios became mildly frustrated in the second set by the incessant strong serves coming his way, not even pretending to try on a couple of points. When the rallies did come, Lopez was cool at the net, moving better than an opponent who is 13 years his junior. But neither could capitalise on the handful of break points they were afforded and both sets were pushed to tie-breaks, where Kyrgios stepped his game up in, fittingly taking match point on a 136mph ace. Kyrgios said afterwards that he hardly practises his service. “I will never go out on the practice court and hit serves just for the sake of hitting serves,” he said. “I didn’t expect to serve the way I did but I just found my rhythm early again in this match. But I felt like I had to. He served way better than he did in Stuttgart when I played him last week.” Novak Djokovic is also through to the Queen's semis Credit: Getty Images Kyrgios sat out the clay season to rest his elbow and hip, which have troubled him over the past year, and said he felt in shape for Wimbledon. “I definitely feel like my preparation for Wimbledon maybe hasn’t been this good before,” he said. “I have never won a round [at Queen’s]. I have always gone into Wimbledon maybe a little bit underdone match-wise. I have played a lot of matches, which is maybe something that can help me.” Kyrgios now faces top seed Marin Cilic, who beat Sam Querrey in straight sets, in Saturday’s semi-final. Novak Djokovic also progressed after coming from a break down in the first set to beat Adrian Mannarino 7-5, 6-1. He will play the Frenchman Jeremy Chardy in the other semi.
Darf der Torjäger des VfB Stuttgart in Sotschi gegen Schweden ran? Womöglich lieferte der DFB am Freitag ein Indiz dafür.
WM 2018: Stürmt Mario Gomez für die DFB-Elf gegen Schweden oder war der Auftritt bei der PK "ein Bluff"?
Darf der Torjäger des VfB Stuttgart in Sotschi gegen Schweden ran? Womöglich lieferte der DFB am Freitag ein Indiz dafür.
Darf der Torjäger des VfB Stuttgart in Sotschi gegen Schweden ran? Womöglich lieferte der DFB am Freitag ein Indiz dafür.
WM 2018: Stürmt Mario Gomez für die DFB-Elf gegen Schweden oder war der Auftritt bei der PK "ein Bluff"?
Darf der Torjäger des VfB Stuttgart in Sotschi gegen Schweden ran? Womöglich lieferte der DFB am Freitag ein Indiz dafür.
FILE PHOTO - Tennis - ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open
FILE PHOTO - Tennis - ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
FILE PHOTO: Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open
FILE PHOTO: Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
FILE PHOTO: Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open
FILE PHOTO: Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany
The Mercedes-Benz logo is seen before the company's annual news conference in Stuttgart, Germany, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
File photo of Mercedes-Benz logo pictured before company's annual news conference in Stuttgart
The Mercedes-Benz logo is seen before the company's annual news conference in Stuttgart, Germany, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
The Mercedes-Benz logo is seen before the company's annual news conference in Stuttgart, Germany, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
File photo of Mercedes-Benz logo pictured before company's annual news conference in Stuttgart
The Mercedes-Benz logo is seen before the company's annual news conference in Stuttgart, Germany, February 4, 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
 <div> <p><strong>Am Montag, dem 18. Juni, wurde dem CIO des Landes Baden-Württemberg, Stefan Krebs, ein <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/baden-wuerttemberg-blockchain-made-in-germany/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Strategiepapier überreicht" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Strategiepapier überreicht</a>, das sein Bundesland fit für die Blockchain-Adaption machen soll. Unter den Initiatoren sind bekannte Namen wie IBM, Daimler, Börse Stuttgart oder Bosch zu finden – Unternehmen, die bereits erste Blockchain-Erfahrungen gesammelt haben. Das Ziel ist neben einer allgemeinen Verbesserung des Blockchain-Ökosystems in Wirtschaft und Verwaltung vor allem die Einbeziehung von kleinen und mittelständischen Unternehmen in die Krypto-Ökonomie – Blockchain als Teil der Industrie 4.0. </strong></p> <p>Zwar wird eine einzelne Landesinitiative nicht ausschlaggebend für die Frage sein, ob Deutschland den Anschluss an die Blockchain-Ökonomie behält, aber sie kann fraglos ein wichtiger Impuls unter vielen sein. Die letzten Monate haben gezeigt, dass Initiativen auf EU- oder Bundesebene oftmals nur sehr schleppend vorankommen. Impulse von den unteren Verwaltungsebenen, also von einzelnen Kommunen und Bundesländern, können dabei helfen, das Thema verstärkt in den Diskurs auf EU- und Bundesebene zu tragen. Je mehr Kommunen und Bundesländer Blockchain-Projekte forcieren, desto wahrscheinlicher wird es, dass auch der Bund bereit ist, eine krypto-freundliche Regulierung umzusetzen.</p> <h2><strong>Stuttgart, nicht Berlin</strong></h2> <p>Ein Wettbewerb auf Länderebene könnte so schneller zu kleinen Blockchain-Use-Cases und Sandboxes führen als dies auf Bundesebene der Fall ist. Gerade Baden-Württemberg kann hier als Bundesland eine Blockchain-Führungsrolle in Deutschland einnehmen. Zwar mögen langfristig große Wertschöpfungspotentiale in der Berliner Blockchain-Startup-Szene liegen, doch sind die Konzerne und die so genannten Hidden Champions eher in Baden-Württemberg zu finden. Hier kann die Blockchain-Technologie viel zeitnaher zu wirtschaftlichen Erfolgen führen, als dies in anderen Regionen Deutschlands der Fall ist.</p> <p>Die Maschinenbauer und Automobilzulieferer im Ländle brauchen eine sichere dezentrale Infrastruktur, um das Internet der Dinge im Rahmen von Industrie 4.0 erfolgreich umzusetzen. Wenn also eine Produktionsmaschine automatisiert neue Rohstoffe bestellt, gleichzeitig die Zahlung veranlasst und den anderen Maschinen mittels Machine-to-Machine-Kommunikation diese Information mitteilt, dann drängen sich hier einige Blockchain-Use-Cases auf. Insbesondere in der Logistik und im Supply Chain Management sind die kurzfristigen Wertschöpfungspotentiale größer als in den meisten anderen Branchen – Finanzen und Energie mit eingeschlossen. So effizient die meisten Unternehmen in Baden-Württemberg und in Deutschland auch arbeiten mögen, so existieren im Außenverhältnis mit externen Dienstleistern doch große Reibungsverluste und Ineffizienzen, die durch Blockchain-Lösungen wie sie etwa <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWnFei-ugT8" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:IBM vorstellt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">IBM vorstellt</a>, drastisch reduziert werden können.</p> <h2><strong>Blockchain-Föderalismus</strong></h2> <p>Wie hoch der effektive Nutzen von solchen Initiativen letztlich ist, lässt sich im Vorhinein nur schwer bemessen. Für nachhaltigen Erfolg müssen auf die markigen Ankündigungen auch Taten folgen. Damit dies gelingt, braucht es den Austausch zwischen Blockchain-Startups und Old Economy. Genau an dieser Stelle hapert es jedoch bislang: Die Mittelständler in Baden-Württemberg und die Startups in Berlin, Hamburg oder München finden noch nicht recht zusammen. So findet auf den unzähligen Meetups längst ein reger Austausch innerhalb der Blockchain-Szene statt, doch Industrievertreter lassen sich hier bislang nur selten blicken. Schade!</p> <p>Hoffentlich steckt die Initiative auch die restlichen 15 Bundesländer an, sodass in Zukunft jedes Bundesland sein eigenes Krypto-Valley besitzt, das mit den anderen in regem Austausch steht – dezentral, wie es der Föderalismus vorsieht.</p> <p>BTC-ECHO</p> </div>  <div><em>Source: <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/blockchain-foederalismus-wenn-die-schwaben-an-berlin-vorbeiziehen/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:BTC-ECHO" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">BTC-ECHO</a></em></div> <p>Der Beitrag <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/blockchain-foederalismus-wenn-die-schwaben-an-berlin-vorbeiziehen/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen</a> erschien zuerst auf <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:BTC-ECHO" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">BTC-ECHO</a>.</p>
Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen

Am Montag, dem 18. Juni, wurde dem CIO des Landes Baden-Württemberg, Stefan Krebs, ein Strategiepapier überreicht, das sein Bundesland fit für die Blockchain-Adaption machen soll. Unter den Initiatoren sind bekannte Namen wie IBM, Daimler, Börse Stuttgart oder Bosch zu finden – Unternehmen, die bereits erste Blockchain-Erfahrungen gesammelt haben. Das Ziel ist neben einer allgemeinen Verbesserung des Blockchain-Ökosystems in Wirtschaft und Verwaltung vor allem die Einbeziehung von kleinen und mittelständischen Unternehmen in die Krypto-Ökonomie – Blockchain als Teil der Industrie 4.0.

Zwar wird eine einzelne Landesinitiative nicht ausschlaggebend für die Frage sein, ob Deutschland den Anschluss an die Blockchain-Ökonomie behält, aber sie kann fraglos ein wichtiger Impuls unter vielen sein. Die letzten Monate haben gezeigt, dass Initiativen auf EU- oder Bundesebene oftmals nur sehr schleppend vorankommen. Impulse von den unteren Verwaltungsebenen, also von einzelnen Kommunen und Bundesländern, können dabei helfen, das Thema verstärkt in den Diskurs auf EU- und Bundesebene zu tragen. Je mehr Kommunen und Bundesländer Blockchain-Projekte forcieren, desto wahrscheinlicher wird es, dass auch der Bund bereit ist, eine krypto-freundliche Regulierung umzusetzen.

Stuttgart, nicht Berlin

Ein Wettbewerb auf Länderebene könnte so schneller zu kleinen Blockchain-Use-Cases und Sandboxes führen als dies auf Bundesebene der Fall ist. Gerade Baden-Württemberg kann hier als Bundesland eine Blockchain-Führungsrolle in Deutschland einnehmen. Zwar mögen langfristig große Wertschöpfungspotentiale in der Berliner Blockchain-Startup-Szene liegen, doch sind die Konzerne und die so genannten Hidden Champions eher in Baden-Württemberg zu finden. Hier kann die Blockchain-Technologie viel zeitnaher zu wirtschaftlichen Erfolgen führen, als dies in anderen Regionen Deutschlands der Fall ist.

Die Maschinenbauer und Automobilzulieferer im Ländle brauchen eine sichere dezentrale Infrastruktur, um das Internet der Dinge im Rahmen von Industrie 4.0 erfolgreich umzusetzen. Wenn also eine Produktionsmaschine automatisiert neue Rohstoffe bestellt, gleichzeitig die Zahlung veranlasst und den anderen Maschinen mittels Machine-to-Machine-Kommunikation diese Information mitteilt, dann drängen sich hier einige Blockchain-Use-Cases auf. Insbesondere in der Logistik und im Supply Chain Management sind die kurzfristigen Wertschöpfungspotentiale größer als in den meisten anderen Branchen – Finanzen und Energie mit eingeschlossen. So effizient die meisten Unternehmen in Baden-Württemberg und in Deutschland auch arbeiten mögen, so existieren im Außenverhältnis mit externen Dienstleistern doch große Reibungsverluste und Ineffizienzen, die durch Blockchain-Lösungen wie sie etwa IBM vorstellt, drastisch reduziert werden können.

Blockchain-Föderalismus

Wie hoch der effektive Nutzen von solchen Initiativen letztlich ist, lässt sich im Vorhinein nur schwer bemessen. Für nachhaltigen Erfolg müssen auf die markigen Ankündigungen auch Taten folgen. Damit dies gelingt, braucht es den Austausch zwischen Blockchain-Startups und Old Economy. Genau an dieser Stelle hapert es jedoch bislang: Die Mittelständler in Baden-Württemberg und die Startups in Berlin, Hamburg oder München finden noch nicht recht zusammen. So findet auf den unzähligen Meetups längst ein reger Austausch innerhalb der Blockchain-Szene statt, doch Industrievertreter lassen sich hier bislang nur selten blicken. Schade!

Hoffentlich steckt die Initiative auch die restlichen 15 Bundesländer an, sodass in Zukunft jedes Bundesland sein eigenes Krypto-Valley besitzt, das mit den anderen in regem Austausch steht – dezentral, wie es der Föderalismus vorsieht.

BTC-ECHO

Source: BTC-ECHO

Der Beitrag Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen erschien zuerst auf BTC-ECHO.

 <div> <p><strong>Am Montag, dem 18. Juni, wurde dem CIO des Landes Baden-Württemberg, Stefan Krebs, ein <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/baden-wuerttemberg-blockchain-made-in-germany/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Strategiepapier überreicht" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Strategiepapier überreicht</a>, das sein Bundesland fit für die Blockchain-Adaption machen soll. Unter den Initiatoren sind bekannte Namen wie IBM, Daimler, Börse Stuttgart oder Bosch zu finden – Unternehmen, die bereits erste Blockchain-Erfahrungen gesammelt haben. Das Ziel ist neben einer allgemeinen Verbesserung des Blockchain-Ökosystems in Wirtschaft und Verwaltung vor allem die Einbeziehung von kleinen und mittelständischen Unternehmen in die Krypto-Ökonomie – Blockchain als Teil der Industrie 4.0. </strong></p> <p>Zwar wird eine einzelne Landesinitiative nicht ausschlaggebend für die Frage sein, ob Deutschland den Anschluss an die Blockchain-Ökonomie behält, aber sie kann fraglos ein wichtiger Impuls unter vielen sein. Die letzten Monate haben gezeigt, dass Initiativen auf EU- oder Bundesebene oftmals nur sehr schleppend vorankommen. Impulse von den unteren Verwaltungsebenen, also von einzelnen Kommunen und Bundesländern, können dabei helfen, das Thema verstärkt in den Diskurs auf EU- und Bundesebene zu tragen. Je mehr Kommunen und Bundesländer Blockchain-Projekte forcieren, desto wahrscheinlicher wird es, dass auch der Bund bereit ist, eine krypto-freundliche Regulierung umzusetzen.</p> <h2><strong>Stuttgart, nicht Berlin</strong></h2> <p>Ein Wettbewerb auf Länderebene könnte so schneller zu kleinen Blockchain-Use-Cases und Sandboxes führen als dies auf Bundesebene der Fall ist. Gerade Baden-Württemberg kann hier als Bundesland eine Blockchain-Führungsrolle in Deutschland einnehmen. Zwar mögen langfristig große Wertschöpfungspotentiale in der Berliner Blockchain-Startup-Szene liegen, doch sind die Konzerne und die so genannten Hidden Champions eher in Baden-Württemberg zu finden. Hier kann die Blockchain-Technologie viel zeitnaher zu wirtschaftlichen Erfolgen führen, als dies in anderen Regionen Deutschlands der Fall ist.</p> <p>Die Maschinenbauer und Automobilzulieferer im Ländle brauchen eine sichere dezentrale Infrastruktur, um das Internet der Dinge im Rahmen von Industrie 4.0 erfolgreich umzusetzen. Wenn also eine Produktionsmaschine automatisiert neue Rohstoffe bestellt, gleichzeitig die Zahlung veranlasst und den anderen Maschinen mittels Machine-to-Machine-Kommunikation diese Information mitteilt, dann drängen sich hier einige Blockchain-Use-Cases auf. Insbesondere in der Logistik und im Supply Chain Management sind die kurzfristigen Wertschöpfungspotentiale größer als in den meisten anderen Branchen – Finanzen und Energie mit eingeschlossen. So effizient die meisten Unternehmen in Baden-Württemberg und in Deutschland auch arbeiten mögen, so existieren im Außenverhältnis mit externen Dienstleistern doch große Reibungsverluste und Ineffizienzen, die durch Blockchain-Lösungen wie sie etwa <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWnFei-ugT8" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:IBM vorstellt" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">IBM vorstellt</a>, drastisch reduziert werden können.</p> <h2><strong>Blockchain-Föderalismus</strong></h2> <p>Wie hoch der effektive Nutzen von solchen Initiativen letztlich ist, lässt sich im Vorhinein nur schwer bemessen. Für nachhaltigen Erfolg müssen auf die markigen Ankündigungen auch Taten folgen. Damit dies gelingt, braucht es den Austausch zwischen Blockchain-Startups und Old Economy. Genau an dieser Stelle hapert es jedoch bislang: Die Mittelständler in Baden-Württemberg und die Startups in Berlin, Hamburg oder München finden noch nicht recht zusammen. So findet auf den unzähligen Meetups längst ein reger Austausch innerhalb der Blockchain-Szene statt, doch Industrievertreter lassen sich hier bislang nur selten blicken. Schade!</p> <p>Hoffentlich steckt die Initiative auch die restlichen 15 Bundesländer an, sodass in Zukunft jedes Bundesland sein eigenes Krypto-Valley besitzt, das mit den anderen in regem Austausch steht – dezentral, wie es der Föderalismus vorsieht.</p> <p>BTC-ECHO</p> </div>  <div><em>Source: <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/blockchain-foederalismus-wenn-die-schwaben-an-berlin-vorbeiziehen/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:BTC-ECHO" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">BTC-ECHO</a></em></div> <p>Der Beitrag <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de/blockchain-foederalismus-wenn-die-schwaben-an-berlin-vorbeiziehen/" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen</a> erschien zuerst auf <a href="https://www.btc-echo.de" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:BTC-ECHO" class="link rapid-noclick-resp">BTC-ECHO</a>.</p>
Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen

Am Montag, dem 18. Juni, wurde dem CIO des Landes Baden-Württemberg, Stefan Krebs, ein Strategiepapier überreicht, das sein Bundesland fit für die Blockchain-Adaption machen soll. Unter den Initiatoren sind bekannte Namen wie IBM, Daimler, Börse Stuttgart oder Bosch zu finden – Unternehmen, die bereits erste Blockchain-Erfahrungen gesammelt haben. Das Ziel ist neben einer allgemeinen Verbesserung des Blockchain-Ökosystems in Wirtschaft und Verwaltung vor allem die Einbeziehung von kleinen und mittelständischen Unternehmen in die Krypto-Ökonomie – Blockchain als Teil der Industrie 4.0.

Zwar wird eine einzelne Landesinitiative nicht ausschlaggebend für die Frage sein, ob Deutschland den Anschluss an die Blockchain-Ökonomie behält, aber sie kann fraglos ein wichtiger Impuls unter vielen sein. Die letzten Monate haben gezeigt, dass Initiativen auf EU- oder Bundesebene oftmals nur sehr schleppend vorankommen. Impulse von den unteren Verwaltungsebenen, also von einzelnen Kommunen und Bundesländern, können dabei helfen, das Thema verstärkt in den Diskurs auf EU- und Bundesebene zu tragen. Je mehr Kommunen und Bundesländer Blockchain-Projekte forcieren, desto wahrscheinlicher wird es, dass auch der Bund bereit ist, eine krypto-freundliche Regulierung umzusetzen.

Stuttgart, nicht Berlin

Ein Wettbewerb auf Länderebene könnte so schneller zu kleinen Blockchain-Use-Cases und Sandboxes führen als dies auf Bundesebene der Fall ist. Gerade Baden-Württemberg kann hier als Bundesland eine Blockchain-Führungsrolle in Deutschland einnehmen. Zwar mögen langfristig große Wertschöpfungspotentiale in der Berliner Blockchain-Startup-Szene liegen, doch sind die Konzerne und die so genannten Hidden Champions eher in Baden-Württemberg zu finden. Hier kann die Blockchain-Technologie viel zeitnaher zu wirtschaftlichen Erfolgen führen, als dies in anderen Regionen Deutschlands der Fall ist.

Die Maschinenbauer und Automobilzulieferer im Ländle brauchen eine sichere dezentrale Infrastruktur, um das Internet der Dinge im Rahmen von Industrie 4.0 erfolgreich umzusetzen. Wenn also eine Produktionsmaschine automatisiert neue Rohstoffe bestellt, gleichzeitig die Zahlung veranlasst und den anderen Maschinen mittels Machine-to-Machine-Kommunikation diese Information mitteilt, dann drängen sich hier einige Blockchain-Use-Cases auf. Insbesondere in der Logistik und im Supply Chain Management sind die kurzfristigen Wertschöpfungspotentiale größer als in den meisten anderen Branchen – Finanzen und Energie mit eingeschlossen. So effizient die meisten Unternehmen in Baden-Württemberg und in Deutschland auch arbeiten mögen, so existieren im Außenverhältnis mit externen Dienstleistern doch große Reibungsverluste und Ineffizienzen, die durch Blockchain-Lösungen wie sie etwa IBM vorstellt, drastisch reduziert werden können.

Blockchain-Föderalismus

Wie hoch der effektive Nutzen von solchen Initiativen letztlich ist, lässt sich im Vorhinein nur schwer bemessen. Für nachhaltigen Erfolg müssen auf die markigen Ankündigungen auch Taten folgen. Damit dies gelingt, braucht es den Austausch zwischen Blockchain-Startups und Old Economy. Genau an dieser Stelle hapert es jedoch bislang: Die Mittelständler in Baden-Württemberg und die Startups in Berlin, Hamburg oder München finden noch nicht recht zusammen. So findet auf den unzähligen Meetups längst ein reger Austausch innerhalb der Blockchain-Szene statt, doch Industrievertreter lassen sich hier bislang nur selten blicken. Schade!

Hoffentlich steckt die Initiative auch die restlichen 15 Bundesländer an, sodass in Zukunft jedes Bundesland sein eigenes Krypto-Valley besitzt, das mit den anderen in regem Austausch steht – dezentral, wie es der Föderalismus vorsieht.

BTC-ECHO

Source: BTC-ECHO

Der Beitrag Blockchain-Föderalismus – Wenn die Schwaben an Berlin vorbeiziehen erschien zuerst auf BTC-ECHO.

What is it? The second round of matches is underway as Germany take on Sweden in Group F. The much-fancied Germans were stunned in their opening game, going down 1-0 to Mexico, so a win against the Swedes is vital if they are to qualify from the group stages. Sweden got their campaign up and running with a 1-0 win over South Korea. And a win for Janne Andersson's side could see reigning world champions Germany exit the World Cup after the first round for the first time in 80 years. When is it? Saturday, June 23. What time is kick-off? 7pm UK time. What TV channel is it on? ITV 1. Alternatively, you can follow the match live with us on Telegraph Sport. Where is the game being played? Fisht Stadium, Sochi. World Cup 2018 stadium: Fisht Stadium What is the team news? There's been significant debate about the role of Marco Reus and whether he should be starting for Germany. Reus came on in the 60th minute against Mexico and Germany's attack was notably better once he got involved. But Reus has suffered significant injuries the past few seasons, none bigger than a knee injury that caused him to miss more than half of last season with Dortmund. "I really have no say in this. All I can do is make is as hard as possible for them to do without me," Reus said. "I try and give my all in training, offer myself and do hope of course I'll be picked in order to help Germany get out of the group." World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game The squads in full: Germany Goalkeepers: Manuel Neuer (Bayern Munich), Marc-Andre ter Stegen (Barcelona), Kevin Trapp (Paris St Germain). Defenders: Jerome Boateng (Bayern Munich), Matthias Ginter (Borussia Moenchengladbach), Jonas Hector (Cologne), Mats Hummels (Bayern Munich), Joshua Kimmich (Bayern Munich), Marvin Plattenhardt (Hertha Berlin), Antonio Ruediger (Chelsea), Niklas Suele (Bayern Munich). Midfielders: Julian Brandt (Bayer Leverkusen), Julian Draxler (Paris St Germain), Leon Goretzka (Schalke 04), Ilkay Gundogan (Manchester City), Sami Khedira (Juventus), Toni Kroos (Real Madrid), Marco Reus (Borussia Dortmund), Sebastian Rudy (Bayern Munich), Mesut Ozil (Arsenal). Forwards: Mario Gomez (VfB Stuttgart), Thomas Mueller (Bayern Munich), Timo Werner (RB Leipzig). ----- Sweden Robin Olsen, Karl-Johan Johnsson, Kristoffer Nordfeldt, Mikael Lustig, Victor Lindelof, Andreas Granqvist, Martin Olsson, Ludwig Augustinsson, Filip Helander, Emil Krafth, Pontus Jansson, Sebastian Larsson, Albin Ekdal, Emil Forsberg, Gustav Svensson, Oscar Hiljemark, Viktor Claesson, Marcus Rohden, Jimmy Durmaz, Marcus Berg, John Guidetti, Ola Toivonen, Isaac Kiese Thelin. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more What's the latest news? Sweden's World Cup clash with Germany in Sochi on Saturday will carry extra sporting spice for their defender Martin Olsson because his sister is married to top German basketball player Dirk Nowitzki. As soon as the draw was made the full-back's phone started buzzing with messages from his brother-in-law, who plays for the Dallas Mavericks in the NBA on the other side of the Atlantic. "He's a big football fan, so there's a lot of football talk in the family," Olsson said. "We have a family chat on WhatsApp so there's been a good bit of banter. He probably wants Germany to win but it hasn't got serious yet, before the game starts it probably will." Sweden outlasted Holland to advance in World Cup qualifying. When the Swedes got to the European play-off round and a chance to reach Russia, they methodically eliminated past champion Italy over two games. At this point, why not knock out another high-profile team - and the pre-tournament favourites at that? If that were to happen, it would be the second consecutive World Cup where the defending champion have been knocked out of contention before the knockout stage. test - do not delete "We need to dare to do even more," Sweden coach Janne Andersson said after beating South Korea 1-0 in its opener. Beating Germany would certainly throw even more chaos into an already unpredictable World Cup. Sweden will find a wounded Germany line-up trying to rebound from a 1-0 loss to Mexico in the opener where they were thoroughly outplayed. It was the first time since 1982 that a German team lost its opening match at the World Cup. And immediately questions followed about the state of the squad. What stood out in the loss to Mexico was Germany's susceptibility to the counter attack and the number of scoring opportunities allowed. "Against Sweden it will be a different set-up. Sweden has different strengths and weaknesses compared to Mexico," Thomas Mueller said. "I don't expect them to be as fantastically gifted when it comes to transitions as the Mexicans, but having said that they have some players that can hurt us on the offensive." test - do not delete What are the odds? Germany to win - 4/9 Draw - 7/2 Sweden to win - 8/1 What's our prediction? Germany and Sweden haven't met since qualifying for the 2014 World Cup when they were in the same group. The teams played out a 4-4 draw in Berlin, before Germany earned a 5-3 win in Sweden on Oct 15, 2013. Another goalfest would be just what this tournament needs. Prediction: Germany 3 Sweden 2 WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
World Cup 2018, Germany vs Sweden: What time is kick-off on Saturday, what TV channel is it on and what is our prediction?
What is it? The second round of matches is underway as Germany take on Sweden in Group F. The much-fancied Germans were stunned in their opening game, going down 1-0 to Mexico, so a win against the Swedes is vital if they are to qualify from the group stages. Sweden got their campaign up and running with a 1-0 win over South Korea. And a win for Janne Andersson's side could see reigning world champions Germany exit the World Cup after the first round for the first time in 80 years. When is it? Saturday, June 23. What time is kick-off? 7pm UK time. What TV channel is it on? ITV 1. Alternatively, you can follow the match live with us on Telegraph Sport. Where is the game being played? Fisht Stadium, Sochi. World Cup 2018 stadium: Fisht Stadium What is the team news? There's been significant debate about the role of Marco Reus and whether he should be starting for Germany. Reus came on in the 60th minute against Mexico and Germany's attack was notably better once he got involved. But Reus has suffered significant injuries the past few seasons, none bigger than a knee injury that caused him to miss more than half of last season with Dortmund. "I really have no say in this. All I can do is make is as hard as possible for them to do without me," Reus said. "I try and give my all in training, offer myself and do hope of course I'll be picked in order to help Germany get out of the group." World Cup 2018 Simulator Single Game The squads in full: Germany Goalkeepers: Manuel Neuer (Bayern Munich), Marc-Andre ter Stegen (Barcelona), Kevin Trapp (Paris St Germain). Defenders: Jerome Boateng (Bayern Munich), Matthias Ginter (Borussia Moenchengladbach), Jonas Hector (Cologne), Mats Hummels (Bayern Munich), Joshua Kimmich (Bayern Munich), Marvin Plattenhardt (Hertha Berlin), Antonio Ruediger (Chelsea), Niklas Suele (Bayern Munich). Midfielders: Julian Brandt (Bayer Leverkusen), Julian Draxler (Paris St Germain), Leon Goretzka (Schalke 04), Ilkay Gundogan (Manchester City), Sami Khedira (Juventus), Toni Kroos (Real Madrid), Marco Reus (Borussia Dortmund), Sebastian Rudy (Bayern Munich), Mesut Ozil (Arsenal). Forwards: Mario Gomez (VfB Stuttgart), Thomas Mueller (Bayern Munich), Timo Werner (RB Leipzig). ----- Sweden Robin Olsen, Karl-Johan Johnsson, Kristoffer Nordfeldt, Mikael Lustig, Victor Lindelof, Andreas Granqvist, Martin Olsson, Ludwig Augustinsson, Filip Helander, Emil Krafth, Pontus Jansson, Sebastian Larsson, Albin Ekdal, Emil Forsberg, Gustav Svensson, Oscar Hiljemark, Viktor Claesson, Marcus Rohden, Jimmy Durmaz, Marcus Berg, John Guidetti, Ola Toivonen, Isaac Kiese Thelin. World Cup 2018 | Fixtures, groups, squads and more What's the latest news? Sweden's World Cup clash with Germany in Sochi on Saturday will carry extra sporting spice for their defender Martin Olsson because his sister is married to top German basketball player Dirk Nowitzki. As soon as the draw was made the full-back's phone started buzzing with messages from his brother-in-law, who plays for the Dallas Mavericks in the NBA on the other side of the Atlantic. "He's a big football fan, so there's a lot of football talk in the family," Olsson said. "We have a family chat on WhatsApp so there's been a good bit of banter. He probably wants Germany to win but it hasn't got serious yet, before the game starts it probably will." Sweden outlasted Holland to advance in World Cup qualifying. When the Swedes got to the European play-off round and a chance to reach Russia, they methodically eliminated past champion Italy over two games. At this point, why not knock out another high-profile team - and the pre-tournament favourites at that? If that were to happen, it would be the second consecutive World Cup where the defending champion have been knocked out of contention before the knockout stage. test - do not delete "We need to dare to do even more," Sweden coach Janne Andersson said after beating South Korea 1-0 in its opener. Beating Germany would certainly throw even more chaos into an already unpredictable World Cup. Sweden will find a wounded Germany line-up trying to rebound from a 1-0 loss to Mexico in the opener where they were thoroughly outplayed. It was the first time since 1982 that a German team lost its opening match at the World Cup. And immediately questions followed about the state of the squad. What stood out in the loss to Mexico was Germany's susceptibility to the counter attack and the number of scoring opportunities allowed. "Against Sweden it will be a different set-up. Sweden has different strengths and weaknesses compared to Mexico," Thomas Mueller said. "I don't expect them to be as fantastically gifted when it comes to transitions as the Mexicans, but having said that they have some players that can hurt us on the offensive." test - do not delete What are the odds? Germany to win - 4/9 Draw - 7/2 Sweden to win - 8/1 What's our prediction? Germany and Sweden haven't met since qualifying for the 2014 World Cup when they were in the same group. The teams played out a 4-4 draw in Berlin, before Germany earned a 5-3 win in Sweden on Oct 15, 2013. Another goalfest would be just what this tournament needs. Prediction: Germany 3 Sweden 2 WorldCup - newsletter promo - end of article
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen
FILE PHOTO: Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche assemble sports cars at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski/File Photo
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen
Employees of German car manufacturer Porsche work on a Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at the Porsche factory in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen, Germany, January 26, 2018. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
FILE PHOTO: Tennis - ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open
FILE PHOTO: Tennis - ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
Imagen de archivo del logo de Mercedes-Benz, de Daimler, durante la junta anual de accionistas en Stuttgart, Alemania, 4 de febrero de 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
Imagen de archivo del logo de Mercedes-Benz, de Daimler, durante la junta anual de accionistas en Stuttgart, Alemania
Imagen de archivo del logo de Mercedes-Benz, de Daimler, durante la junta anual de accionistas en Stuttgart, Alemania, 4 de febrero de 2016. REUTERS/Michaela Rehle
A Mercedes-Benz CLS 350d automobile, manufactured by Daimler AG, sits in an underground parking lot during during an automated parking demonstration at the Mercedes-Benz TecDay event in Stuttgart, Germany, on Monday, May 28, 2018. Mercedes, the worlds best-selling luxury-car brand, last month posted its best quarterly sales ever, with deliveries of the GLC crossover increasing 33 percent and the revised flagship S-Class posting a 29 percent gain. Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg
Five Things You Need to Know to Start Your Day
A Mercedes-Benz CLS 350d automobile, manufactured by Daimler AG, sits in an underground parking lot during during an automated parking demonstration at the Mercedes-Benz TecDay event in Stuttgart, Germany, on Monday, May 28, 2018. Mercedes, the worlds best-selling luxury-car brand, last month posted its best quarterly sales ever, with deliveries of the GLC crossover increasing 33 percent and the revised flagship S-Class posting a 29 percent gain. Photographer: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
Nick Kyrgios at his brilliant best to see off Kyle Edmund at Queen's
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
Nick Kyrgios at his brilliant best to see off Kyle Edmund at Queen's
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
Nick Kyrgios at his brilliant best to see off Kyle Edmund at Queen's
Zap! Pow! Wallop! At his best, Nick Kyrgios plays tennis like he is wearing a superhero costume, and on Thursday the ball kept pinging off his racket as if powered by dynamite. This was unfortunate for Kyle Edmund, the last Briton standing at the Fever-Tree Championships, who saw no fewer than 32 aces fly past during Thursday’s 7-6, 6-7, 6-3 defeat. Having eliminated Andy Murray on Tuesday night, Kyrgios has almost single-handedly ended home hopes at the Queen’s Club – but tournament organisers won’t mind if he goes on to feature in Sunday’s final. Because, with the possible exception of the “Big Four”, Kyrgios is the most compelling character in modern tennis. At times, he doesn’t seem to care whether he wins or loses. At other times, he can be foul-mouthed and obnoxious (BBC commentator Andrew Cotter was forced to apologise for a late volley of obscenities on Thursday). But he is that rare thing: an athlete with enough charisma and talent to drag millennials away from their social-media feeds. For the future of tennis, it would be handy if he hung around. There was one problem with Thursday’s match: whole games rushed past without a single rally being played. In the second set, when Kyrgios’s serve was at its most venomous, Edmund was just about managing to scramble one serve back into play in each game. David de Gea himself wouldn’t have laid a glove on many of these balls. Kyrgios is the type of player you cannot take your eyes off Credit: reuters The match often resembled darts as much as tennis, with each player stepping up to the oche in turn. But on the odd occasions when a rally did break out, the quality of the strokeplay more than compensated for the longueurs in between. The hottest shot of a match that featured many contenders came when Kyrgios stepped forward to pick up an Edmund volley and produced a perfect lob winner… from between his own legs. Some might feel that such antics are disrespectful to the game, or to Kyrgios’s opponents. But they function as a sort of pressure valve, helping him to relax. When he is enjoying himself, he is more likely to play his best. “It’s obviously a good feeling when you hit a good shot and the crowd likes it,” said Kyrgios. “I always get a pretty warm welcome, so, yeah, I feel at home here.” The interview then moved on to Kyrgios’s colourful outbreak of swearing in the final game of the match. Asked about his F-word tirade, he replied “Do you swear? Yes or no.” And then, when a follow-up question arrived about the BBC’s on-air apology, he said “Fine. I don’t care.” Edmund battled to the best of his ability Credit: getty images So be it. It seems unfair to moan about the lack of personalities in modern sport and then chastise a genuine one-off like Kyrgios when he steps out of line. Underneath the brusque exterior, he has a decent heart, as he has shown by dedicating a slice of his tennis winnings to a support programme for disadvantaged children in Melbourne. When you see Kyrgios play tennis of such extraordinary class, you wonder why he only arrived at Queen’s as the world No 19. But then, since last autumn, he has played around half as many events as his peers, as a result of chronic niggles in his elbow and hip. That ranking bears little resemblance to his grass-court form over the past ten days – a period in which he also took Roger Federer to a deciding-set tie-break in Stuttgart. On Thursday’s form, he must stand among the five men most likely to challenge Federer’s hegemony at Wimbledon. Lleyton Hewitt exclusive interview And what about Edmund? He may have been outgunned on serve, managing “only” ten aces of his own, but he showed plenty of tenacity to save five of the six break points he faced, and used his piledriving forehand to fine effect. Asked if he saw Edmund as a contender for Wimbledon, Kyrgios replied: “He played really well today. I was really surprised. He handled the low balls well, volleyed well. Yeah, I would definitely put him in that category.” Meanwhile, Novak Djokovic produced a commanding 6-4, 6-1 win over second seed Grigor Dimitrov. Surprisingly, this was Djokovic’s first success against a top-five opponent since he beat Andy Murray in the first week of last year. And Murray himself is expected to make a decision on whether to play next week’s Nature Valley International in Eastbourne by 6pm on Friday.
FILE PHOTO - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski
ATP 250 - Stuttgart Open
FILE PHOTO - Tennis Club Weissenhof, Stuttgart, Germany - June 17, 2018 Switzerland's Roger Federer in action during the final against Canada's Milos Raonic REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski

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